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California State Library 




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the above number in the Register of Boolcs, 

which is a/ways open to inspection. 



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thereof, and by other State officers at any time 

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■sesrxiu 




An Illustrated Journal of Mining, Popular Science and Genera! News- 



BY DEWEY & CO.. 
Publishers. 

Beaeh Mining For Gold. 

In tlu- but Dmnbe] 

,i oj the beach mining for gold inAus- 
H ■ jive in this i i aving of 

chine there used. It is said to l» 
ful, and as we hai e many gold 
perhaps this machine m 
fully introduced here. Wai len Re veil, 
mt "I the locality where thic 
thus describes the nucMii 
The Ulustral b of ;i "beach-box, 11 

^ ,i fair represent i\ now in 

ia boil! entirely ol timber, 
mil from end to and measures fonrti 
The bin jh, and at the 

ad the Boor i 
ground. The fall i 

I by raising the 
legs or wheels, 06 may 
ry. The 
/», is t : 
inches in diamoteri 
made <>f stoat cam 
generally tai i d to pri 
it and render it 
ighl 

which the water is 
carried up 

, thence emptying into the "hop- 
per" d. The liottoin of the hopper is a sheet 
of perforated iron, two feet square the size of 
: - rforatione are one-fourth of 
,n inch in diameter, and generally about one 
nil is Bhovelled into the 
hopper, and the liner part of it is 
through the perforations by the 
and drops upon I he " lide 1 < | shown on 
the sketch bj dotted lines), within the box be- 
low the hopper. A copper plate is laid a 

ri in v. to which the gold 

itself. This slide is two feet wide and 
three feet long VI its lower end an opening is 
left two inches from the plate bi neath it, and 
from tlir i ii'l of the box, bo that 
the watei ' drop on the next plate, /, and 
from that over the plates y and n, which are 
also overlaid with mercury. At the bottom of 
plates J\ :/, ft, " riffles," l, /. I, are placed ; i and 
} are formed by leaving a space between the 
plates, so as to form a hollow into which the 
water must drop before reaching the next plate. 

\ i.i.> .■ these two riffles slides are placed to break 
ih. impetus of the water when it reaches them, 
ami force it more gently under them. The last 
riffle-box is of different construction horn those 
above! It is live inches in depth at the upper 
side, thirteen inches in the lower, and live inches 
wide. In the center a slide is placed, and 
pushed down to within two and a half or three 
■ i the bottom of the riffle-box. The sand 
and water drop into this box, and are forced 
..ni again at the lower -side of the "slides," 
thence running over the last table, or "tail- 

d m. The object of the two first riffles is to 

break the force of the water, and that of the 
riffle-box is to catch any loose mercury that 
may come off the plates above it, and which 
on account of its weight, cannot be forced out 
again by the water. On the "tail-board," 
instead of mercury, "baize" or blanket is 
placed to catch all "rusty'' gold that the mercui y 
will not take. On the lower side of each riffle 
a "flange" is nailed so as to overlap the plate 
below, and tints prevent the water passing 
beneath. The plates are secured to the 
frame by battens, and are nailed at top and 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1883. 



bottom. Koch plate usually weighs about 14 

When sufficiently rich, the plates arc taken 
from the frame and isl on end, so thai the loost 

! : 

with a chisel, both gold and amalgam being 
taken "it. 

After .ill the m< 

I from the amalgam, the latter is pe- 

i . i i | | ■ .. i . . r i . i I . 

■ dry entirely. Should auj ol I he cop- 
per have been Bcraped off with the mercury, it 
will remain with I he gold, which latter has then 
to undergo the process ol refining at the bank. 

The working results of these claims are 

various and almost impossible to estimate, the 

often unworkable for months, for 



Test Silver for Blowpipe Use. 

The ail 0] both qualitative and rpian- 

the blow pipe must be 

rhemiealh pure to enable ill- opi iii"' to make 

accurate and reliable 

Bilvor. For convenience, it is best bo have the 

silver in two forms, one in tin shape of an 

ingot, saj al I r, inches long and j inch 

square; the other should !»■ in thin foil, 
which latter maj be found a usi til in the 

-a\ . 

It chemically pine silver cannot be procured 
from a reliable source, such as a mini 
class laboratory or assay office, (ieorge Att- 
wood, in his •• Practical Blowpipe Assaying," 
gives directions for preparing it as follow a : 




APPARATUS USED FOR GOLD BEACH MINING IN AUSTRALIA. 



ii is only heavy seas and strong winds that 
bring payable gold upon them. Revell thinks, 
however, that the average wages throughout 
the year would not be less than 21. 10s, per 
week. 

New Shaping Machine. 

The machine hero shown is among the late 

machines produced at the works of the San 

o Tool ( lompany. It has a quick re- 



FIC.S 



Dissolve the purest silver that ran be obtained 
in weak nitric acid, dilute with water, allow - the 
solution to settle for several hours, after which 
decant carefully and reserve for use only the 
portions that are perfectly clear, to which add 
a solution of chloride of sodium (common salt) 
until the white tlocculent clouds of chloride of 
silver cease to appear. The precipitation is 
then complete. Filter and wash the precipitate 
repeatedly in warm distilled water; then dry 




SAN FRANCISCO TOOL COMPANY'S 

turn and a stroke of twelve inches. The table 
lowers to receive twenty four 




NEW SHAPING MACHINE. 



to receive twenty- four inches. The 
tables have horizontal and vertical faces, and 
arc provided with revolving vise boxes, or plain 
clamp vises, as shown above. They are strong, 
substantial tools, and in. every way suited Eor 
the rough use such machines usually have to en- 
dure. 

WORK is now being resumed c>n many of the 
base ore prospects along the range between 
Pioche and Bristol. The prevailing idea that 
the Day furnace will resume work at no distant 
day is the cause of it. 

Secretary Teller has recently decided 
that applicants for mineral patents may desig- 
nate the name of the paper in which they desire 
the advertisement of such application to be pub 
lished. 



and fuse (in a new and perfectly clean crucible) 
with its own weight of crystallized carbonate 
of soda and about one-eighth of its weight of 
pure nitre. The heat should be applied gently 
at first, and finally raised to the fusing point of 
silver; and when cold, the crucible should be 
broken, and the button of silver carefully 
washed. The silver must be again dissolved hi 
nitric acid, water added, the solution allowed 
to settle, and great care taken in decanting, as 
before. The silver is precipitated as before, 
and the precipitate repeatedly washed for 
twenty-four hours with warm distilled water. 
Dry, and again fuse with carbonate of soda. 
If this process is carefully carried out, the sil- 
ver obtained will be found to be chemically 
pure. 

Sir Michael Bass, of pale ale fame, has 
given 1' 173,000 for popular institutions. 



VOLUME XLVII 
Number 1. 

Advancement of Science. 

■ ■ . 

menl ol ta at Minneapolis, Minn., 

..n the 15th of August next, As considerable 
int. rest is manifested iu ociation 

we make some 
to the classes of members, patrons, etc.: Any 

pei ■■> beeo ■ : I th< 

tion upon recommendation in writing by two 
member* or fellows, n ■ i by the stand- 

ing committee, and election by a majority of 
the members and fellows present is 
sion. Fellows are nominated bj 
committee from auch of the membi i 

tee, or have by their 
labors aided in advancing science. The el 

Of follows [fi by ballot 

and a majority \ ote of 
the members and fel- 
lows present in general 
ion. Any person 
paying to the associs 
tion the sum of $1,000 

a patron, 
and entitled to all the 
— "~ "' privileges of a member 

and to all its publica- 
tions. The name of any 
member or fellow two years in a 
nual dues is erased from the list of tin I 
ciation, provided that two notices of indebted- 
ness, at an interval of at least three months, 
shall have been given; and no such person is 
restored until he has paid his arrearages or has 
been re-elected. 

The admission fee for members is five dollars 
in addition to the annual assessment. On the 
election of any member as a fello w an ad- 
ditional fee of two dollars is to be paid. 
The annual assessment for members and 
fellows is th ree dollars. Any meml >e c 
or fellow who pays the sum of fifty dollars to 
the association, at any one time, becomes a life 
member, and as such, is exempt from all further 
assessments, and entitled to the proceedings of 
the association. All money thus received is in- 
vested as a permanent fund, the income of 
which is used only to assist in original research, 
unless otherwise directed by unanimous vote of 
he Standing Committee. All members and Eel- 
lows must forward to the permanent secretary, as 
early as possible, and when practicable before the 
convening of the association, full titles of all the 
papei-B which they propose to present during 
the meeting, with a statement of the time that 
each will occupy in delivery, and also such ab- 
stracts of their contents as will give a general 
idea of their nature, and no title is referred by 
the Standing Committee to the Sectional Com- 
mittee until an abstract of the paper or the pa- 
per itself has been received. 



Table Mountain Nickel Mines.- ALovc- 

lock correspondent informs the Silver State 
that Bell, Curtis & Co., of San Francisco, have 
a number of men at work developing their 
nickel mines in Cottonwood canyon, Table 
mountain. They have several veins, from a 
foot in width upwards, that assay from twenty- 
five to forty-five per cent nickel, while the 
main lead is from twenty to 10') feet wide and 
carries from five to eight per cent of nickel. 
They arc running a tunnel to crosscut this 
ledge at the depth of 200 feet, and Mr. Bell, 
who is an experienced miner, is giving the mat- 
ter his personal attention, 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 7, 1883 



Correspondence 



Howells— A New Town. 

Walker District, Yavapai County, A. T. 

(From our Arizona Correspondent.] 
It was my privilege to-day to spend a few 
hours visiting the " Howell Smelting and 
Mining Co.'s " properties, situated at Lynx 
creek, twelve miles southeast of Prescott, thecap- 
ital of Arizona, and also the county seat of 
Yavapai county. 

This twelve miles has now an excellent hilly 
load, and the county has a large force of men 
working out a #15,000 appropriation for im- 
proving and extending this road through to the 
Black Canyon road to Plnenix, to shorten the 
mail route some fifteen miles between Prescott 
and Phoenix, and accommodate a rich and 
lapidly developing mining region with daily 
mail and freighting facilities. By this sensible 
move on the part of the Commissioners, they 
get a donation of the free use and ownership of 
fully $8,000 worth of graded roads, already 
made by John Howell, for the use of the 
Howell mines and smelting works. The ad- 
ditional labors of the county in extending the 
road will prove a great benefit and public con- 
venience: and a few r years 1 continuance of this 
good road policy, and the direct results and in- 
fluences will more than double the resources of 
the county. 

Last fall Mr. Howell was clambering about 
those pine-covered and rocky hills 

To Make a Plant 
I'm' smelting and reduction works for the ore 
from the Belle Mine, situated beyond Lynx 
creek two and one-hall miles, over high and 
rock)' hills. He decided to plant the works on 
Lyux creek, and grade a road to the mines. 
The inconvenience and cost of lumber showed 
the economy of first erecting a sawmill, and 
cutting the pines growing near by for his build- 
ing lumber. 

But I hasten simply to mention some results 
of a very few months of well planned labor 
programme. There stands a thirty ton water 
jacket (Rankin & Brayton, S. F.) smelter; one 
eighty ton Howell cylinder rotary oxidizing 
furnace, to prepare rebellious ores for the 
smelter; a Wheeler crusher, of largest capacity; 
a small mill for reducing ore for accurate sam- 
pling; a steam engine of ample capacity to fur- 
nish the power for double the present plant. It 
would require a lengthy article to particularize, 
OK even mention a small portion of the points of 
convenience secured by ingenious plannings, 
positions and mechanisms, and even the most 
unshapely roughness of the location is used just 
as if it was intended and fashioned for a most 
perfect and 

Labor Saving Reduction Site. 
The steam engine moves the automatic com- 
binations. The rock received from the teams 
on the upper terrace floor, falls into the croco- 
dile jaws of the crusher that rapidly reduces it 
to the proper fineness or size, and it is thence 
automatically and regularly transferred to the 
rotary cylinder furnace, which revolves slowly 
as the heat passes through it. The cylinder is 
placed at a slight inclination, and as it revolves 
the ore within it is dropping from top to bot- 
tom and slowly passing downward toward the 
lower and hotter end, and gradually loosing its 
sulphur, arsenic, antimony and various proper- 
ties that interfere with the most successful 
smelting. 

This Howell Rotary 
Was considered the greatest achievement of 
American success in the great problem of work- 
ing the rebellious ores of Nevada, where it was 
used with eminent success as a chloridizer of 
the precious metals, and at the same time oxi- 
dizer of the base metals and thus preventing 
their being amalgamated, they were carried off 
with the tailings, and the dechloridized silver 
in the ore would then amalgamate and give 
from a base, ore a result of fine bullion. 

This one mctallurgic achievement, in com- 
parison with all the other devices calculated to 
attain the same results, stands out chief and 
alone, if viewed in its economic, healthful and 
successful records. This is one of the many 
silver ore machines that we take a special pride 
in, its being of Pacific coast origin, and one that 
every progressive mining nation will sooner or 
later adopt. 

The smelter has been running now one month 
from 1st of May, has shipped crude bullion to 
amount of about $25,000 to Chicago by the A. 
I*. R. R., sixty miles freighting by teams to 
depot at Ash Pork. The freight of nearly 
ubiety tons of bullion out, and the coke 
brought in, amounted to 230 tuns for this first 
month. 

The Trinidad coke costs at furnace $36 per 
ton, but when the railroad now talked of, and 
surveyed, to Prescott, is completed (if ever), 
then the same coke would probably cost not 
over $)(i per ton, and other expenses be reduced 
m similar proportion. 

Improvements Making. 
There is a large force of men employed in 
shaping the foundations for future and im- 
mediate additions. Another and larger water- 
jacket smelter beside the present one, and a 
stamp mill with pans, and settlers with Prue 
onccntratbrs, ml! bu immediately erected to 



dispose of a elass»of free-millbig ores rich in gold 
and silver to better andvantage than by smelt- 
ing and selling with lead bars. The concentra- 
tors will save the principal portion of the sul- 
phurets, that are more or less seamed into the 
free-milling ores, and then these sulphurets will 
be passed through the smelter. 

Refining and Reduction Works 
Will also be put up, with cupel hearths to re- 
fine the base bullion, by converting the lead 
into litharge (oxyd of lead), and use that as 
flux for the furnaces, when needed, and bar the 
bullion, as tine silver and gold, instead of lead, 
as now shipped. 

The sawmill attachment has now been dis- 
posed of, and the space utilized for extensive 
charcoal depository. This article is abundant, 
furnished at 15 cents per bushel. 

The materials for these improvements are 
now mostly on the ground, and, when all is 
ready, will soon become a part of the plant. 
The great demand for supplies for the company 
and employes made it necessary early to lay in 
a large stock of such articles as are needed in 
such a camp. They order merchandise by full 
carloads, and thus get supplies at least possible 
cost, and from a bulletin board on the front 
of the store, I noticed some articles even 20 
per cent cheaper than they were selling in the 
stores in Phoenix. The stock seemed of choice 
goods, and no bar attachment. But in this re- 
spect, the new town of "Howells" is amply 
supplied. As a miner counted them upon his 
fingers, he said: "There are nine whisky shops 
now in this camp." I have no space to moral- 
alize. The wise ones (saloonists) predict, of 
course, a great future for this camp. That a 
large amount of bullion from this and the many 
other less developed properties that must soon 
attract capital will make this a center for busi- 
ness, and hence their haste to set their traps 
early. 

There are hundreds of smart business men 
who rely very much on the judgment of these 
salooti-men in making up an estimate of the 
future prospects of a locality. They certainly 
say by acts that this camp has backing. But I 
prefer to drop this and see where John Howell, 
our old Nevada youth of sober, steady habits 
and sound judgment, got his inspiration to 
make this wild plant far out among rocks and 
hills. So I will, or rather did, visit the mine 
that produces some of this hope I visited 

The Belle Mine 
Near Lynx creek, Walker district, Yavapa 
Co., expecting to find a hole in the ground 
several feet deep, etc My open note to the 
mine foreman brought me in friendly relations 
with a nobleman, though dressed for his oc- 
cupation of going anywhere in and about the 
mine, and entirely devoid of any official badge, 
except the square countenance of a thorough, 
reliable business miner. I am sorry I am pro- 
hibited by his request from mentioning his 
name. It would cheer many an old Comstocker 
and Eastern Nevada miner to know he is yet 
occupying a place of trust and responsibility, 
and enjoying the labors that make much for 
others' wealth. Having donned a miner's jacket 
and hat in the whim house, I took a lighted 
candle, and we proceeded to descend by a ladder 
in the shaft, all made firm and safe. All the 
way down as I faced the foot wall (but it was 
almost perpendicular), to my left was the ledge 
as it was broken off by the picks, gads and 
powder. It started at the surface small but 
gradually widened out to two feet or more, eye 
measurement, and this with slight wavings 
of the casings continued on down with 
us till we landed on the 105 level. 
We now pass through the tunnel, to the north, 
in the ledge, or the space which the ledge had 
occupied, and could inspect it every foot of the 
way overhead for ISO feet, to where we iind the 
men driving on the tunnel. Here my guide 
took the hammer and gave some signal blows 
on the end or face of the tunnel, and they were 
quickly answered by rappiugs from a similar 
spirit on beyond us, who had started where 
the ledge outcropped on the hillside, and were 
aiming to connect with this tunnel; will speak 
of that again. The ore in this tunnel just 
passed over, is of a beautiful clean character, 
free from cab or waste of any kind, and a va- 
ried galena, with some elegant copper stainings, 
with oxide and carbonate of lead; in some por- 
tions it carries considerable free-milling gold 
and silver ore. Then from shaft and ladder, 
south, all the way in the continuous ledge 240 
feet, brings us to the face of the tunnel and 
facing a beautiful full ledge. Some few stop- 
ings have been opened, which developed some 
very massive deposits of high grade smelting, 
and some free milling ores. Having thoroughly 
satisfied myself that every foot of drift here 
showed a very uniform and perfectly regular 
vein, we climbed slowly out, admiring what was 
glittering all the way up. Now, again on top, 
we go to the north and down the h II to thefirst 
tunnel going in on the end or edge ol the ledge, 
toward the south ninety-four feet, all in the 
ledge same as we found in the tunnel, where we 
heard the raps from this open tunnel (soon to 
open into the other tunnel). Coming out we 
go clown the hillside 100 feet more and enter 
the tunnel to connect with the '210 feet level 
as measured at the main shaft. This drift of 
4b'0 feet is all in ledge of same character, only 
gradually enlarging and improving, but of same 
character as above. This is the 210 feet level 
of the main shaft, which extends yet down to 
the 800 feet level, all the way in ledge and pay 
ore, regularly formed and gradually enlarging, 
as developed below. The entire work so far, 
is simply to show if it is a nunc and to get tun- 



nels with car tracks all ready for stoping out 
ore in a business way. As yet a simple whim 
with rope and bucket has sufficed to hoist for 
exploration developments. Now the machinery 
is on hand and the timbers hewn and sawed 
for a 

First-class Hoisting Works 
With wire cable and steam power — and the ore 
dump to be constructed with chutes for conven- 
ient loading of wagons. But while this work 
is being done ore' sufficient to run the present 
furnace can be run out to the two tunnel dumps 
each having well graded roads for teams. 

Mr. Howell has forgotten so far, all about ex- 
terior show. About the whole mine the only 
planed lumber is the ladder, and even his own 
family residence, in Howell, is free from all ex- 
pensive show, and if my recollection is correct, 
I think it like the others, is yet of pine color, 
or unpainted and veryplain. We had an excel- 
lent appetite for dinner, after finishing our ex- 
plorations out and in the mine, and about 1 :30 
enjoyed dinner at the mine boarding-house, 
which was a fuller supplied table than the aver- 
age of first- class hotels. 

After dinner, retired to the foreman's office, 
a comfortable log cabin, where he enumerated 
his employes in and about the mine: Two 
cooks and table waiter, three packers, etc. 
The miners and graders in all amounted to 
60 men. Wages for miners, $4 per day; others, 
S3. 50 and S3 ; each paying $9 per week for board, 
unless they board themselves. There is ouitean 

Extensive Pay-Roll 
Of workers at and about the smelter. This, 
with the many buildings being erected in the 
town, makes this one of the mining camps of 
old, especially when a dozen big freight and 
rock teams are encamped there for the night." 
All this stir conies from the faith of Boston 
capitalists in John Howell, and the faith that 
John Howell has in this Belle mine and other 
mines of Walker district. He was ready to 
back his faith by his own capital, and they 
acting largely on the faith in others 1 state- 
ments, invested, and now have the satisfaction 
of seeing a vast and successful wealth- creating 
enterprise progressing. 

In all my intercourse with the most practi- 
cal businessmen, and those of mining and mill- 
ing experience in this Territory and Nevada, 
I have never found one to speak disparagingly 
of Mr. HowelPs skill and abilities, or any 
word derogatory to his character as an upright 
and thorough business man. Whatever may be 
the share owned by any distant partners, they 
have entrusted it in able and reliable hands, 
and from present appearances, nothing but 
some calamity can prevent their venture from 
that success which alljin this vicinity prophesy 
and wish for it. 

The Belle mine, though perfect in its dip, and 
a north and south true fissure vein containing 
within itself the requisite fluxes, and various 
favorable features, is by no means the solitary 
ledge of this disti-ict. I am told by disinterested 
parties that there are richer ores, and some 
other fine properties near by that await the ar- 
rival of capital to place them in pay big 
position. 

Maj. ('. P. Dake, one mile above the Howell 
smelter, has a water- jacket smelter and reverber- 
atory furnaces, also a good sawmill and several 
mines of good repute, but a financial embarrass- 
ment holds it back from successful operation at 
present. 

Lynx creek has for years been mined in flood 
season for surface gold. Some good fortunes 
have been made here, and the wealth deposits 
are yet just being opened. B. W. Ckowell. 
Prescott, A. T., June 1, 1883. 



The Silver King Mine at Calico. 



Wood River Bullion. 

The Wood River Thin * of June 20th, says: 
The first freight destined for Omaha, via the 
Wood River Branch, the Oregon Short Line and 
Union Pacific railways, was received at Hailey 
on the 2f>th of May — about 15 days ago. Since 
that date the following shipments have been 
made : 

BASK BULLION. 

DATE. BARS. 1> \ I I-;. BARS, 

May 25 960 1 uiic 5 240 

" 26 720 ' * 6 240 

' * 29 ' 480 " 7 480 

" 30 2 40 " 8 240 

" 31 240 " 9 240 

June 1 960 11 480 

2 480 " 13 480 

" 3 720 

Total, 720,000 pounds of base bullion. 

The only company that has shipped ore to 
Omaha since the railway has been completed, is 
the Mayflower, which shipped as follows: 

ORE. 
PATH. I 1 ' lUNDS. DATE. 1*01 NDS, 

May 31 68,oco June 7 24,000 

June 2 48,000 . " 8 4.S,ooo 

3 24,000 " 9 24,000 

" 5 24,000 " 12 24,000 

Total, 284,000 pounds of ore. 

The bullion carries an average of 800 ounces 
silver and 70 per cent, lead, and the ore aver- 
ages 200 ounces silver and 70 per cent, lead per 
ton. The value of the shipments above given 
is therefore in the neighborhood of #177,000. If 
to this be added the value of the ore shipped by 
the Mayflower company since the first day of 
April of this year— about $90,000— it will be 
seen that the value of our ore and bullion ship- 
ments so far this year exceeds §1265,000. 

This, when the rate of freight on ore and bul- 
lion— S30 per ton- is taken into account, will 
l»c admitted to be a very good showing indeed. 



The following is from the Calico "Print, San 
Bernardino county: This mine is earning for 
itself a record that will eventually place it fore- 
most among the rauk of great mines on the 
Pacific coast. Up to the 1st of January last its 
progress was slow in its development, but since 
then it has made considerable advancement, and 
is now in excellent working order, and is turn- 
ing out a good supply of bullion every week. 
Under the able management of Mr. A. Barber, 
the superintendent, assisted by Mr. Al. Waits, 
the foreman, the mine is worked in a systematic 
and careful manner, and is producing results 
that are quite satisfactory to all interested par- 
ties. We are indebted to the superintendent 
for valuable information concerning the condi- 
tion of the mine, and to the foreman for his 
kindness in showing us through the various 
levels, and describing the characteristics of the 
ore deposits, and the veins that have been 
opened up, besides the different methods em- 
ployed in all its operations. We were informed 
that Nadeau's ore teams, that haul the ore forty 
miles to the company's mills at Oro Grande, arc 
supplied with twenty tons of free milling 
ore every day, and that the average 
milling returns per ton from the ore 
is $90. Up to date 8,200 feet of 
openings have been made in the mine since 
December, 1SS2. At present, forty persons 
are employed in and about the mine. In com 
pany with Mr. Waite, we ascended the steep 
hillside, while the thermometer was on tip-toe, 
and trying eagerly to reach 1 15° in the shade, 
but failing to force the quicksilver above 100". 
When we leached the highest level the view of 
the landscape below and beyond was grand ami 
interesting. 

We fiist entered the first level at the west 
end. This level extends through the bill in a 
westerly and easterly direction, is 400 feet in 
length and at a depth of sixty feet from the 
summit. It follows the ledgefrom the foot wall. 
Eighty feet from the entrance a winze lias been 
sunk to a depth of eighty-six feet, which con- 
tains ore from top to bottom. In this level 
there are fifty-four feet of crosscuts, and 250 
feet of stopes, besides an upraise of fifty-five feet. 
A car track is laid nearly the whole length of 
the level, the waste rock being run out in the 
ore car to the mouth of the tunnel and dumped 
lown the hill, while the ore is dumped down a 
chute to the second level, and from thence to 
the fouiLh level, where it is run out on the 
tramway to a large chute. In this level numer- 
ous rich pockets have been opened, some of the 
assays from which reached as hicjh as $1348. 

Along a considerable portion of the wall, 
which is on the north side of the level, 
no ore was uncovered; hut on the south side 
drifts have been run in following vein? 
that carry ore, assaying from a few dollars up 
to hundreds of dollars to the ton. We next. 
passed along the second level which is in two 
hundredfeet, which contains good milling ore 
its entire length at frequent intervals. Wo 
next examined the third level, which is in <i.".o 
feet, and has three upraises. Xo. 1 is thirty - 
five feet high; No. 2, 40 feet; Xo. 3, ninety 
tcet; cross cut forty feet. Large quantities of 
ore have been taken from this level. We next 
entered the fourth level where we found con- 
siderable work had been done. The length of 
this level is 540 feet, and it runs 
in a north-westerly direction. t It con 
tains a cross cut of seventy feet* and three 
upraises, the first sixty feet high, the second 
sixty feet, and the third twenty feet. Two 
winzes have been sunk; the first one to a depth 
of seventy-five feet, and the second sixty feet. 
In the fourth level, 200 feet from its mouth 
running in a northeasterly direction, is a cut 
off which extends upwards through all the levels, 
and which containsnoore asfar as it has been pros 
pected. Ore can be seen in this level along the 
ledge in many places, in pockets, which some- 
times yield rich ore and sometimes low grade, 
but which will average over S100 to the ton. 
All the ores from the levels above are lowei ed 
to this level by means of chutes, and tin n 
hauled out by cars to the smallest cf the large 
chutes. At the mouth of this level is 
the company's blacksmith shop, which 
is kept constantly 1 msy making and 
repairing implements used in the mine. The 
lowest level runs in a northerly direction, ami 
is 375 feet from the apex of the mine, and is 
550 feet long. At a distance of 400 feet from 
the mouth of the tunnel is an upraise of 170 
feet. In this level several veins of ore have 
been cut through. But it is the intention ..J 
the managers to cut through the ledge before 
any quantity of ore will be taken from this 
level. After awhile connection will be made 
from this level to those above, and all the ore 
that now passes out of the fourth level into the 
two large chutes will be discharged from tie 
fourth level into the new h'0-ton bin a short dis- 
tance above the superintendent's office. 

There are on the dump about 2,000 tons of 
third grade ore, which averages about $25 to 
the ton, which it will not pay at present to 
mill, but will probably be reduced when a 
quartz mill is put up near the mine, which 
will, no doubt, be done at some time, not far 
in the future. Cood roads have been graded 
to the mine, and every improvement is being 

made that will lessen the expense of open 

the same, and no doubt some day a tunnel Mill 
be run from Wall street canyon, under the town 
of Calico, into the mine, out of which the oie 
will be taken in ore cars. 



Jom 7, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



IQEeHy\Nicy\L Progress, 



Solid and Hollow Iron Columns. 

■ 

and hollow pillar! - it often 

i hollow 
pillar i "1 one, Now . this 

tinted out, not 
,il,si,iut-l\ (hi th true that, 

compai ngth of two pulai 

tame hight nud diameter, one solid and the 
other hollow, the latter has th. 

tnomically stronger. The fa» I 

solid '"11111111 ban the hollow of tin 

fcer; but the lesaer area u 

than the greater, becauae the 

lie solid pill i 

rul in reaiating the bending force than the 

metal in the circumference of the hollow pillar. 

he quantity of material in both theaotid 

and hollow pillar ol equal hight ia the t una, the 

holloa pillar is i.\ far the stronger. A simple 

ition will enable on 
understand the fact, by enabling 

thai of a 
solid one, bj ..ol- of the diameters being given. 
It i> mown, in fo» i, that hollow colu 
. ..■ 
■ > i . i • I t" any larger diameter, their stn i 
oreasin itely till a limit ia reached 

by the shell of the metal becoming too thin to 
. ,,.1111.1 casting. Taking an example 
I tow nine's work a hollow pillar nil 

ti r, having an internal diam- 
ond a thickness of metal "I 
one-half inch, ia five and one- 
than a solid pillar with the 
: tal. A thickness oi one- 
half inch may be regarded an a practical limit 
in manufacture, 



Tub band-aew mill, aajra the Wood '•' 
ia evidently the mill of toe future where valu- 
able hard-wood out, Even now the 
novelty of this style of mill baa almost worn off, 
ami th> , every |>art of 
the oonntry. That this mill ia looked on as the 
coming mill is the fact that there 
ore not teae than half a damn prominent am- 
ohinery builders who have recently brought them 
ire preparing to. 

band saw mill .sells for a 
better price than the product ol a circular saw; 
but it is nut every person who can run 
saw for catting logs. The man who 
fully engineers a band mill i-- always capable of 
doing tirst-class work, and with the advan* 
in. i. him ■ p i the oiroular 

luill for nice work, there is little wonder that 
hie prod more, There i- likely to 

be a load call for competent hand*saw mulere 
within the next tew years. 



VlSIBll I I 

the "visibility ol i aled Lin bo which 

made in these columns two or 

i eka since, a correspondent of the Seten- 

1 find that Lines p 

m glass are similar to graven linos; they 

dean cut, having a definite shape 

pth. Such linos are always visible in the 

mil central or oblique light will 

show the bottom of eachcutasa dark or col- 

ored line, plainly visible, and requiring no 

graphite or ocber foreign substance to indicate 

i ... microscope is the test tor a properly 

ruled line, The mechanical elements (press- 

nir, etc, I entering Into the process of ruling arc 

i hatlineshave been | 
ruled. The slightest accident to the point of 
.,■■-. oi 1 1,, surface of the glass not being 
perfectly clean, will spoil a line; that is, pro- 
sratvli which cannot be satisfactorily il- 
luminated in .miv light. \\ ell ruled bands of 
linos. 70,000 i" 80,000 to the inch, are \ iaible in 
;. with central light; and with a 
Smith vertical illuminator (giving central light), 
1 have seen 100,000 lines to the inch. As these 
individual linos have a width of about 1 -200,000 
■ I .1 inch only, it follows that the difficulty ia 
noi to see such a narrow line, but to eliminate 

!. tions which tend to blur the ii 
the microscope, and so prevent the resolution or 

fttlOn Ol tliu lines in a hand of them. 

Thk Tkkvtmknt of Cjement. — At an assem- 
bly of German manufacturers an interesting re- 
port was made by Von Froideville, in which he 
asserts that a really good cement, one that has 
been suitably mixed, not only does not crack, 
I ml even in a northern climate is aide to resist 
1 1,> wi ather. If, however, too much water has 
been used, so that a mossy crust forms on the 
surface, and the whole mass is not homogeneous, 
the cement checks or cracks, and as soon as 
hail' 'lacks appear moisture enters and the 
frost destroys it. Another fault referred to in 
this report is that of the cement striking out, 
which it ought not to do. Von Froideville also 
says that cement can be colored nicely and per- 
manently with suitable colors, but quite a good 
deal ol coloi is necessary if it is required to en- 
tirely hide the natural color of the cement and 
give it the exact color desired. It is to be 
borne in mind, however, that the addition of 
any coloring substance to cement tends to give 
it a softer and more friable character, so that 
there is required a comparatively larger quan- 
tity of cement than without color. 

THzOkiftiN or Waterspouts.- -What facts 
were noted of several waterspouts seen in the 
Pacific ocean have been examined by Mr. 
Keoigu Atwood, and he concludes as follows: 
i The waterspouts on the Pacific were caused by 
a cloud ^heavily charged with cool moisture 
drifting from the high mountains of Costa Rica 
coming into contact with air currents and 
clouds traveling in a different -direction and of 
a warmer temperature, by which contact the 
clouds surcharged with aqueous vapor ac- 
quired a rotary" motion, causing them to dis- 
charge a part of their moisture and make them 
assume a cylindrical form, which finally fell by 
its Own gravity into the ocean. 

THE production of rails of various descrip- 
tions in the Uuited States last year was as fol- 
lows: Bessemer steel, 1,438,155 tons; iron, 
■J27,K74 tons; open hearth steel, 22,765 tons; 
total, L;688,704 tons. The corresponding pro- 
duction in 1SS-2 was as follows: Bessemer 
steel, 1,330,302 tons; iron, 488,581 tons; open 
hearthsteel, 25 217 ton>; total, l,844,100i 



Stoppinc Knoises by Electricity.— The 
1 tundee I in deaci ibing this nev ap- 

. "The hugi ■ 
at Manhattan Works, working at from B00 to 

■ i, and driving a lly wheel of 

about 35 tons weight, formerly took two min- 
to i eat after the steam had 

been taken oil. This apparatus ha- been fitted 

.1 the ponderous engine is now brought 
up in 30 second*. To see this powerful, majea- 
of machinery, the developer of power 
for a long range of works, almost immediately 
brought to a standstill by the more touching oi 
a button at th- the building, is an mi 

illustration ><i tie easy control Oi enoi - 

m -i ■ ordered a rrangements. To 

mill-owners the utility of the apparatus will be 
evident." The device has been applied to the 

driving engines oi several of the largest mills in 

lhindee. 

Tmk Hi si M \ 1 1 kiai. POftJoiflXS, — Jt is claim- 
ed by many builders that wood joists, encased 
in plaster, an proof against any ordinary fire, 
and for many reasons are much preferred by 
them t" the ordinary regulation tire proof iron 
joists. Strips are attached to the joists, over 
these strips of iron are run, and on these the 
plaster is spread. The theory is that in any 
ordinary lire these joists thus treated will be 
fire proof, and only when the tire has reached 
nry that the building must go any way 
will they be affected. Here comes in one of the 
advantages claimed for them. When a building 
is being burned by a furious tire the iron joists 
expand and crush out the walls, and do other 
The wood joists would simply be 
burned up without injuring the walls at all. — 
!. a ml" i-iiimi. 

Aluminum Coated luo\. — Dr. Gehring, of 
Landshat, has invented a very simple process of 
coating iron with aluminum, by which it may 
be cheaply rendered highly ornamental. Me 
uses a rJunscu burner with a blast or a muffle, 
and is thus able to manufacture various objects 
of the durable metal for daily use, the coating 
of aluminum giving them a silver white luster. 
He also produces a gold luster or any other 
color, and even an enamel coating, all of which 
substances are said to adhere very firmly to 
aluminum. Aluminum, like tin, does not oxi- 
dize under normal conditions, and even stands 
the heat of an ordinary fire, while it is much 
more lustrous than tin. 



SeiEJ^TIFIG P^OGF^ESS. 



A NEW WOOD SCREW was recently described 
by Mr. Geo. Barnham, Jr., ata meeting of the 
Philadelphia Engineering Club, in which the 
thread, instead of being cut, is formed by pres- 
sure, the blank being passe I through a series of 
■oiling dies. The first set of dies forms a slight 
idge, the second deepens the depression, and 
so on until the screw is perfectly formed. The 
point of the screw is left conical, without any 
thread, thus differing from the ordinary wooden 
screw, so that, in soft woods, it may be driven 
part way home before using the screw-driver, 
as is now done with most iron screws. Screws 
of all the larger sizes and bolts are made in this 
way. The thread is said to be as perfect to the 
eye as a cut wood -screw, and much stronger. 

Wasting Oil.— One difficulty with tyros hi 
the use of machinery is the wasting of oil by 
its t' i profuse use. It often happens that a bearing 
will heat when supplied with too much oil that 
Will run cool when supplied with the proper quan- 
tity. The-reason is that when the lubricator 
is partly worn it becomes sticky : it resists [re- 
moval ; it remains tenaciously between the 
shaft and its bearings ; whereas too muph of it, 
usually thin and limpid, serves to "wash the 
bearing," and let the part into closer contact. 

Pulleys. — The Wood Worker says: Our 
cast iron pulleys are much lighter than form- 
erly, and latterly, wrought iron pulleys have 
been introduced, having in addition to the ad- 
vantages of being already balanced and being 
stronger than cast pulleys, that of being very 
much lighter. Wooden pulleys of very neat 
construction have been placed on the market, 
and paper has also been pressed into service a3 
pulleys. 

Marble Veneers. — Another substitute for 
wood finishing in the line of veneers has made 
its appearance. A patent marble veneer com- 
pany has been formed in New York City for 
themanufacture of pliable venoers,that perfectly 
imitate marble or any variety of wood, and can 
be applied to any surface, no matter hqpy ir- 
regular. The advantages are apparent. It is 
predicted that it has a profitable and possibly 
brilliant Euturei 



Progress of Electric Science. 

Speaking ol the work of the electricity dh is- 

ion, and the development of 

Mi. K. M. Rentley, one of 

the examiners of the electrical division of the 

Patent < ' ery suggeetu i 

that about two the plications 

ata in electricity were filed in 1882, of 
which about two thirds were granted i 
how the subject has grown in importance within 
B tew years, he said that in Is77 electricity was 
a Bub'CUflB Hi a division. Now it is th 

division b the Office, and regarded as the most 
important The astonishing growth is due 
chiefly to two causes: Pint, the invention of 
the telephone; and, Becond, tie development ol 
the magneto 'electrical machine. The telephoni 
bad opened, directly or indirectly, a wide field 
of inventions. The minds of many persons 
throughout this country were turned to thin 
class of invention, and not only wore improve- 
ments upon the telephone itself attempted, but 
attention was given to a great many incidental 
appliances useful in its successful application. 

The second great stimulus to invention was 
the development of the magneto-elecl rical ma- 
chine. For thirty years the world has been 
awaiting a cheap and convenient source of elec- 
tricity. Immediately following the discoveries 
of Faraday and others, from 1,830 to 1840, there 
v ' a wide spread effort to make practical use 

Of them, and special activity was manifested hi 
the lines of electric lighting. Tin- are light was 
put into practical form, and the foundations ol 
incandescent lighting were laid. But no - eo- 
nomic source of electricity was at hand; for the 

galvanic battery consumed too much zinc for 
profit. The principle of the magneto-electric 
machine had, indeed, been long known: but it 
wa.s left for the Italian, l'acinotti, in I860, bo 
perfect a machine wherein continuous ami con- 
stant currents were generated. The idea liter- 
ally lay on the shelf, however, until 1870, when 
Gramme re-invented practically the same ma- 
chine, and pushed it into notice. He was 
speedily followed by tin' Siemens brothers, of 
Berlm, and by Mr BrushanddtKersin the I'nited 
States. The magneto-electric machine, affording 
a cheap and abundant supply of electricity, im- 
mediately rendered practical all the half com- 
pleted inventions of thirty years, and opened 
the way to many new ones. Brush got bis pat- 
ent in 1877, Weston soon after, and the growth 
of the electricity division of the Patent Office 
has been steady and marvelous ever since. The 
invention had been, however, rather in the ap- 
plication of known principles than in the dis- 
covery of new ones; for during the fifty years 
that have elapsed since the investigations of 
Faraday, little new has been added to the 
science of electricity. The present activity 
springs from the application of well known ex- 
hibitions of the still unknown force; and more- 
over, only a few of these features of the science 
have been as yet made of practical value. One 
of the broadest and most successful patents ap- 
pears to be the telephone. 

Absorption of Oxygen by Iron Cement. 

In the construction of a railway bridge over 
the forth, a number of cylinders were sunk 
into the bed of the river. They were built of 
iron rings six feet in diameter and several feet 
high, and made a total hight of sixty feet. The 
space round the sections was filled up from the 
inside by a rusting composition of iron turnings 
mixed with sulphur and sal ammoniac. When 
wet, this mixture oxidizes and swells up, so as 
to fill the spaces into which it is thrust. It was 
applied to the joints by one man. One day last 
May, however, when there was a perfectly still, 
somewhat hazy atmosphere, and considerable 
heat without direct sunshine, this man was ob- 
served to become overpowered by some "mys- 
terious influence," and a companion descended 
by a windlass to bring him up to the top of the 
cylinder. He managed to get the man into the 
bucket of the windlass, and so to get him hauled 
up into purer air; but the deliverer himself suc- 
cumbed to the same influence, and falling into 
a pool of water at the bottom of the cylinder 
was unfortunately drowned. One of the con- 
tractors now descended, taking care, however, 
to fasten a rope to his body, and it was fortu- 
nate he did so, as he also succumbed and had 
to be pulled out by the rope. Dr. Wallace was 
called in to account for this fatal accident and 
traced it to the absorption of oxygen by* the 
rusting compound, thus depriving the air in the 
cylinder of its sustaining power. The oxygen 
combined with the iron and sulphur of the mix- 
ture, and the state of the atmosphere prevented 
free circulation of fresh air into the cylinder. 
The result was that the gas breathed by the 
man was nitrogen, or air robbed of its oxygen. 
The normal proportion of that gas in the air is 
20.9 or 21 per cent, and Dr. Angus Smith h<is 
shown that this proportion cannot be altered, 
even by one quarter per cent, without produc- 
ing appreciable effects, while a loss of one half 
per cent gives rise to serious inconvenience, and 
air containing only twenty per cent of oxygen 
may produce grave consequences if breathed for 
a considerable time. When the deficiency of 
oxygen exceeds this to a sensible extent, a can- 
dle refuses to burn. 



the famous chemist sec Ii d, the u -■- of an ab- 
solute unit of light co radiation 
emitted by a square centSmi inum in 
At the instance of M. Cochery, the 
Minister of posts and telegraphs, an in- 
m n begun by 
M. Violle, and his tir*t OX] 
him to some observations on the raidatiou of 

silver in \ bath of pure melted 

silvei was placed under a thenno-eletric nUe 

i with a mirror galvanometer. The 
radiation ln.m the bath CbO normally on Tin 

battery through an aperture in a donble-walli d 
1 by circulating water, \s thi 
ted the pile showed thai the radiation 
led until the instant jus' 
solidifying, when th 
precedin 



To I 'i Seating Pow Kit >•> 

Coal. -In determining the heating power ol 

coal and other l i 

employed, consisting oi a cylindrical w 

copper, punctured belov with numerous small 

holes, and to the top of 

hollow tube of the -ame matei id. closed with fl 

mall vessel a I h< ami form to 
contain the materials, and a basal piece hi whicli 
to tit it. In practice, a toughed portion "I" the 
finch powdered combustible, is intii 
mixed in tin* mortar with a certain quantity of 
nitrate and chlorate of potaasa, and thia mix- 
ture is next placed in the small coppei ej Linder 4 
and ignited with a fuse ol known dimensions. 
Before the combustion tal.es place, the outer 
cylinder is slid down over it. being held there 
by springs attached to the haaaj piece, the 

whole contrivance being then plunged into a 

pease] containing a quantity jrf water ol known 
tempi ra1 uri , The combustion soon sets in, 
continuing with vigor until the material has 
burned completely out. The instant the com- 
bustion has ceased, the stop cock in the lube is 
tinned, and the water allowed to enter the air 
chamber, to cool down the heated interior: the 
temperature of the water is now observed. 
From these data it is easj to calculate thi re- 
sults, making allowance for the sligb.1 Lose oc- 
casioned by the impossibility of bringing the 
apparatus back to its first temperatura — owing 
to the increased temperature of the water and 
the very small losses by radiation and conduc- 
tion. 



I'.\ 'ink following simple method, plates for 
telephonesand microphones may be made of any 
thickness: One or more plates of the desired 
shape and size arc cut out of a piece of ahei I 
iron. After dressing, rub them well on both 
sides with a dry cloth. This is essential to ob- 
tain an equal thickness, as otherwise the greasy 
spots left by handling would prevent a uniform 
action of the acid. It is better, also, to treat 
only one plate at a time. After wiping the 
plate well, it is plunged vertically, so as 
to be submerged in a hath of a /otic acid. 
Acid that has been used several times in 
a Bnnsen battery can be used, o, rise the 

azotic acid of commerce, with the addition 
of one fourth of water. The plate must be 
taken out frequently to ascertain tie thickness. 
When the proper thickness is obtained, thi 
plate is well washed in water, until the coating 
of blackish rust or oxide has completely disr 
appeared; it is then let dry ami one or more 
coatings of black Japanese varnish given on 
both sides to prevent oxidation. In thi 
plates may be obtained as thin as desired, and 
of all shapes and sizes. When membranes are 
used in microphones this IS no slight advantage. 

La yatnre. 

Singl'LAJB K\ru»sio\s. A singular accident 
and one of a somewhat alarming character «• 
eently occurred at one of the ironworks estab- 
lishments in Middlesboro, England. A large 
slag ball was taken from one of the furnaces 
and tipped over upon the slag heap when it in- 
stantly exploded. Three large pieces of the 
half molten slag were thrown high into the air, 
and, in falling, crushed through the roof of the 
railway station near by, falling in the imme- 
diate vicinity of several passengers waiting for 
the train. The query naturally arose- liov 
the explosion produced? Another equally sing- 
ular explosion is reported as having recently oc- 
curred at Lancaster, T:exas, Vhere a bin con- 
taining about 3,000 bushels of cotton seed re 
eently exploded, as supposed, from the genera- 
tion of gases. 

To Remove the Odor From I'ktkoi.ki m.— 
The disagreeable odor from petroleum or benzine 
may be removed, according to F. Grazer, by 
allowing it to percolate through animal or wood 
charcoal, or by treating it with sodium carbon- 
ate or lead carbonate. Another plan, which is 
recommended, is to employ a solution of bi- 
chromate of potassa, acidified with sulphuric 
acid, with which the benzine is agitated. A 
subsequent washing with water is necessary. 
A simpler plan than any of the above, that we 
recall having seen recommended, is to agitate 
the benzine with milk of lime, freshly prepared, 
which is reported to be very effectual. 



The Radiation of Silver in Solidifying. 
—At the International Congress of Electricians 
in l ssi , M. J, Violle proposed, and M< Dumas, 



Ouicin Ob' THE Unj\i:i;se. — The well known 
Parisian editor, M. Moigno, lias w ritten a pap r 
on the synthesis of the heavens and the earth 
In this lie makes the deduction that everything 
originated from ether, which first generated 
hytu/oiren. To an imputation ol ether ho at- 
tributes the existence througWt the uni 
e>{ the action of gravitationi 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 7, 1883 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 

COMl'lMSD EVERY TUOESDAY I IU-M ADVKR TISKMENTS IX MIXING AXD St'lKXTIFIC PRESS AND OTHER S. F. JOURNALS. 



ASSESSMENTS-STOCKS ON THE LI3TS OF THE BOARDS. 



UoMr \xv. 

Alta S M Co 

AudesS MCo.. 
Argenta M Oo. . . 
BeUe Isle 



Bento 



I M i 



lit'nrn 



i M < 



a M < 

fill! 



Gould & Curry M C 
Hale* Norcross M 
Independence M Co 

Martin White M C< 
Mt Auburn M To.. 
Nm-t.1i Belle file...'. 

Potosi 

Red Hill HM Co.. 

Tip Top M Oo 

Utah S M Co.. 



Location No. 

Nevada.. 26. 

Nevada.. 22. 

Nevada. .HI. 

..California.. 5. 
..10. 



Aji't. Levied 
25.. July 



Ne 



.('r 



. 8. 



.Nevada. 

.Nevada 



... 1. 
..19. 



,14. 



Nevada 

Nevada. 77. 

Nevada. .11. 

Nevada.. 15. 

; 11. 

...California., ti. 
Nevada.. 12. 

.. .California.. 8. 

Arizona.. 8. 

.Nevi " 



__..June27 

25.. June 21. ..July 24 

20.. May 16.. June 19. 

10. .May 26.. July 2 . 

20,. June 26.. Aug 4. 

50. .May 17. .June 21 . 

20.. June 15. .July 19, 
5.00. ..Time 5. .July 9. 

20. .June 14.. July 19. 
1.00.. May 21 June 21.. 

25.. June 25.. July 27. 

50..Juuel5..July 20. 

50. .June 7. .July 11. 

30.. May 25... lime 28.. 

25. .July 9. .July 11. 

20. .May 25. .June 27 

20. May 16. .June 2. 

25. .May 17..June20:. 

05.. May 24..Juue26. 

25. May 29. July 6 
1.00. .May 16. June 20 

25. .May 14. June 15., 



Delinq'nt. Sale. 

Aug 7 

Aug 



AK.Y. 



Place of Business., 

302 Montgomery st 

... 309 Moutgomery st 

327 Pine st 

310 Finest 

... .302 Montgomery st 
... 309 Montgomery st 

408 California st 

414 California st 

326 Montgomery st 

327 Finest 

309 Montgomery st 

327 Pinest 

309 Montgomery st 

... 309 Montgomery st 

310 Pinest 

309 Montgomery st 

43S California st 

310 Pinest 

309 Montgomery st 

....328 Montgomery st 

309 Montgomery st 

G ( ! Pratt 309 Montgomery st 

J H Applegate 320 Sansome st 



BEOKE 

Aug 27.. Win. H. Watson, 

..Aug 22.. B Burns 

..Aug 17. -F. M Hall 

..July 10..J WPew 

. . July 19. . W H Watsou 

..Sept 3..C P Gordon 

...July 11.. F B Latham 

. .Aug 9. .Fv Wegener 

..July 26.. W. Cunningham.. 

..Aug 9..C E Elliott 

..July 16.. P Jacobus 

..Aug 20..EMHall 

.Aug 13. .A K Durbrow.... 

..Aug 2..SF Ligbtner 

..July 23. .J WPew 

. . Aug 8. .J J Scoville 

..July 16.. J H Wilkins 

...Julv 12.. J WPew 

..July ll.WEDean 

..July 23 E Hestres 

Aug G..HDeas 

July 9 
..July 16 



Wales ConG & 8 M Co Nevad: 

OTHER COMPANIE3-NOT ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS 



Alexander M Co 

Alaska M Co 

Bald Mountain M Co, .. 
Continental C & I Co... 

Champion M Co 

Eintracnt G M Co 

i lenesee M Co 

Goodsbaw M Co... 

Gorilla M Co 

Hamburg M Co 

Homeward-bound M ('< 

Lima Con M Co 

Morgan M Co 

I'aeitiie M & Reducing C 

Roma Union M Co 

San Miguel Con M Co. . 
Vaqni M Co 



Name of Com^anv. 

Belmont M Co 

Beat and Belcher 

NewCoso MCo 

Savage MCo 

Utab S M Co , 

I'ninn Con S M Co 



Name of Company, 

Bulwer Con M Co 

t lonteution Con M Co.. 
Kentuck M Oo 

Navajn M Co 

Northern Belle M X M 



..California 
California 
.California 
.California 
.California 
.California 
..California 
....Nevada. 
.California 



.June 20. 
.June 7. 



Aug 



1.00 

4.00. .June 7. .July 9 
3. .June 26. .July 27 
05. .May 26. .July 5 
10.. June 4. .July 7 
Q5.. June 12,. July 7 



...Aug 27.. J K Warren.. 
..'.July 2S..A Judson.... 
...Aug 30. .L Shaunanan 
,. July 24. .W E Greene. 

...July 28.. P Wetzel 

.Aug. 3..H Kuujs 209 Sansome st 

. ^ nn t ni . .ii.r..i.i liai'.i il,.ri.n d 



....307 Montgomery s* 

320 Sansome s c 

125 First st 

. . ..309 Montgomery st 
, 522 Montgomery st 



4O.'.Juue20.'."july 30. ...Aug 22..J Stedtfeld. 
10.. June 6.. July 14.... Aug 4..CC Harvey 



..June 1. .July 
25. .May 24. .July 2 
05 .May 29. .July H) 
05. .June 11. .July 13. 
50. .May 23. .June 29 
35.. June 20.. July 25. 
02. .June 18. .Aug 6. 
, 1.00. .Apr 28. .June 4. 
30.. May 24.. June 28. 



_ Aug 1..A A Euquist.. 
...July 24. .1) A Jennings. 

...July 28. .A Bowie 

..Aug 6..R D Hopkins.. 
. July 20.. C LTildeu.... 
..Aug 15..J W Beviliug.. 



,...419 California 

. . .309 Montgomery st 

. . . 436 Moutgomery st 

401 California st 

...314 Moutgomery st 
...436 Montgomery st 

806 Market st 

413 California st 



Aug 27.. F. X. Simon 518 Sansome st 

Julv 22. .C G Brooks 210 Front st 

July 18.. TT Atkiusou 337 Pine st 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Silv. 



; M l !( 



Standard Con M Co 



Location". Secretary. 

Nevada. .J W Taw 

Nevada.. W Willis 

... California .. R N Shainwald. 

Nevada. . E B Holmes 

Nevada . . G C Pratt 

.Nevada. .J M Bu 



Location. Secretary. 

. . . California . . W Willis 

Arizona.. D C Bates 

Nevada. .J W Pew 

Nevada.. J WPew 

Nevada. .Win Willis... 

Arizona.. J Nash 

...California, .Wm Willis. . . 



Meeting 



, . .Annual. . 
. Annual.. , 
, . Annual . . , 

. .. Annual.. 

. , Annual . . . 
Vntuial. . 



Date. 
...July 13 
...July 9 
...July 10 

Tidy 9 

...July 10 
...July 16 



Office is S, F. 

.. 310 Pine St.. 

..309 Montgomery st.. 

320 Sansome st.. . 

, .309 Montgomery st. . 
. . 209 Montgomery st . . 
. . 309 Montgomery st. . 
LATEST DIVIDENDS-WITHIN THRER MONTHS. 

office in S. F. Amount. 

. .309 Montgomery st 05. . . 

. . 309 Moutgi unery st 25,. 

310 Pine st 10 

310 Pine st 25 May 14 

. .309 Moutgomery st 50 Apr 16 

... 315 California st 25 June 15 

. .309 Moutgomery st 25 June 12 



Payable. 
. ...Apr 12 
Apr2S 

Ju " 



Table of Highest and Lowest Sales in 
S. F. Stock Exchange. 



Name or 


Week 


Week 


Wl. 


EK Wl 


UK 




Ending 


Ending 


>;ni 


[NG EN) 


IN.: 


Company. 


June 13. 


June 20. 


June 27. July 5. 

1 


Alplui 


3 5(1 


3 25 


2 00 


2.751.75 


2.00.... 


1 80 


Alta 


.75 


Kb 


60 


.701 .4b 


.60 .40 


4b 




.'ft 


.85 


.60 


.75 .55 


.60; .45 


.50 




Sn 


55 




.35 .35 


........ 


45 


Argenta 


.20 


.45 


.20 


.30 .15 


.20 .10 


.15 


Atlas 
















Belchor 


1 bb 


2.2n 


i.35 


1.75 


1.10 


1.20 ... 


1.15 


Gelding 








. 


.... 


. ...1. . .. 




BestS Belcher 


n.lKI 


6.004.30 
1.501.05 


5 25 


4,0b 


4.50 4.0b 


4 III! 




1.10 


1 25 


.90 


.95 


.75 




















.20' .40 

1 101.00 


.50 
1 05 


.45 
.90 


.60 .... 

1.05 .80 






1.00 


90 






.15 .5 


.10 


.05 


,15 .... 










t laledonia 


.20 


.25.... 


10 


111 


...... 






.31) 


.45. .25 


41! 


III 


.25.... 






.46 
3.40 
3.10 


.55 .40 
3.S03.20 
3.552,50 


.50 


.40 


........ 






2.90 3.00 
2.40 2.10 






3.20 2.00 


■> ?b 


<.'ou. Imperial 




.10.... 


111 


,0b 


.10.... 


III 


( 'on. Virginia 


.VII 


.801 .55 


711 


.4a 


.55 


4n 




1.60 


2.3b 1 40 


1 65 


1.25 


1.451.25 


1 30 


Day 

Elk'o Con 




.40 .55 


1 (HI 


611 


.851 .50 


ob 


lb 


.20 .15 


811 


211 


...... 


25 




3.00 


3.303.10 


3 2b 


5,00 


8 00 4.10 


5 IK) 




.VII 


.8b 1 .... 


75 


Hi 


.70 .... 


60 




.4b 
.15 


.651 .30 
,45i .20 


.75 
.30 


.20 
05 


.30 ... 
.25| .05 




(Jraud Prize 


10 


Gould & Curry 


2. all 


3.95 2. V0 


3.402.50 


2. SO 2 25 


» 45 


Halo .^ Norcrosa. .. 


, .Vn 


88| 6j 


78 


5,25 


7.006.00 


7 (III 


Holmes 




.50.... 










Independence 




.35 .30 


35 


3b 


1.05,.... 






.25 


.15! .10 
.30.... 


.15 
.30 


.00 
.15 


.15 

.20 














Kentuck 




2.7b .... 




•/, m 








Martin White 


.:> 


.201.... 




m 












5.00.3.10 


4 15 


?. 80 








Mexican 


4.30 


3.6b 2.90 


3 00 


Mt. Diahlo 




3.00 


3.25 


3.00 


3.2bj.... 




Noonday 

Northern Belle 


6.25 


7.006-50 


6}" 


6 50 


6l" "68 


675 


North Noonday 














.Navajo 


all 


1.65 1.S5 


« 35 


a '(b 


4.20 2.90 


3 20 


North Belle Isle... 




.20|.... 




3b 


.50] ... . 




Occidental 




2 00 ... . 


•> 111 


1 lib 


1.90.... 


1 25 


< Iphir 


3.30 


3.95 2 70 


3 41 


V "5 


2.902.25 


■>. 55 


Overman 

on 

Potosi 


.50 


.65, .40 


.61 


.35 


.40 .... 


.30 


1.40 


1.601.30 


1 60 


I'W 


1.40:1.25 


1,40 


Pinal < on . 


.mi 


1.00 1 .... 


91 




.80.... 




Savage 


2.011 


2. SO 2.40 


« 71 


1 90 


2. 30 1.9b 


'.< Ill 


Sep. Belcher 




3 00 ... . 










Siemi Nevada 


i .no 


8.254.45 


6J 


;■; mi 


4.503.55 


» 80 


Sitvoi Kill 




.10.... 


.11 










Silver Kiug 


101 


105 i.... 


101 10 


lOfl 




10 


s.i.ri.ioTi 


S5 


1 00 .70 


.85, .60 


7f 






1 usoarora 
















SI 


9| 4 80 


7S 14.35 


58 |4.40 


4 80 




3.752.70 


3.752.80 


4.00 2.75 


2.80 


Ward 




vValu 






.30.... 






Vclloy, Jacket 


5.00 


5! 4.25 


4.75 3.60 


4.153.65 


3190 





Bullion Shipments. 

Hanauer, ]une25th, $3,500; Ontario. 25th, $1,526; 
II, ,in Silver, 25th, $9,000; Hanauer, 28th, $3,850; 
1 lorn Silver. 27th, $[8,000; Ontario. 28th. $4,427; 
Horn Silver, 28th, $9,000 ; Hanauer. 30th, $2,020; 
Crescent, 30th, $3,775; Ontario. 30th, $8,233; Horn 
Silver, 30U1, $9,500. 



A Lively Camp. -The Leadville mines em- 
ploy 3,250 men, and the pay rolls aggregate 
5280,000 per month. Leailville has produced 
(57,557,000 in gold, and S70,000,000 in gold, sil- 
ver and lead up to the present time, while the 
incorporated mining companies of that city have 
paid stockholders in dividends within the past 
four years nearly S'20,000,000. 

Negotiations between France and China 
have been difficult and unfavorable but have 
not been broken off. 



Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange 



. 51., July 5 

.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.50c 

10c 

45c 

6t)c(«l 

,.4.55(j4.6Q 
S5c 



THVKRDA 

200 Andes 

450 Alta 

200 Aryenta 

800 BeSelsle 

27u Bullion 

320 B. & Belcher. 

100 BodieCon... 

680 (Jon. Virginia 
1230 Chollar 4@4 % 

200 Grown Point 1.40 

425 California 10t«15c 

70 Confidence 2.40 

550 Day 50@55o 

50 Eureka Con 5{ 

300 Eureka Tunnel 05c 

100 Exchequer 

120 Gould & Curry 2.55 

Kill Grand Prize ,05c 

1010 Hale& Nor 6j@63 

1070 Mexican 3.30@3.40 

150 Navajo 2. B0 

40 Northern Belle. 

410 Ophir 2.70@2.75 

475 Overman 40c 

825 Potosi 1.45@U 

160 Savage. 2.05 

inn Pinal Con 70c 

1495 Sierra Nevada 4f»4 95 

200 Scopiou 60c 

900 Savage 2@2.15 

90 Silver King 10 

500 Senator 10c 

100 Tipton 45c 



150 Utah 2.80 

2440 Union 5J@5j 

80 Yellow Jacket 3 90 

VVTJBKKOON session, 

500 Alta 40@45c 

120 Andes 40t"45o 

+0 H. & Belcher 4.35 

100 Bullion 1.10 

10() Benton 15c 

14S5 Chollar 3.40@3-\ 

200 California.. lOCrtiac 

25n I'nu. Virginia — -irvride 

■411 Confidence 2.40 

75 Crown Point 1.40 

1500 Con. [mperial 1.05 

50 Day 

150 Eureka Con 5J 

100 Exchequer 20c 

500 El Dorado " 

10 Goulds Ciu-rj' 

.080 Hale& Nor .6}r«6g 

560 Mexican 3.05("3.10 

815 Navajo 2J@2 60 

40 Northern Belle 

500 N. Belle Is 20c 

100 Overman 35c 

420 Potosi 1 . 40c 1 

125 Silver Kiug ...10c 

280 Savage 2@2.05 

1065 Sierra Nevada. . "3@3ii 

100 Scorpion 4.. 80(^4. 90 

2140 Union Con 4.35(54A 

50 Yellow Jacket 3.90 



Mining Share Market. 

Mining stocks have been dull. The abandon- 
ment of business at the Board, for the few holidays, 
has of course had the usual effect. The Enterprise 
says thai prices have generally gone down by slow 
stages, as the faith of holders and north-end stocks 
has oozed out during the progress of the west cross- 
cut on the 3000 level toward the point where it was 
expected would be cut the ore vein found on the 
2900 level. Many have arrived at the conclusion 
that the streaks of quartz already cut where the con- 
tinuation of the vein found above, or that said vein 
does not come down to the 3000 level. Others, how- 
ever, in view of the fact that no clay Avail has yet been 
cut or water tapped, have faith that the vein looked for 
is still ahead. The foundation for this faith is the fact 
that the west wall of the ore vein when last seen on 
the 2900 level was slightly inclined lo the west. Sup- 
posing, however, that its general course should be 
vertical, there is still room for a considerable body of 
ore against it. The east wall must have changed its 
dip, and assumed a more vertical position than it had 
above in the Union gound, or something would have 
been seen of it. We know that the dip of said wall 
was much steeper in the Sierra Nevada than in the 
Union ground, and as the whole chimney or deposit 
was making toward the south this dip would be likely 
to be carried to about where the crosscut is being run 
on the 3000 level. Broken in two by the occurrence 
of our national holiday, neither fraction of "the cur- 
rent week, showed much vivacity in mining shares. 
On the opening of the Board, Thursday morning af- 
ter a recess of four days, the report that the Union 
Con. crosscut had developed some good ore obtain- 
ing, that stock was advanced $100 per share over 
Saturday's prices; whereby, the bulls were a good 
deal elated. That such a trifling advance should 
have created such a stir shows the low estate to which 
this business has fallen; nor would there be much to 
regret did this incident presage its early extinction. 
With this shrinkage of business the attendance at 
the Board has been light. The din and clamor of 
the olden time has nearly subsided, while thearmy of 
stock dabblers that once swarmed about the Ex- 
changes, or loitered in Pauper alley, has dwindled to 
a mere Corporal's guard. The manipulator of deals 
will be obliged to open up somewhere, another bo- 
nanza, or lie will in a short time find his occupation 
clean gone. Mere prospects and favorable reports 
will foil to keep life in the market much longer. ' 



HQWG &u^y\F(Y, 



The following is mostly condensed from journals pub- 
lished in the interior, in proximity to the mines mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Amador. 
Jackson. — Ledger, June 30; — The prospects of 

this property developing into a profitable mine have 
materially improved of late. In upraising a body of 
ore from three to five feet in width has been encoun- 
tered, which prospects big, much of the' rock show- 
ing free gold. From 40 to 50 tons of milling ore lies 
on the dump. Two gentlemen from San Francisco 
prominently identified with the enterprise came up 
Wednesday night on business. 

PACIFIC. — In reply to an inquiry by the editor of 
the New York Mining Record, we will say that the 
Pacific Company has absorbed the Empire, accord- 
ing to good authority, in this way : In a suit for 
damages brought by the Pacific against the Empire 
some three years ago, the plaintiff recovered judgment 
for $75,000. The general opinion is that in satisfac- 
tion of this judgment the managers of the Empire 
have voluntarily surrendered the property to the 
Pacific, although we are not aware that any formal 
transfer has been made. 

MAMMOTH.— The air-compressor for the tunnel- 
ing operations on this claim arrived in Jackson 
Thursday evening, and proceeded to the mine early 
this (Friday) morning. It is from the Marysville 
foundry, and made to operate two drills. The drills 
have not arrived. It will take two or three weeks to 
get all the machinery in position ready for actual 
tunneling. 

Important Consolidation. — A document em- 
bracing some 40 pages of printed matter has been 
filed with the County Clerk for recording. It con- 
sists of articles of agreement and consolidation of 
the Pacific, Empire and Plymouth mines, of Plymouth, 
under the name of the Plymouth Consolidated Gold 
Mining Company. The capital stock is $5,000,000. 
divided into 100,000 shares of $50 each. The Ply- 
mouth mine, adjoins the Pacific on the east. This 
consolidation is probably the final outcome of the 
long standing litigation between the Empire and 
Pacific mines. 

Miscellaneous, -The Seaton Company arc vig- 
orously prospecting the Maryland claim, adjoining 
the Seaton, and which was recently purchased by the 
Seaton Company. 

Butte. 

Gold Dust. — Record, June 30: To-day a Butte 
creek miner came to town, and deposited something 
over two thousand dollars' worth of gold dust in the 
bank of Butte county. This deposit was the result 
of a month's clean-up. The miner reported every- 
thing quiet along the creek, only a few of the claims 
being worked. "The miner"' wisely objects to hav- 
ing his name mentioned in this paper, fearing that 
foot-pads may lay for him sometime. 
El Dorado. 

The Melton Mine. — Mountain Democrat, June 
30: H. II. McClelland, Superintendent of the Mel- 
ton mine, Grizzly Flat District, was in town Tuesday 
and Wednesday. The improvements in his mill 
have been completed, and he started up his fifteen 
stamps last Monday. He is working four levels, 
each, except the lower one of course, 100 feet above 
another; putting through the mill all that comes 
and realizing a satisfactory and very respectable 
average. 

Greenwood. —Georgetown Gazette, June 30 
Mr. A. J. Morrell, President of the Morfell Con. 
Gold M. Co., has been in Greenwood during the 
past week busily engaged in arranging details for ex- 
ploring the Co.'s mines on the Cedarbergbelt. The 
6-stamp mill, which is a circular battery for prospect- 
ing purposes, weighing all 30 ewt., is now on the 
ground and will shortly be put in place, and will then 
be used for reducing the vein matter extracted, many 
portions of which show free gold. Mr. Morrell pro- 
poses to apply a small donkey engine for running the 
mill. Mr. Easton the superintendent arrived with 
Mr. Morrell, and with Mrs. Easton and their little 
daughter are a very agreeable addition to our popu- 
lation, and will we hope makealong and prosperous 
stay in Greenwood. Judge Swift was also of the party, 
a gentleman whose legal experience and acumen is 
only equaled by his practical knowledge of mines and 
mining. Commencing with California in '49 the 
Judge has since then owned, worked and experted 
mines in Australia, Colorado, Arizona, Mexico, South 
America and other places that he has visited, n<>t sim- 
ply as a tourist, but as a practical miner, reducing 
theory to practice. We hope to see Judge Swift 
again in this section, and that he will then be able to 
more thoroughly examine our mining opportunities. 
The new Eureka ledge continues to improvein devel- 
opment Mr, Cheek has uncovered the ledge about 
100 ft south of the first prospect shaft and finds the 
lode in no way inferior, it being more than 10 ft in 
width and pr specting from wall to wall in a good 
showing of free gold. Mr. Cheek is now sinking for 
this lode some 200 ft to the north, and by another 
week we hope to report the discovery of the lode at 
this point. The carpenters are pushing ahead vigor- 
ously on the new mill building, The mill and ma- 
chinery are now at Auburn station, and will be here 
in a few days. 

Mariposa. 

A Good Mine. — Herald, June 2$ \ We are glad 
to know that the mine owned by Louis Repetto and 
Alex. Bogliolo, on a branch of Maxwell's creek about 
five miles from Cbulterville, furnishes promising 
prospects. The lode is about three or four feet in 
width, and produces some fine gold-bearing quartz. 
A section of four or five inches on the vein is very 
rich in free gold. Some specimens we have seen 
were simply superb. The quartz is very brittle and 
therefore of easy milling grade. 
Mono. 

Standard Con. — Bodie Free Press June 28: 
There were extracted and shipped to the mills during 
the past week 1475 tons of ore. The bullion ship- 
ment was valued at $32,334.47. The west crosscut 
1200 level, has been advanced during the week 19 ft; 
total length, 320 ft. South drift No. 2 has been ad- 
vanced 19 ft; and it is now 13 ft. The vein at this 
point is about 5 ft wide. 

BoDlE Con. — During the past week there were 
131. 8S5 tons of ore hauled to the mill, and 174.240 
were crushed. The average value of the pulp was 



$28.92 per ton; that of the tailings $6.02. There 
were 218 ear-loads of ore hoisted from the mine. At 
the 1000 level the west crosscut was driven n ft; total 
length 275 ft. 

Bulwer Con. — The west crosscut from the north 
drift 700 level, has been advanced during the w eek 1 5 
ft; total length, 304 ft. The ground continues hard. 
Plumas. 

Crescent Mine. — Greenville Bulletin, June 27: 
At the Crescent mine all work, other than pumping, 
is for the present suspended. Mr, Chapman, one of 
the owners, spent some days at the mine last week. 
He publicly expressed himself highly satisfied with 
all that Mr. Davis has done. He has since returned 
to San Francisco, and will make such report to his 
partners as will govern their future actions. 

Green Mountain. — No new developments yet to 
report in the big tunnel, the drift goes ahead rapidly 
and steadily, the ledge does not yet prospect enough 
to warrant milling any of the ore, tut is of such char- 
acter as to justify belief that pay will soon be reached. 
In the meantime ore enough is taken from the up- 
per tunnels to keep both mills fully supplied. 

Plumas Con.— Nothing at all is being done at 
the Plumas Con. A contract was let same months 
ago for an extension of the main tunnel; this con- 
tract was finished some time ago, leaving the fa< e in 
solid granite, where it still rests, and is likely to. 

Gold Stripe.— On last Wednesday the mill was 

started up, but will be kept running "day shift on ly 

for some time. Some prospecting is kept up, and 

upon the result of this, future operations will depend, 

Shasta. 

South Fork. — Cor. Shasta Courier, June 30: Rob- 
inson & Co.'s arastra is running as usual. The mine 
looks well and is yielding some fine silver ore in 
addition to the decomposed gold bearing ore. 

J. B. Strong is mining and having a run of ore pill 
through E. L. Ballou's arastra. 

Wright & Ormsby are getting good ore and cxpfe 1 
to make a good run. 

Crum's arastra is idle iTow but will start as soon as 
they can get some ore down from the mine. 

The Manzanita is yielding as well as ever. 

Smith & Cooper's arastra is running and their 
mine yielding as usual. 

Water is abundant at present, but gradually failing. 
Trinity. 

A Regular Bonanza.— Trinity Jurual, June 30: 
While at Bolt's Hill on Sunday last we had 'the pleas- 
ure of meeting Mr. T.J. Blakemore, and from him 
learned that the recent quartz discovery made by 
"Uncle Jim" Blacknaore near : Eastman Gulch, was 
turning out much better than had at first been an- 
ticipated. Sixteen and one-half tons of the rock 
ground in the arastra produced $2,500, or at the rate 
of $150 in the ton, and the rock which they are now 
running is variously estimated at from $200 to $400 
■to the ton. The lode has well defined walls, and 
widens and improves as they go down on it. Under 
these conditions, it is not surprising that the Blake- 
mores last week refused $50,000 for their mine, the 
offer being made by a justly celebrated quartz mining 
expert from San Francisco. The Hickey mine, in 
the same district, continues to pay largely, and with 
every indication of permanence. Much prospecting 
is now being done in that vicinity, and in several 
instances splendid prospects have been found. 

BULLYCHOOP. — The development tunnel on the 
south end of the Mammoth is being pushed vigor- 
ously, working three shifts night and day. Length 
of tunnel at date is 165 feet. According lo esti- 
mates, 20 feet further will strike the ledge, showing 
the vein at the depth or 185 feet. If the showing 
proves as good as the surface prospects, our camp is 
made. The Bullychoop Co. are cleaning out the old 
shaft on the ridge. This shaft yielded upwards-')" 
$6,000, but on account of bad management was 
allowed to cave, and the work oji the tunnel was 
prosecuted in view of tapping the chute from below. 
The Davis Bros, are fitting up their mill, and expect 
to take out rock from the old workings as sqpn as 
the water lowers. Thomson has opened a new drift 
south in his upper shaft, showing some very fine rock 
and widening fast in the face. The Cumberland ( o. 
are getting encouraging prospects, The ledge is the 
first north extension of the Mammoth, and bids Tan 
to rival it in size and richness. The property is in 
the hands or a company of Red Bluff men, who 
intend to test its merits for themselves. 

NEVADA. 

Washoe District. 

Hale and Norcross. — Enterprise, ]iine^o : The 
winze on the 2600 level is down little over 40 feet.. 
Streaks of ore that assays well are still being found 
at the bottom of the winze. These are supposed to 
be feeders of a large ore deposit lying further to the 
west. The water winze on the 2400 level down to 
the top of the 2500 station. They now have between 
700 and 800 feet of drifts to drain. 

UNION Cox. — The south lateral drift on the 2700 
level is being overhauled and retimbered. The joint 
Sierra Nevada cross-cut on the 3,000 level is out 75 ft 
from the winze. The face was vesterday in hard, 
green porphyry. There is no water coming in. The 
rock does not break well in blasting, and rapid pro- 
gress cannot be made. The ore vein cut on the 2900 
level is supposed to be farther ahead. 

Ophir.— Very good progress is being made in 
cleaning out and repairing the old Central tunnel, 
but in some places it is found to be badly caved. 
Are also repairing the ladders and truck in the main 
incline. Ore is still being regularh extracted from 
the eroppings. The yield of ore from the old upper 
works will be greatly increased upon the compteiidn 
of the repairs to the old Central tunnel. 

Sierra Nevada. — Thus far no sign has been 
seen of the ore vein found on the 2900 level. 

Savage. — No work is being done in the mine at 
present, nor can any explorations lie economically 
made until the Hale & Norcross winze connects the 
2400 and 2600 levels, and gives a free natural circu- 
lation of air upon which lo draw. 

CALIFORNIA.— The C. and C. winze is being sunk 
at the rate of about 10 feet per week. The south 
drift on the 2500 level is making the usual progress. 

BEST and BELCHER. -The northeast drift on the 
2500 level is being advanced at the rate of about 2^ 
feet per week. It is still in vein porphyrv, and is out 
over 425 feet. 

Mexican.— On the 2700 level are cleaning out 
the drain in the west cross-cut. The main north 



Jolt 7, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



lateral drift on t) is bring driven ahead 

as rapiillj 

North Gould and Ci ruy.— The boitom of the 
shaft is still in rock I of quarts 

ms of clay. The predominating rock is vein 
porphyry, 

s» orpion. I he usual pi ng in the 

west drift on the 500 level [nereis no water, and 
1 Dged. 

being made in l 
drill to conned with tin- Sutro tunnel. Work is being 
pushed at both ends d the drift. 
Andes, The prospecting 

ping ore K 
still being extra 

and * 1 krv, ' in thea , ■■• ■ 
cut No. a Is ra ■ in vein material 

ol .1 favi.ir.ihir appe.ir.tncc. 

VeLi -a Tai iking out aboul 1 

of ore pei Winters shaft Are still re- 

opening old drift and slopi 

Aurura District 
Fine Paospbi i '■■'. |une 30: 

|udge Stearns, who has returned from Aurum, in- 
forms us that th ghl) elated 

prospects in the 1 
nattering development. n ide in the 

nunc. The Judge saw - ■ ol the ore, 

; they say they 

n ite this encour- 

ng our neighbors. I >r. 

■ ml Mr. Mike! deserve sue 1 1 
worked hard to ha result. M.i . theii 

Columbus District. 
Northern Belle. - True Fissure, June 30: 
1 ttle change in the a] , 

week. Alargcamountofpros- 

|>ccting is being done in all directions, the same bc- 

as possible. The south- 

i haft level has been extended 

is 133 ft The ground in the 

bci imi mm h softer w ithin the 

■ 1 ITie crosscut to the south has been 
!m n in thesame formation as last reported. 

1 nee run to date is 117 ft. Owing to 

■ it in the face of the main drift on the 

■ it level, eight shifts of men are now doing 

the work. The slopes on this level are producing 

lal quantity of ore. Both mills arc running 

■ 1 work. The crushing for 

■ 1 ■ 1 ■ . been o impleted, and 

mill No. -■ is now engaged entirely upon the corn- 
re. The bullion shipments amounted to 
(14,161.35 for the week ending fune 28th, and ag- 
11.778.69 on June account to the same date, 
Mi'i m Diablo. — The stope near winze No. 1 is 

turning out a Utile $50 ore. The slope east of lower 
winze No. 2, she ft of $70 ore, while the 

intermediate drift, between the second and third 
levels, nearl) above winze N'o.*i, is yielding >omi 
$iso ore, from an 18-inch streak that carries some 
1 i he stope above the west drift from the Cal- 

lisoil winze is looking well and turning out more ore 
1I1. in .1 week ago. The ledge will average fully 3 ft in 
width for a length of loo ft, the grade of the "ore be- 
1 rthing over $100 per ton. A shipment of 
bullion valued at $3,959.72 was made June 21st, and 
one of $9,286. IO [line 25th, 

Mount Cory District. 
M11.1 and Mine. — Esmeralda Herald, June 30: 
1 he nev mill for the Mt. ( tor) nunc will be built af- 
ter the pattern of the Geddes and Bertrand mill, 
• lose to Eureka. It will consist of a revolving 
crusher and a Brockner furnace, and will have a ca- 
pacity of 80 tons every 24 hours. It is to be com- 
pleted by the first of September, and will cost $150,- 
000. The Mi. Cory mine isjointly owned by J. C. 
L*'lood, ). I- Flood, George R. Wells and Alexander 
1 1. MeKen/ie. The company is a strong one, and 
will undoubtedly. roon bring their properh — which 
promises well — to the front as one of the leading 
bullion producers of the country . 

Northumberland District. 
I -ui.KiNO WELL. — Belmont Courier, June 28: 
Mr, George, of Northumberland, was in Belmont on 
Monday. He reports that the mines in that district 
are looking tiptop. There is considerable ore on the 
dumps, and good bodies of it in sight in the mines. 
The mill will start up about the isl of next month, 
when bullion shipments will be in order. 

Yielding. — Belmont Courier, ]une3o: It is ex- 
pected that the Northumberland mill will start up on 
ores from that district some day next week. The 
mines are yielding the usual quantity of good ore. 
Pioche District. 
MEADOW VALLEY. — Pioche Record, June 26; 
On Wednesday we were up at the Meadow Valley 
mine taking a look at what is called the "new strike," 
and in company with Supt. Duff we entered the mine. 
The strike was made in the old Fitzhugh tunnel, and 
is in a distance of 600 ft from the entrance of the tun- 
nel on Meadow Valley street. The ledge has been 
sunk on about six ft from the bottom ot the tunnel, 
and is nearly four ft in width from wall to wall at the 
place where work was then being done. Some five 
tons of this ore was sent to Dry Valley mill, and the 
pulp assay went $44 in silver and $6 in gold, the total 
pulp assay being $50. This discovery is nothing 
new. The workings of the mine shows this. The 
ore above this point was all extracted years ago. The 
ore had all been extracted down to the tunnel level 
in early days, then it becoming of low grade, it was 
abandoned, very probably because in those days $50 
ore would not pay. It is simply the continuation of 
the ledge, where work had been left oft". In the tun- 
nel level, on the ledge, several winzes have been sunk 
by chloriders, who finally abandoned them, In solme 
of the winzes the ore is said to go from $50 to $8o, at 
the bottom. At the present lime $50 ore will pay a 
.company a handsome profit. 

Reveille District. 
GOOD OKE. — Belmont Courier, June 30: Work 
progresses satisfactory in the mines at Reveille. 
Good ore is encountered daily. The weather is said 
.to be very warm in that district. 

Safford District. 
ANOTHER Strike, — Virginia Enterprise, June 28: 
II is now reported that a good strike was made last 
Saturday in the Good Luck mine, Safford district. 
A streak of ore has been found that is four ft thick, 
■which assays several hundred dollars per ton. Sam- 
ples of the' ore which were brought from the mine 



look as if they had been burned black, but 1 

■ n all through them. rhe 
not quartz, but black spar, which 1 

are. 

Scbroeder District. 

rill \i.u Dl&TRII - 
mining district latch di< 

■ 
north 01 theC, P. Railroads, and known ai 

have been 

in silver. The ores resembl 

■ . ■ ■■ ■ . ■ 
principal 1 

idy Jim, which are I 

■ ■ 

Silver Point District. 

work of dcvclopmi 

t|is beinj 
hauled to the Jefferson mill fi 

Tuscarora District. 

1 1 wi 1 1 ■ 

for running an additional 50 11 in rh< 1 

:. the face 
of the tunnel is tin lergoii 

■ ' ■ 
moi iture, all of wl favorable indi- 

cations. Another contract is to be lei oon. 
Tybo District. 
Mn, 1. Si vim. Belmont Courier, June 30: The 

1 ;. 1 till will soon start up on company's ore. and 

.1 [1 hi j pn ifitable run is confident]) expected, 
Ward District 
I in. Martin White.— Ward Reflex, fune26: 
Some wonderfull) rich ore was struck in the Martin 
White mine north of the old whim shaft Wednesday 
last. Some piece-, are nearl) all horn silver, and as 
malleable as lead. One chunk of this character was 
taken out that weighs 35 pounds. Two wagon- 
loads of ore, in sacks, supposed to be worth several 
thousands dollars to the ton, have been taken to the 

company's office, it being considered too rich to leave 
at the mill at present. Uon'lall get excited at once. 
It is not all of the above character b) an) mi ns. 
Where the work is going on, under the old crop- 
pings, noi to exceed [5 ft from the surface, there is 
considerable ore in the face, but little is known 
abont its extent. The ledge matter here is fully 25 
ft wide-. It was in this portion of the mine that the 
large and rich body of ore was struck that first at- 
tracted attention to Ward, and that has not been 
touched worth speaking of for a number of years. 

A Nku Discovery.— Safford Express, June 30: 
On Saturday last an important strike was made in 
the Good Luck shaft at Saflord ai a depth of about 
25 ft from the surface. There was encountered a 
streak of ore fully four ft wide, assaying several hun- 
dred dollars per ton. Samples of the ore look as 
though they had been burned black, and is similar in 
a great many respects to the Onondaga ore. Flakes 
of horn silver are visible throughout the rock, which, 
being black spar, gives the ore a burned appearance. 
The ledge has widened considerable during the week 
and now appears to be a permanent thing. The 
owners are highly elated over the find, and propose 
continuing the work in order to assertain if "she goes 
down" a fact which will be welcomed by our com- 
munity. 

Washington District. 

BlRDlE.— Gran tsville Bonanza, June 30: We are 
informed that a rich strike has been made in the Bir- 
die mine, which is located in San Juan canyon, 
Washington district, Nye county. This property is 
owned by Matsy Merton and R. W. Scott. There 
are several valuable mines in this district but very 
little work is being done on any of them at present. 

ARIZONA. 

JOTTINGS, — Prescott Courier, June 28: A. A. 
Alexander, superintendent of the Black Warrior mill 
and mine, arrived in Prescott Sunday night last, with 
two 1 m 1 one-half bars of fine silver bullion. The How- 
ell Co. are making a great deal of bullion. The mill site 
will soon be graded. Copper mountain smelter no: 
running. Threeshifts are taking ore from the mine. 
Saturday last, the shaft in the Gavin mine was down 
20 ft; vein strong and rich, Rumor hath it that Mr. 
McDonald recently found a rich deposit near that of 
Gavin & Go's. News from Trainor's camp, Turkey 
creek district, is encouraging. I.odes yielding well; 
smelter aboul ready for operations. Mr. Merrington 
has received a concentrator, for service at his Groom 



COLORADO. 

NOTES. — Georgetown Courier, June 30: The 
Wallace is producing two tons of 300-ounce ore dai- 
ly. The Eclipse is shipping about 15 tons of ore 
per month which mills nearly 300 ounces per ton. 
An air compressor is to be put in the Lebanon 
Tunnel. It will be operated by water power, and 
used in place of steam in mining operations. An air 
compressor has been put in place to run the drills on 
the Mcndota tunnel in place of steam. The tunnel 
headiffgjs now in over 125 ft. A chunk of ore about 
20 inches thick, four ft wide and five ft long, was 
shot down last week in the HennesyA Shay lease on 
the Mendota. A three inch vein of 300 ounce ore 
has been encountered in the Saxon Extension. The 
property is being worked under lease In Mr. R. 
Root. A vein of wire gold one-fourth of an inch 
thick, was struck at a depth of 34 ft in the Tariff lode, 
Ule creek, last week. The vein also shows 14 inches 
of quartz impregnated with free gold. The lucky 
owner is S. j. Kennedy, brum anew discovery of 
Comstock iV Lawrence, on Ute creek, specimens of 
free gold v\ ere taken at a depth of seven ft, valued at 
$150. The vein has also shown from grass roots a 
three-inch streak of ore assaying t3o ounces silver 
and one-half ounce gold per ton, and also another 
streak composed of galena, gray copper and zinc 
blende. The surprise that an assay gives one some- 
times from barren looking lode mailer, was illus- 
trated a few days since, by the assay of quartz show- 
ing no mineral, from the High Line lode, on I rriffith 
mountain, which gave a result of four ounces gold 
per ton. Mr. Colburn has been extracting some 
very fine ore from this lode recently, which mills 192 
ounces silver per ton. Last week we mentioned the 
finding of good ore at the surface of the Sonora, on 
Griffith mountain. During the past week, work has 
developed nearl) nine inches of solid ore thai will 
probably mill in the neighborhood of 800 ounces pe r 



ton. Mi 1 uella, Uic ow ■ 

■ 






IDAHO. 



Mil I . W . imes, |unc 20; 

The mill .. u , < \> 

, on cu i- 

■ ■ : 

the Pilgrim, Colt 

Kdwell m till men intend I 

itction, ai larani eldol 

. 
■ 

group ..1 mines on U 

AN iHPOK 1 IN 1 Si RIKI . . ng news 

inportant sink.- in the Ri 
outhfork of D 
owned by \. L. Mason and the Porter broil 
Bullion. While stripping the ledge on the 

.. they cut through a .. ■,.„[,. s j|. 

I 11 R e 1 
■ ■ 

Boy mini ,, ,,, .,, 

1 ■ igo, owned by [ami ■ M ah ana 
1 
•>hait. which is sunk on the fool-wall in quartzite. 
■ ''■ the hanging wall, which is n lime for- 

mation, and the com e ol the vein is north and south. 

It is, therefore, a contact formation. 

Chinese Miners.— Idaho World, fune26: rhe 

1 h ■ ' o. that have been working Plowman's 

drifting ground the south side ol 1 ast hill 

shares, cleaned up last Saturday. The 1 leanup was 

$6,000. They have been a! work since last fall. 
Plow man furnishes water and tools. 'I he < 'hinese get 
70% of what coios oul The cleanup was larger 
than was expected. 'I hej have commenced work 
again in the drift. 

The BigC uuas. Matthew Williams, with several 
miners, is now at work on the Big Camas mine. The 

l amas mine was started 10 years ago, when In, li, in- 
roamed this section, has been run into the hill 450 
feet, but as no vein was cut at that distance in. and 

as the owners wish to realize some return- from the 
property, work was resumed yesterdaj on the surface, 
The outcrop for a distance of 800' feet along Hie 
course of the vein is 50 feet wide, and thousand ol 
tons can be broken down and actual!) quarried out 
from the surface, as in most places the eroppings 
stand several feet above the ground. The company 
expect to build a double-bed arastra mill, to be run 
hy horses, and will locale it in the gulch below the 
mine, where they have some 30 miners' inches of 
water. The eroppings run an average qf $15 to the 
ton, and the formation is soft rendering the extraction 
of the ore inexpensive. 

On the Fast Fork.- M. J. Prockwav came in 
Saturday from the East Fork of Wood RiVer, where 
he has been examining the mines during 30 davs past, 
as well as on the Middle Fork of Little Wood River. 
On the latter he has discovered an immense iron 
mine which, he states, is 22 ft wide of solid ore and 
of a finer quality than yet found in thecountrv. He 
located this iron mine May 10, and has since that 
time had it examined by a number of experts. The 
ore contains but little silica, and can be quarried out 
so easily that all the smelters can be supplied with 
iron for fluxing. The Faro King and Wasatch are 
also promising locations near by. 

Till'; Idahoan Mink.— Willian H. Nye will visit 
I lailey after July 4, to see the Idahoan mine. Judge 
Turner is shipping ten tons of ore a day from the 
mine now, and expects to have the machinery, con- 
centrating works, etc., very soon. T.J. Fdington, 
another of the owners, is now in I >enver and may go 
to Chicago to secure the machinery , which will con- 
sist of a rock crusher, Cornish rollers, pigs and con- 
centrates. The water ditch has been completed and 
is now ready for the machinery. Judge Turner savs 
they will secure the best machinery made for the pur- 
pose and as soon as it is set all the second and third 
grade ore which has been left standing in the mine 
will be extracted and concentrated 

Summary of News.— Wood River A///w, June 

30: from parties Justin from bevond the .Sawtooth 
range, it is learned that ]. D. Murphy is opening up 
the Atlanta mine, at Sawtooth and having considera- 
ble high grade shipping ore extracted. The Colum- 
bia and Beaver Co. are getting ready to start their 
mill and are prepared to buy ores from the mines 
and from prospectors in any amount, paying cash 
down. The mill management charge $25 per ton for 
milling, and return 85 per cent of the assay value or 
buy the ore on that basis. The prospects' for flush 
limes and lively camps at Vienna and Sawtooth are 
200 per cent brighter than lasl year at this lime. The 
Nellie group in Smiley gulch, has been started up 
again, and five miners are now developing the pro- 
perty, and more are to be added as soon as there is 
room to work them. The Rosebud, on the South 
Boise river slope, is a new location owned by fulian 
Riley, and assays gives an average of the ore at 400 
ounces of silver to the ton. The roads will be open 
soon around Vienna, or in about ten days, and then 
the mines well ship ore to the mill, which is about 
completed and will be ready to run by the time the 
ore is at hand. There has been deep snow on the 
grade between the mill and the mine, and the haul- 
ing of ore has been delayed on thai account. The 
lower tunnel on the Mountain King mine has cut a 
body of ore stronger and of higher grade than at any 
point in the upper workings. The Vienna mine is 
showing up finely, and producing ore rapidly from 
the stopes and the management will ship to John- 
son's mill assoon as it starts up, The 20 stamps can 
be kept running constantly the entire season on ore 
now extracted and insight. 

MONTANA. 

GREGORY. — Inter-Mountain, June 29; On the 

600 ft west drift the character of the product shows a 
great improvement over that extracted from the levels 
above, for the ore at that depth appears as a solid 
body of galena varying in width from 20 inches to 4 
ft and sampling 80 ounces in silver, 60/ lead, and 
$^0 in gold. This remarkably rich streak is found 
on the hanging wall for a continuous length of 175 ft 
from the 600 ft station. The foot wall side of the 
ledge has not yet been explored, nor has its distance 
from the hanging wall been ascertained. The daily 
output is about 35 tons which will be very largdi in- 
creased on the completion of a projected concentra- 
tor which will have n daily capacity of too tons, A 



nk t.ooo fi h; 
■ 1 ■ 

irth of July w 
■ 
■ ■ 

1 000,000 
! illion froi 

cumulated prndu< isful run. 

NEW MEXICO. 

Notes, — .1 une 28: Wj man 

'■ 1 

;:i Bro 
drifting ■■ 

l bos. i tall ■■ 
■ 
d, $6,000. Abi ■ 
are now 1 - nn] h ted ai 1 leming, am i 1 1 ij]i . 
going for'. 

1 hi Rub) M. Co., is 

fon e ol 1 il '■ 

1 ■ 1, mi iei 1 'i ii mines, Thecompai 
000 ft of lui ■ ■ ■ mill site, and ii 
mill will be up and the machinery . 
w tnier. Jack Frost is w 01 

rickct, i one Mountain district. Hi i< now down 
l he Horn 

It is 
,,1,,- .,\ the i" si mines in thi district and 

have run up to BOO ounces. O 

Rii hards are working on the ' 'hampion mini 

three-quarters of a mile northeast "I I 

They are m granite and are flown - I a clear!) 

defined [edge some l8 inches wide. I : 

from 400 to 600 ounces to the ton, T. M. Hall is 
working, oi as he tei ms it, prospei ting, th< Uii ■ 
and i 'arrie mines on the west slope of Pino 

ini.iiM. On tin down 50 ft, sinking 

along a porphyry wall. The work is most!) i 
carbonates running from 20 to 30 ounces in silvei 
The Carrie is the adjoining and parallel claim, and 

shows heavy iron cropping. A shaft has beei n 

menced at this lead and is now down about 20 ft. A 
splendid bod; "I ore has cecentlj been exposed 011 
Houston .v L'hoinas' Alpha and Omega mine neai 
Pinos Altos, A cut 150 ft in length and averaging 

six ft in depth has been run along the v*ei 'deposit 

of ore, and then the entire surface tripped a distance 
of 65 ft back from this cut and for fully 100 ft of its 

length. The enormous body of ore thus exposed is 

of precise!) the same character as that shipped som 
tune since, and which by actual mill tests runs— firsi 
lot $23.40, and second lot $29.80 to the ton, Worked 
on the ground in a Mexican furn ice, it Melded 27 
ounces to the ton. F. C. Taylor having failed 10 
meet the third payment of $20,000, on the Old Man 
mine .it I amp I l< ming, due on the 15th, his work- 
ing bond was forfeited, and the property reverted to 
]. \V. Fleming and his associates, the original lo 
cators. The owners are still pushing work on the 
mine, having let a contract last Wednesday for a 
shaft to be sunk 50 ft deep on the contract, June, 
one of the owner* is no^ in Albuquerque, sampling 

ore shipped under the Taylor bond, for which no re- 
turns had been made at the expiration of contract, 
and which of course became the property of the orig- 
inal owners. Mr. Taylor gave an ordei for the 
same promptly upon the forfeiture of his bond. 
Upon June's return a full force will be put to work 
upon the mine. 

Telegraph Disi Rid .- l lor. Southwest Sentinel, 
June 30; The main incline on Mother lode has 
reached a depth of r.65 ft. I >re body is six ft thick, 
of good milling ore. This ore body is still compact 
and shows no indications of weakening in quantity or 
quality. T he ore samples aboul 35 ounces per ton. The 
drift at the 100 level running south is in 36 ft show- 
ing a thickness of six ft of 50 ounces free milling ore. 
The north drift on same level is in 3T ft showing six 
feel blanket ore, richer than that of the south drift. 
The main shafl on the Good Hope is now 41 fi deep 
and is being pushed as fast as possible. Ii is ex- 
pected that this shafl will reach the ore contact at 11 
depth of 75 or 80 ft. The shaft at south end of claim 
shows three ft of chloride ore, that will mill 18 ounces. 
A phenomenal strike of rich ore was made on the 
Tecumseh this week, in the discovery of the continu- 
ation of the Mother lode. The deposit has been 
stripped a distance of 120 It. Average thickness 
from $% to 6 ft. This ore is very high grade, and 
will equal if not surpass any yet discovered on the 
Hill. The stripping is being pushed rapidly, and b) 
another week an ore body will probably be exposed 
that for strength and richness has never before been 
found in the Territory. 

Avery*.— At the 41 level the drift is in n ft, show- 
ing 4 ft vein of sulphuret ore that is probably the 
richest average ore in the camp. Carefully sampled 
from wall to wall it assayed 175 ounces. This is a 
fissure vein in granite, and the improvement in the 
results of the last week's work is something extraor- 
dinary. Mr. John T. Mitchell, under whose super- 
Vision this work is being carried forward, is confident 
that the ore bodies so far exposed give evidence of a 
strength and richness thai will place this.camp among 
the leading bullion producers of the Territory, whet. 
the reduction works soon to be creeled are ill opera- 
tion. All the ore so far discovered in the principal 
mines is an absolutely Ux-n mill ore, and with the fa- 
cilities that the camp affords for cheap reduction, 
can be milled as low as 8 ounces with a fair profit. 

UTAH. 

Park City Mining Notes. Salt Lake Tribune, 
July 3: At die Disappointment mine the forceol nun 
has been increased and the first carload of ore will 
be shipped to-day. The Silver Ke\ may now be 

considered a regular producer. This week three 
carloads of ore were shipped from this property. 
More will follow right along in regular order. Mr. 
Pearson is now engaged in making preparations lo 
commence work on the Pioneer. He is fixing up his 
cabin and getting things in shape to put on a force 
or men and push the work of development ahead. 
White Pine canyon will be a lively place this summer 
and we hope rich lodes of ore will lie uncovered there 
before snow Hies next fall. There is some valuable 
lime rock in this region. A couple of prospectors, in 
working on a ledge this spring, uncovered a quality 
of rock which suited the fancy of a citizen of Salt 
Lake, and he unhesitatingly offered them $400 for the 
claim. The boys have the matter under advisement, 
but they are inclined to believe that farther on there 
i> something more valuable than lime rock in their 
ledge. 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 7, 1883 



High Prices for Prospects. 

The following suggestive article is from the 
Butte, M. T., Inter-Mountain : Mr. F. Melvin 
Chadbourn, connected with the Mining Bureau 
of the London Mercantile Association, has been 
in Butte for the past month. I hiring his visit 
here he has occupied himself in examining the 
silver and copper mines of Butte, and speaks in 
very favorable terms of their extent, richness 
and productiveness. It is understood that Mr. 
Chadbourn 's object in coming here was to bond 
some good properties and place them in the 
London market. But the gentleman intends to 
leave on Thursday morning on his return to 
England, and learning that he had made no ar- 
rangements to handle any of the Butte proper- 
ties a reporter this morning stopped the gentle- 
man on the street and inquired why he did not 
succeed in his mission, and why he proposed to 
go away so soon? 

"Well," was the reply. "I had heard before 
coming here that there were many fine mining 
properties here possessing every favorable indi- 
cation as to size and permanence, but still idle 
for lack of capital. They were many of them 
owned, I -was informed, by poor men, who, 
fully aware of their own inability to work 
them, would give a liberal, or at least a reason- 
able 'layout' to anyone to agree to develop 
them under lease and bond, and that the bond, 
would not be placed at any exorbitant figure." 
"What did you find on your arrival?" 
" I found a part of the report to be strictly 
true. I found more promising prospects than I 
ever saw in any other ten mining camps I ever 
visited. I found forty, fifty and sixty foot 
shafts sunk on ledges of great promise — ledges 
with smooth, well- 
defined walls, reg- 
ular dip, uniform 
width and fine 
veins of ore. Many 
of them are idle 
because the owners 
have no money to 
buy pumps and 
hoists or money to 
put up mills and 
smelters, or to 
take out ore and 
have it worked at 
the present custom 
rates. These pro- 
perties, you should 
remember, are not 
mines but pros- 
pects, and in most 
of them not a 
pound of ore is in 
sight below water 
level except what 
the main shaft ex- 
poses. They may 
all be capable of 
very profitable de- 
velopment, and 
such is a reason- 
able presumption 
judging from the 
experience with 
other properties 
which have been 
opened. But Eng- 
ish capital is no 
longer invested on 
merely presump- 
t i v e evidence. 
That kind of busi- 
ness is played out 
long ago, as did 
many of the mines 
which were bought 

on a surface showing. The policy of min*- 
ing investors has changed, and while they 
are still willing to pay a good price for a 
good property, one of ascertained value, they 
will pay nothing for properties which have not 
been opened and proved. We realize how 
difficult it is sometimes to purchase a developed 
mine and we are therefore willing to develop 
them provided that if they suit rrs we can 
have the option of purchasing them. But here 
an insuperable difficulty intervenes. 

The prospector either demands a tremend- 
ously high cash price, or an enormous bond and 
a gigantic forfeit. We protest, and they say to 
us: ' your policy doesn't give us a square deal. 
You open our properties and take them if you 
are suited; if not, you throw up your bond, and 
we have on hand a worthless property, or else 
one with a very black eye. We take the 
chances and you get the money, if the mine 
proves a bonanza. ' Tins kind of talk is what a 
man always gets when he wants to bond a mine, 
and unless he is willing to bond at five times 
the cash price, and pay a forfeit besides, if he 
does not take the property he is called a 
shark and looked upon as a speculating adven- 
turer. This is an extreme injustice to the 
agents of capital, and unreasonable too. For 
iustance, what honest man would sell a prop- 
erty at a high figure, which a little development 
would prove to he worthless; and, per contra, 
if a prospect owner has confidence in the extent 
and value of his mine, why should he refuse to 
bond it and have it developed '( If it opens 
well, he gets what he was willing to sell for, 
cash down, and the bigger it is, the better for 
him, the purchaser and the district." 
- "Have you had any trouble such as that you 
speak of ? " 

"Yes. There are half a dozen properties 
here which 1 should very much like to bond, 
and they show well on the surface and look very 
promising. If I could get a reasonable bond I 



would develop them, and my impression is that 
they would open up well enough to justify me 
in negotiating their sale. But I cannot afford 
to take any chances. One man in particular 
came to me and offered a property that im- 
pressed me most favorably. It has been idle for 
four years, and is likely to be idle for four 
more. He would take $15,000 in cash, or bond 
it for 60 days for 850,000. I told him I would 
bond it for six months for $25,000, and he in- 
dignantly left me. I have had a similar experi- 
ence a number of times during the past month, 
and the only thing for me to do is to go away 
and wait till next year." 

" Then you think that time will bring about 
a change ?" 

" I do. At least one of two things will hap- 
pen; either Butte will have a big boom this year 
or operations will continue to be conducted by 
the big companies now here, and little outside 
capital will be introduced. Within the next 
six weeks or two months a great many mining 
men will visit Butte because the fame of the 
camp is rapidly spreading, and it has a better 
reputation abroad and at home than any other 
American camp. These incoming capitalists 
will either buy mining properties at ruling 
prices or go away dissatisfied, refusing to invest 
a dollar. For myself, 1 concede the right to 
every prospect owner to get all he can for his 
ground. I should do the same; but since you 
asked me a pointed question about my success 
in Butte, I have seen fit to give in reply a plain 
statement of fact. 



Paradise Gold Minks. -J. M. Miller, in 
company with -T. S. Clapp, recently visited the 
mines in the vicinity of Paradise valley, and is 



The Harmon Seminary. 

We give a sketch of the Harmon Seminary for 
young ladies at Berkeley. The engraving al- 
though it hardly does justice to the pleasing de- 
tails of the buildings and surroundings gives an 
idea of the exterior features of the institution: 
The Seminary Building, which was erected in 
1SS2, is pronounced by all who visit it a model 
of excellent construction and tasteful finish. It 
was planned with special reference to its use as 
a Boarding and Day School for Young Women. 
It is a commodious , three - story, su burban 
villa. Its interior, aside from rooms for general 
use, has been arranged to secure a cluster of 
neat and cosy apartments, instead of the cheer- 
less dormitories which are too prevalent in 
boarding-school architecture. In both its ex- 
terior and its internal arrangement and furnish- 
ing, it presents the characteristics of a comfort- 
able and commodious private resilience, and the 
impression imparted to the pupil on entering is 
that of access to a home and not a public edi- 
fice. Thus the building is made to conform to 
the central idea of the institution, which is to 
combine the influences of a refined and cultured 
home with the discipline of the school and 
class-room. 

The Seminary is entrusted to the management 
of Rev. S. S. Harmon and Mrs. F. W. Har- 
mon, who have had an experience of more 
than twenty years in the education of young 
ladies in this State. The present institution 
embodies the results of their ripened judg 



Union Mining District. 

There are probably as many mines in this 
district on which nothing is being done as in 
any section of the State. Mines that, if prop- 
erly handled, ought to yield a large amount of 
the precious metals, and prove a source of profit 
to the parties operating them; but for some 
reason they are closed down, and are of no 
benefit to their owners or any one else. It is 
claimed by many that the patenting of a mine 
is generally the means of closing it down. The 
mines of lone have been shut down for years, 
and it is a well known fact that there is not 
one of them patented; the owners make a pre- 
tense of doing the assessment work necessary 
to hold them, and then lay back and refuse to 
sell for anything but fabulous prices. There 
are other sections of this district suffering from 
the same complaint. Mines are held by parties 
who won't work them themselves nor allow any 
one else to. 

The most extensively worked mine in this 
district was the Alexander, which in the course 
of a little over three years produced nearly 
a million and a half of dollars in silver. A little 
over one year and a half ago operations were 
stopped on this property, but the lack of ore 
was not the cause. Competent mining men say 
there is arr immensity of ore in sight, and, as 
yet, no depth U attained in the mine; that the 
ore goes down there is no doubt, and it is al- 
most certain that the ore bodies will show no 
decrease in size and richness. The Brooklyn 
also produced large quantities of good ore, but 
now it lies idle and unproductive; parties who 




THE HARMON SEMINARY. FOR YOUNG LADIES, BERKELEY. CAL. 
very much pleased with the prospects there. | wide observation and experience designated as 



The main leads so far worked on are the Eagle 
and the Vulture, situated about two miles in a 
southerly direction from the springs. He made 
a close examination of the Vulture. It crops 
out boldly for a distance of o'OO feet. The lode 
is well defined, and whenever work has been done 
shows a body of pay quartz from two to four 
and a half feet wide. He tried about 50 samples 
from different parts of the lead with a pros- 
pecting horn, and found it would work from $5 
up to $150 a ton, free gold, and he is satisfied 
that it will develop into a valuable property, 
with a small amount of capital judiciously in- 
vested. The formation is granite. The springs, 
which are owned by the Vulture Company, con- 
sist of three — two warm and one cold— and 
afford quite a supply of water, arr abundance for 
mining purposes, but there is no fuel there ex- 
cept about 100 mesquite trees, which offer a 
delightful shade. The distance from the Pio- 
neer Mill, at Hawley's station, is IS miles over 
a good road, which passes by Coyote Holes, 10 
miles from the station, where there is plenty of 
water. — GaUro Print. 

The Keely Motok Again. The president of 
the Keely Motor Stoek Company, Mr. Edward 
Randall, of Brooklyn, is one of the officials of 
the Erie railway, and he is a firm believer inthe 
successful application of the new power which 
he thinks Mr. Keely has discovered. "There 
is a discovery without any sort of doubt," he 
said yesterday ; how he is going to apply it is 
the only question which troubles us. The Erie 
engineer, Mr. Canute, says it is some new and 
to him mysterious motor, and he has been the 
generator repeatedly. We are now building," 
added Mr. Randall, "a locomotive of 500 horse 
power, with which we propose to draw a train 
of Pullman Palace cars from Philadelphia to 
this city." "At what time?' 1 "In August 
next." "And in what time?" "Ah!" that 
remains to be seen."— A 7 . Y, Tribune. 



ment in its plan and policy ami the aecommo- [ know say it has still got good bodres of pay ore 
lations and^arrarrgements are such as 'their I in it. Capitalists lookiug for mining proper- 
ties capable of pro- 
ducing large quan- 
tities of ore can 
find several in Un- 
ion mining dis- 
trict. The mines 
of lone alone, 
worked systemat- 
ically, are eapable 
of producing ore 
enough to make 
them dt vidend 
payers, but a mod- 
erate outlay of 
capital would he 
needed to open 
them so that ore 
could be taken 
out advantage- 
ously. John Cen- 
tras' mines, at 
Centrasville, are 
also well worthy 
the attention of 
those who are 
seeking a good in- 
vestment. In the 
leading mine there 
is a fine strong 
ledge carrying 
high grade ore. 
In Union canyon 
there are numer- 
ous prospects on 
which considerable 
work has been 
done that show 
more or less ore of 
a good grade. 

TheMcMahon& 
Irvine C. M. & M. 
company have re- 
sumed operations 
iu the < 'entennial. 
This mine has 
every indication of developing into one 
of the most valuable properties on the coast, 
but it will take coin to open it and make 
it a bullron producer. In the main tunnel ore of 
a high grade has been cut, and as the face of the 
tunnel is advanced, it continues to come in 
stronger. Preparations are beirrg made for the 
erection of a ten-stamp mill (with a capacity for 
twenty stamps) to reduce their ores. We sin- 
cerely hope that the efforts of the management 
will be crowned with success, and that the 
hearts of the stockholders may soon lie gladdened 
by the payment of regular monthly dividends 
for years to come. [Since writing the ajJoVe 
all operations have been suspended in the Cen- 
tennial mine and the work of grading stopped 
for the mill, for what reasoir we know rrot. 
One thing is certain, however, the mine looks 
vastly better now than at the time machinery 
for the mill was ordered. If it is the intention 
of this company to open their urine in a thor- 
ough and systematic manner-, and work it for 
what it contains, and not as a stock gamble, 
they can rest assured it will take capital to do 
it. Starting up a property and running it for a 
few days and then closing it down, not only 
hurts the reputation of the mine but does serious 
damage to every other mining property in its' 
vicinity.]— Grantsville Bonanza. 



most desirable. It is not an ambition of 
this school to bring together a large and im- 
posing array of pupils. Its numbers are lim- 
ited; henee, each pupil receives that close per- 
sonal attention a,nd instruction rendered im- 
possible where multitudes are gathered togeth- 
er. The institution is well supplied with in- 
structors in the common branches, and thor- 
ough work is done. In the special 
branches of music, art and languages, 
the masters are among the most emi- 
nent in the State. The courses of in- 
struction are various and include all degrees 
of advancement from the kindergarten upward. 
The regular course leads to the diploma of the 
Seminary. There is a special course for those 
wlro desire to enter the State University, and 
special courses, also, for those who desire to 
advance themselves in music, the arts or litera- 
ture. The range of instruction is very broad, 
and, in addition to the matters usual in similar 
schools, it has practical instruction in floricul- 
ture and horticulture for those who desire it; 
and in silk culture, which is now becoming 
prominent as a household industry in this 
State. 

The seminary closed a very successful year on ' 
May 30th, and the next term will open ( 
July '20th. 



Danger. — Every person must try to learn 
what dangers are connected with his trade or 
profession and how they may be avoided. Some 
of these dangers are dust, lead, quicksilver, 
arsenic, coal-gas, carbonic acid gas (found in 
wine and beer cellars), and the poison of dead 
bodies and sick animals. — Wolfberg* 



It is sagaciously noted that to determine the 
value of building stone a ramhle among the 
tombs is wise. In far fewer years than most 
imagine monuments are in decay. 



Selfishness and Happiness cannot flourish 
on the same stem. He who cares only for him 
self never finds what he seeks; he grows nar- 
row, stunted and mean, and becomes av length 
incapable of any but the meanest enjoyment. 
It is as if he were surrounded by' flowing 
streams, and, though athirst, has not the power- 
to drink of them. It is only the man of gener- 
ous impulses who can know what real happiness 
is; but to develop these impulses in the light 
direction and make them truly valuable toman- 
kind, thoughtful intelligence and wise discre- 
tion are indispensable, 



July ?, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



Better Metallurgical Methods. 

The in* t.illi.: 

required bj I 
tiun .iin I importance >■!' the mining industry, 
This position 

[act that scientific men ha* n Dot given thesubjeot 
the attention which its importance demands, 

and thi c lucted, to ;i large 

extent, it :i ramote distance Erom business 
and tin- presence of skillful and well 
informed men. Dnder the present met] 
element of toss istoo great - ■ "f time 

and valuable material. In many localities the 
imitive methods and agencie are in use 
in the reduction "i ores; appliances that show 
no improvement in the whole liistorj of mining 
for cent i 

in almost iii\ othei department of the min- 
ing industry, especially in the working of mines, 
n mark' apparent. The 

■ 
. the improved explosives, and all the 
[or mining the ore, sh< 
resemblance to those in ose evens tew 
go. As mining con < more a 

productive industry, and is operated in a legiti- 
mate manner, lopmento! mineral re- 
onditiou of facilities and I 

t present processes for the 
. ast demand attention and 
compel o revolution in means and methods, 
mini J ol I he country is es- 
timated Erom the portion of mineral that ap- 
pears in the channels of industrial and eomiuer- 

cial activity. If to this utilized portioi Id 

be tdded that which has been lost between tin; 
mouth i in. I the bullion mould, the 

.result v igly different, Esti- 

i in ■, I lepartment show a de- 
produced in ' Jalifornia, dur- 
ing tli.- past year, amounting to $1,000,000. 
We will venture to .statu that it is more than 
probable that tin- tailings of mill ami Hume 
have borne away more than live times that 
amount within the year, ami the annual 1<>sm of 
precious minerals, under present methods oi 
lent, would more than pay the cost of all 
investments made. Under careful management 
the waste dump, slag pile ami tailings, even 
with prevalent means, have, in many instances, 
riven better results than the mine from which 
the ores were taken. This ruinous factor of 
waste must be eliminated before the problem of 
successful milling be definitely solved. Mining, 
grand 08 is her present showing, never can be 
truly estimated in the full measure of her 
magnificent resources until this vampire of loss 
shall releaseits paralyzing grasp. I<l<<h,, II orld. 



An Electric Sluice Box. 

We witnessed this morning the operation of 
a new style of sluice box, to be used on mill 
tailings and in washing gravel The appliance 
is a new one, the patent on which has been ap- 
plied for by C. H, Wetzel and F.J. Taylor. 
The sluice box used is the ordinary shape and 
size, in the bottom of which are arranged 
wedge-shaped riffles, two abreast, but with 
the ends reversed in every set. The rilllcs are 
i ;icli about a foot lon^, and all are covered with 
i sheet «>f zinc and copper, the copper being 
next to the wood. The copper plate has the 
zinc fastened toitso that the zinc is not allowed 
to touch either the riffles or the side of the box. 
In this way it is claimed that an electric cur- 
rent is generated that precipitates and catches 
all mineral in solution passing off in the tailings, 
and at the same time a stronger affinity is 
created between the mineral in its natural 
state and the plates, The reversed motion 
given the water and pulp in its pas 
sage through the sluice box, by means 
of the alternated wedge-shaped riffles, 
will, it is contended, bring every particle 
of mineral in transit in direct contact with 
plates; which, being charged with both elec- 
tricity and quicksilver, will seize and hold the 
same. There is also svispended in the sluice 
box a small wheel with copper arms that are 
also charged. The current of water passing 
underneath this wheel revolves it, thus again 
bringing a charged copper surface in contact 
with the " slimes," and floating mineral in the 
water. Those two latter substances have baf- 
fled the efforts of mill men in times past to suc- 
cessfully work them. At the end of the sluice 
box is arranged a reservoir, copper-lined, into 
which all the pulp is emptied. In the center of 
the reservoir a gate is placed that prevents any 
pulp from running oft' into the waste pipe until 
it has been churned and brought in contact 
with the metal lining, which gives the appara- 
tus still another chance to seize what mineral 
may have avoided contact above. Mr. Taylor 
is making a test of the invention on 
tailings at the Centennial mill, and a number 
of mining and milling men who have witnessed 
its operation have high opinions of its merits 
and speak confidently of its success, —Intc 
Mountain, (Btttf<-, M. T.) 



Huw Tea is Adulterated. 

The Sew V'ork Tea App Dropleted 

the i i » \ estigation ol the . . brought 
to this countr) by the Flintshire, and found 

that a large proportion ■ •! ululter 

ated. Me to-day pi report to the 

Collector, showing that he had rejected 3,100 

packages, which if sold in the market might 

have there tvali/ed al t 122,000 I 

I nil colors, bUos and de- 
scriptions, -oim- of whiej, \v. re mixed with 

ome with gravel, others c a 

i nd still othi i 

Oi dirt and paste rolled nil., i 

Above t'i\ r hundred | i Japan 

dust were also rejected on the ground 

color ami the admixture of mine] tl m< 

intended to make tl ; r in Weight. 

I 

rd th i lintshire. 

Tin- < lollQctoi ■'ml Appra ■ port of 

St. I, mils have Forw ardi d to Da vi.- lamples oi 

■ -it ti. this city bi ^ ay of San 

Francisco. The examination has clearly shown 

that the stuff was onl} wild leaves, indiscrim 

inatelv collected and dried and sent to this 

country to be palmed <>ir as tea. This was in- 
tended t" be sent to a part of the country re- 
mote from the regular markets, and there dis- 
posed of :i> tea, regardless ojf the fact whether 
or not it was an injury to consumers. DavieB 

Baid this rning that th.- new crop now ar- 

rii inj overland appeared to be of good quality. 

To Measure tmk Flow 0¥ Streams.— The 
Manufacturer "><<i Builder gives the following 
very simple method: To measure water roughly 

in an Open stream, take from four to twelve dif- 
fe i'ii t ] 11 lints in a straight line, across the 
stream, and measure tin- depth at each of these 
points, and, adding them together, divide by 
the number of measurements taken. This 
quotient will give you the average depth, which 
should be measured in feet. Multiply this 
Eiverage depth by the width in feet, and this 
will give you the square feet of cross section of 
the stream. Multiply this by the velocity of 
the stream in feet, per minute, and you will 
have the cubic feet, per minute, of the stream. 
The velocity of the stream can be found by lay- 
ing off 100 feet on the bank, and then throwing 
a board into the stream at the middle, note the 
time required to pass over the 100 feet, and 
dividing the 100 feet by the time and multiply- 
ing by sixty gives the velocity in feet, per min- 
ute, at the surface. The velocity at the cen- 
ter is only eighty-three per cent of that at the 
surface, and so only eighty-three per centshould 
be calculated. For example, suppose the float 
passes 100 feet in ten seconds, this, divided by 
ten and multiplied by sixty, (seconds in a min- 
ute) gives GOO feet, per minute, as the velocity, 
and eighty three per cent of this gives 498 feet, 
per minute, as the velocity of the stream at the 
center, and the area of the cross -section, multi- 
plied by this, will give the number of cubic feet 
per minute, in the stream. 

On: Birhs. — It would be well if a little more 
information were imparted in our schools on the 
subject of our birds, song birds especially, for 
the amount of good work done by insect -eating 
birds is something wonderful. A writer in 
Good Words gives an illustration of the enor- 
mous appetite of the bird. A thrush will eat 
at a meal the largest snail that England pro- 
duces. If a man could eat as much in propor- 
tion, he would consume a whole round of beef 
for his dinner. The redbreast, again, is a most 
voracious bird. It has been calculated that to 
keep a redbreast up to his normal weight, an 
amount of animal food is required daily equal to 
an earthworm 14 feet in length. Taking a man 
of average weight, and measuring bulk for bulk 
with the redbreast, and assuming a sausage nine 
inches in circumference to be a fair equivalent 
of the earthworm, it is found that the man 
would have to eat 67 feet of such sausage in every 
twenty-four hours. By these two examples it 
will he seen what slayers of insects our birds 
are, and it seems almost beyond belief that 
they should be slain. If information such as 
the above were more widely disseminated, we 
should hear less of the practice, injurious as it 
is wanton, of bird's-nesting and bird-catching, 
in which boys and young men take only too 
much delight. 



ehanm pipes of the first quality, and 

into any article m.w made ■■! i 

on t" the following treatment: Having 
bean carefully peeled and Buffered extraction ol 
its "eyas,*' the potaf ■ 

hours in a mixture of sulphuric acid and water, 
after which it must Ik- Squeezed in a press until 

mired moisture i> ex 

from it. The residuum of tins simple 

process is declared to lie a hard block .-f a deli 

'•my. white 1 suitable 

to the manufacture of ornamental and artisti- 
cally executed pipe In ■ lay, and 

For brush and um- 
brella handles, billiard balls, fans and oneSB- 
llieli. 

Hold Glass —There appears to be quite a 

; ' ''to by manufacturers upon novelties in 

expensive gold and silver artistic glass. The 

pD Webb, of tie 1 Dal 

burn Hill Olass Works, Stourbridge, have en 
tered the lists, and have hi hat they 

New I iold Class." It is made in 
various ornamental shapes for the drawing 
room. The suit. j. -i ba q crumpled appearance, 

colored with gold, which is worked into it in the 

manufacture. The gold Burface i- not 

!m bi compared to gilding, it being, as it were, 

a top layer of the glass, and is brought in Com- 
bination with different colored bodies. Some 
are worked out in green, and others in amber 
glass The elevation of the crumpled shapes 

admits the light through, which throws up the 
tinge and adds to the effect. This linn also 
makes a specialty of glass furniture. 

A PLASTIC m \ss, which is valuable for many 
purposes, is made under a recent German pat- 
ent, by well mixing, in equal proportions, 
ground calcined and paste magnetite, and a so- 
lution of sulphate of magnesia of 1.9 specific 
gravity, and running the mixture into oiled 
molds. The mass can be washed with warm 
soap and water, when hardened and will have 
the appearance of white marble, the hard- 
ness of which it also acquires with time. This 
new substance is called "marmorin." 



Messrs. Wm. T. Coleman & Co., of San 
Francisco, have purchased the defunct Stand- 
ard Soap Co. 'shoe plant at Alameda Point, 
which they will use as a borax factory to refine 
the crude mineral from the Death Valley 
mines. 



TnuSau Francisco Minim: and Scientific 
Press speaks favorably of the substitution of 
silver for iron in making shoes and dies for 
amalgamating pans. It has been tried in this 
Territory with good results. Pnscolt Courier. 



Paint for Boiler Fronts and Smoke 

Stacks.— The Manufacturer and Built la /-recom- 
mends the use of the Silico-graphic paint, so 
called. It is furnished already mixed, and may 
be further thinned down with oil when desired 
thinner. The practice reported by one of the 
master-mechanics at the Hornellsville shops of 
the Krie Railway Co., on locomotive smoke 
stacks, it strikes us, would be useful to follow 
in the case of boiler fronts. His practice is to 
rub the paint into the ir«on with waste, and, 
sift over it some finely powdered blacklead, and 
polish briskly with a brush. The result is re- 
ported to be a rich, glossy, smooth black sur- 
face, which will not burn off, and is very 
durable. 



The Evil Effects of Tobacco. 

Many years ago Dr. Wm. A.-Aloott pub- 

I- litth- work Mil the "l'b>- 

Bical, Intellectual and Moral Kffecteoi Toh ce 

on the Human System." That work h 

been revised, with notes and additi 

son SUer, and published by 1'owkr A Wells, ol 

753 Broadway, New York, in the new addi 
tiou Mr. Sizer has added a sufficient amount of 

matter to nearly double the 3120 of the book 

and has brought the information and the facts 
bearing on the subject down to the present time. 
It shows th.- effects of the tobacco on th 
on the voice, and oi ■'■■■■ 

•iie appetite and digestion, and 
leads to various discs 
tellect and morals, and points out who a 

fering most fr.nu its use. . t.» t<. 

bacco is discussed in an extended and 'interest 
Ing account, giving th" history ami conf 

■ ■ / he gave 

up the habit. An interesting histor; 
smoker is given, showing th.- great benefits hu 
derived from quitting its use. This work should 

be in the hands of those who wish to have pie 

Bented i ible waj ol overcoming tin hain't, 

as it is shown that the greatest slave of tobacco 
may lean, [ion to give it up without much 

difficulty, or the feeling of nervous loss, and so 

become thoroughly restored to self- mastership 

and health; and especially should it be placed 

in the hands of the boys, and of moderate 
who have not yet fully acquired the 
habit. Its arguments are convincing, and we 
know of no better use that can be made of -■"> 
cents than to send it to the publishers of this 
little l'<">k, and on receipt of the amount in 
postage stamps they will send it to any address 
by mail, post paid. 



Covering Fabrics With a Film ok Tin. — 
A recent French process consists in permeating 
fabrics with a solution of tin. A mixture of 
zinc powder and dissolved albumen is first made, 
and spread over the fabric with a brush, and, 
after drying, the stuff is passed first through 
superheated steam, then through a solution of 
chloride tin. In this way an exceedingly thin 
layer of tin is spread over the whole side of the 
fabric, which is thus rendered waterproof, and 
protected against ordinary rough usage. 



GfooD Health. 



New Vse for the Potato.— If what the 
Agricultural Gazette, of Vienna, gravely states 
is true, Ireland may potentially possess a gi- 
gantic fortune in her ability to raise innumera- 
ble potatoes. That paper says that the humble 
but indispensable tuber may lie transformed 



Hints on Sleep. 

The question of chief importance to most peo- 
ple in these overwrought, wakeful days and 
nights is how to get good sleep enough. Dr. 
Corning drops a few simple bints which may be 
of value. In the first place, people should have 
a regular time for going to sleep, and it should 
be as soon as can well be after sunset. People 
who sleep at anytime, according to convenience, 
get less benefit from their sleep than others; 
getting sleep becomes more difficult; there is a 
tendency to nervous excitability and derange- 
ment; the repair of the system does not equal 
the waste. The more finely organized people 
are, the greater the infhculty and the danger 
from this cause. The first thing in order to 
sleep well is to go to bed at a regular hour, and 
make it as early as possible. The next thing 
is to exclude all worry and exciting subjects of 
thought from the mind some time before retir- 
ing. The body and mind must be let down 
from the high-pressure strain before going to 
bed, so that nature can assert her rightful su- 
premacy afterward. Another point is, never 
to thwart the drowsy impulse when it comes at 
the regular time by special efforts to keep 
awake, for this drowsiness is the advance guard 
of healthy, restorative sleep. 

Sleep is a boon which must not be tampered 
with and put off, for if "compelled to wait, it is 
never so perfect and restful as if taken its own 
natural time and way. The right side is the 
best to sleep on, except in special cases of dis- 
ease, and the position should be nearly horizon- 
tal. Finally, the evening meal should be 
composed of food most easily digested and as- 
similated, so that the stomach will have little 
hard work to do. A heavy, rich dinner taken 
in the evening is one of the things that murder 
sleep. Late suppers with exciting foods and 
stimulating drinks make really restorative sleep 
next to impossible. Narcotics are to be avoided, 
save as used in cases of disease by competent 
physicians. The proper time, according to Dr. 
Corning, to treat sleeplessness is in the day- 
time, and it must be treated by a wise and tem- 
perate method of living rather than by medi- 
cines. This is good common sense, says the 
New York Star, from which paper we copy, 
and doubtless a vast deal of the debility, nerv- 
ous derangement, and the insanity of our time 
would be prevented by more good, restful, nat- 
ural sleep. 

Mosqtjkto Oil. — The following is a very 
good mixture for anointing the face and hands 
while fishing: Oil of tar, 1 oz. ; olive oil, 1 oz; 
oil of pennyroyal, ^ oz. ; spirit of camphor, \ 
oz. ; glycerine, £ oz. ; carbolic acid, 2 drachms. 
Mix, and shake well before using. 



How to Remove Black Worms From the 
Face.- \ contemporary says: The black points, 

flesh worms, or comedones, which arc found in 
the face, and especially near the nostrils, are 
not at all produced by the accumulation ol the 
particles of dirt or dust, as has generally been 
believed, but by pigmentary matter, which 
is soluble in acids. The following treatment 
has been recommended: kaoline, four parts; 
glycerine, three parts; acetic acid, two parts, 
with or without the addition of a small quantity 
of some ethereal oil. With this pomade cover 
the parts affected in the evening, and if need 
be, during the day. After several days all the 
comedones can be easily expressed; most of 
them even come out by washing the parts with 
pumice stone soap. The same results can be 
obtained by bandaging the parts affected for a 
longtime with vinegar, lemon juice, or diluted 
hydrochloric acid. The acids act like cosmet- 
ics, as they transform the black color into a 
brown and yellow shade, and destroy it gradu- 
ally altogether. 

Poison in Potatoes. — No person should buy 
their potatoes of groeerymen who let them stand 
in front of their stores in the sun. Potatoes be- 
longing to the "Solanum" family, of which the 
deadly night shade is one of its full brothers. 
All branches of the family contain more or less 
of that poisonous narcotic, called "solanine." 
The bulb, or potato, contains the least of this, 
unless they are exposed to the sun, which rap- 
idly develops this element. Long exposure to 
the light, without the direct sun, will develop 
the solanine in the potato, and make an article 
unfit for food. But exposure to the sun is so 
injurious to the potato, making it not only un- 
palatable, but actually injurious to health, that 
any grocer for the offence of selling potatoes 
which have been exposed two or three days to 
the sun ought to be indicted for selling un- 
healthy and dangerous human food.- -Albany 
Journal. 



Chloroforming Through Keyholes', etc. 

— We read now and then of cases in which 
burglars are supposed to have rendered their 
victims unconscious by holding cloths wet with 
chloroform to keyholes before entering an apart- 
ment. Of course the absurdity of such a fiction 
is sufficiently apparent. Whether sleepers can 
be made to pass from natural to chloroform 
sleep, if the chloroform is held near to the face, 
is still. a question. Sometimes the experiment 
has succeeded, bat in rive experiments recently 
made to determine the fact, every one of the 
sleepers experimented upon woke at the expi- 
ration of three minutes, before they had come 
under the influence of the drug. 



Prevention of Boils. — A St. Petersburg 

physician, Dr. Sieveu, commends a very simple 
treatment for the prevention of this 
very painful form of abscess. He claims 
that if the skin be superficially scraped 
with a knife, so that a drop or two of 
blood may be pressed through the epidermis as 
soon as the peculiar stabbing or pricking sensa 
tion and slight induration announce the com- 
mencement of the boil, it will not be further 
devoloped. 

Go»N and Wart Core. — Gezou's remedy for 
corns and warts is prepared as follows: Acid 
salicylic, 30 grains; extract cannabis indie, 10 
grains; collodion, one-half ounce M. A corre- 
spondent of the Britixh Medical Journal states 
that he has found the application of a strong so- 
lution of chromic acid, applied three or four 
times a day with a camel's hair pencil, to be 
the most easy and efficient way of removing 
warts. They soon become hinds and fall orl'. 



Mining and 'Scientific Press. 



fui.y 7, 1S83 




A. T. DEWEY W. B. EWER. 

DEWEY & CO., Publishers. 



Office, 252 Market St., N. E. comer Front St. 
/®~ Take the Elevator, iVo. 13 Front St. *Si 



\V. B. EWER Senior Editor 



Address editorials and business letters to the fin 
individuals are liable to be absent. 



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Entered at S. F. Post Office as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. 
DEWEY & CO., Patent Solicitors. 

A. T. DEWEY. W. 11. EWER. C H. STRONG 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday Morning, June 7, 1S83. 



TAELE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS.— Beach Mining for Gold; New Shap- 
ing Machine; Advancement of Science, 1. Passing 
Events; A New Industry; Blunders in Mining; New 
Wet Ore Separator; Lead Smelting; Powder or Lime for 
Masting, £$. itoasting am! ( 'liloi'iiiizing Furnace; Min- 
ing Patents; Working in Bad Air in Mines, 9. 

ILLUSTRATIONS. -Apparatus Used for Gold Beacli 
Mining in Australia; San Francisco Tool Company's 
New Shaping Machine. 1- The Harmon Seniiiutn for 
5Toung Ladies, Berkeley, Cal., 6. Kevin's Ore Roasting 
and Chloridizing Furnace. 9. 

CORRESPONDENCE.- Howells-A New Town, 2- 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS.-Solid and Hollow 
Iron Columns; Visibility of Ruled Lines; The Treatment 
of Cement; The Origin of Waterspouts; Stopping En- 
gines by Electricity; The Best Material for Joists; Alu- 
minum Coated Iron; Wasting Oil; Pulleys; Marble 
Veneers, 3. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.-Progress of Flectric 
Science; Absorption of Oxygen by Iron Cement; The 
Radiation of Silver in Solidifying; To Determine the 
Heating Power of Coal; Singular Explosions; To Re- 
move the Odor from Petroleum; Origin of the Universe, 
3. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.-Sales at the San 
Francisco Stock Board, Notices of Meetings, Assess- 
ments, Dividends and Bullion Shipments, 4. 

MINING SUMMARY- From the various counties 
of California, Nevada, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New 
Mexico, Oregon and Utah, 4-5. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.-How Tea is Adulte- 
rated; To Measure the Flow of Streams; Our Birds; 
Paint for Boiler Fronts and Smoke Stacks; New Use for 
the Potato; Cold Class; Covering Fabrics with a Film 
of Tin, 7. 

GOOD HEALTH.- Hints on Sleep; Mosquito Oil; 
The Evil Effects of Tobacco; How to Remove Black 
Worms from the Face; Poison in Potatoes; Chloroform- 
ing Through Keyholes; Prevention of Boils; Corn and 
Wort Cure, 7- 

NEWS IN BRIEF-On page 12 and other pages. 

MISCELLANEOUS.- Wood River Bullion; The Sil- 
ver King Mine at < lalico, 2- High Prices for Prospects; 
The Harmon Seminary; Union Mining District, 6- 
Better Metallurgical Methods; An Electric Sluice Box, 7 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Assessment Notice— Seaton Gold Mining Co., S. F 
Plumbers' Materials— San Francisco Brass Works. 
Dividend Notice— Standard Con. Mining Co., S. F. 
St. Mary's Hall— Rev. L. D. Mansfield, Benicia, Cal 
Mining Engineer— B, Salazar, San Francisco. 



Passing Events. 

This has been rather an "off" week. The 
national holiday coining in the middle of it has 
caused a cessation of business, many persons 
taking a three days' holiday. News from the 
mines is somewhat meager, also. 

More attention seems to be paid just now to 
the Idaho and Montana mining regions than 
anywhere else. Many immigrants are coming 
into those territories, and no doubt hundreds of 
new mines will be opened this summer. Ore- 
gon and Washington are also attracting many, 
but that population is more of an agricultural 
one. .Southwestern Nevada is being opened up 
in a rational manner now, and the extension 
of railroad facilities is developing a wide region. 
Part of this State is greatly benefited also. In 
Storey county, the great mining center, pros- 
pecting operations are going on, but no devel- 
opments of importance have been made. Utah 
is at present, in bullion production, doing very 
good work. 



It is stated in a Montana paper that some 
excellent prospects are found in the country 
bordering the Yellowstone river. At the head 
of Emigrant gulch, one of the' richest auriferous 
gulches worked in the country, several claims 
have been located. The Great Eastern is the 
name of a mammoth vein, 100 feet between tlie 
walls, with a fourteen foot pay streak. The 
owners are about to begin taking out ore and 
can keep an 80-ton smelter busy with a small 
force of men, 



A New Industry. 

Metallurgy of Nickel. 
Mr. George J. Rockwell, of this city, has 
recently made the first bar of nickel ever pro- 
duced on the Pacific Coast directly from the 
ore by one single process. The ore worked was 
of low grade (4A per cent of nickel) but the 
process employed showed that ore of this 
quality could be worked practically and eco- 
nomically on a large scale. Mr. Rockwell has 
applied for a patent on his process, and is now 
engaged in prosecuting his experiments so as to 
include other ores of nickel. 

Nickel occurs in the form of sulphides, ar- 
senides, arseno -sulphides, antimono-sulphides, 
a sulphate, carbonate, silicates, arsenate; it also 
occurs in meteorites. These compounds 
are of various colors, namely:- brass- 
yellow, tin-white, steel-gray, pale copper-red, 
rose color, apple-green; the latter color often 
confounding the mineral with copper carbon- 
ate. The following blowpipe test will serve to 
isolate nickel from other metallic oxides. 
Blowpipe Test for "Nickel. 
Roast a quantity of the pulverized ore 
thoroughly on charcoal in the oxidizing flame to 
remove any sulphur, arsenic or antimony that 
may be present. 

Dissolve a very small quantity of this roasted 
ore in a borax bead on a loopcf platinum wire 
in the oxidizing flame and observe the color 
produced; oxide of nickel alone, in the absence 
of other metallic oxides, colors the glass red- 
dish-brown. Saturate the bead with the roasted 
ore and shake it oti' into a small dish. Treat this 
bead on charcoal with a small piece of silver or 
gold, in a strong, reducing (yellow) flame. 
Lead may be used instead. Iron, manganese, 
cobalt, etc., remain in the bead, while nickel, 
copper, etc., are reduced and collected by the 
silver or gold button. Remove the button 
from the bead by breaking the latter on an 
anvil between paper. Treat the button on 
charcoal in the oxidizing flame with a salt of 
phosphorus (phosphate of soda and ammonia) 
bead, removing it while the bead is hot. 

If nickel and copper are present, the bead 
will be green when cold; if nickel only, yel- 
low; if copper only, blue. 

Pacific Coast Kickel. 
Nickel has recently been found in several 
places on this coast. In Oregon there is a large 
deposit of silicate of magnesia and nickel, tech- 
nically known as Garnierite; this ore, which 
will not average more than five per cent, of 
nickel, nevertheless carries more than some 
which are worked profitably. Very large and 
valuable deposits of this metal, also, occur in 
several localities in Nevada. One of these de- 
posits which is being rapidly developed prom- 
ises to be the principal mine of nickel on this 
coast; the ore averages 20% and several tons 
have been sent to Europe and realized a hand- 
soras profit over all expenses. It is expected 
that Mr. Rockwell's improvement will make it 
possible to reduce this ore at home and thus 
avoid the duty of 15 cents per lb. on the im- 
ported metal. 

Nevada, which has already showered into our 
laps her millions of silver, wiU now add a new 
source of wealth to this coast. 

The annual consumption of nickel in 1S70 
was about 600 tons, but the recent discovery of 
Dr. Fleitmann of Germany, who has succeeded 
in rendering it malleable will introduce it for 
many purposes hitherto impracticable owing to 
its brittleness. 

Blunders in Mining. 

Some of the old mining errors are still being 
committed. People occasionally now build 
quartz mills before they are sure of having a 
mine. Then also they begin working their ore 
when they try a mine with some new, untried 
process, and try to develop a mine and process 
both at once. One is generally enough for 
ordinary people to attend to. A common 
blunder is to judge a mine by a rich specimen. 
The existence of rich specimens is not proof of 
the high value of a mine. Among experienced 
miners this excites distrust. As a general 
proposition, pocket lodes are not very profit- 
able, though sometimes of course they yield 
large amounts. Sinking deep shafts when 
nothing is found of value on the surface is in 
gold mining very risky. Crushing a lot of rock 
Without selection or proper consideration of its 
value is a common blunder too; as is also 



failure to make assays of the tailings to see 
what is passing off. 

Trying to run a mine by letter and not by 
personal presence is pretty often a losing oper 
tion. The business requires the supervision of 
competent men, but when competent men are 
found they should not be hampered. Absentees 
can never judge so well as those persons right 
on the ground. 

Perhaps the most frequent error and that 
which has led many times to disastrous results 
is in supposing any one can run a mine. Be- 
cause a man has money enough to buy a mine, 
or luck enough to find one, it by no means 
follows that he can manage it properly, Nor 
is it a reason when a rich man owns a lot of stock 
that "a lot of his relations can run a mine better 
than old miners. Sending out inexperienced 
men from the East, putting in storekeepers, 
sailors, salesmen, drummers, etc., as resident 
managers; and trusting the ignorance of those 
they knew rather than the knowledge of those 
they did not know, has brought many a mining 
investor to grief. 

When one sees these old blunders being 
repeated again and again, he thinks it strange 
inexperienced people don't employ proper 
persons to inform them what to do, rather 
than squander money, gaining experience on 
subjects already well understood by thousands. 



New Wet Ore Separator. 

Miles B. Dodge, of this city, has just re- 
ceived through the Mining and Scientific 
Press Patent Agency a patent for an im- 
proved separator for wet ores. The apparatus 
is intended for the concentration of valuable 
metals and sulphurets from the gangue. The 
invention consists in the construction and 
arrangement of a conical water pan, a centrally 
placed cylinder and piston, a surrounding screen 
to receive the ore, and novel feeding and dis 
tribnting devices, all operated by connected 
mechanism. 

The apparatus in general consists of a conical 
pan or receptacle having a cylinder supported 
centrally and above the bottom, and around 
this cylinder a horizontal screen extending 
across the top of the pan with flanges or rims 
extending a short distance above it. Within 
the cylinder a plunger moves vertically, being 
operated by suitable mechanism, and water is 
admitted into the pan from below, filling it, so 
that the sudden downward movement of the 
plunger will force the water up through the 
screen and lift the body of ore upon it, so that 
the heavier, valuable portions will settle through 
the screen while the lighter material will 
be kept at the top and will run off over 
the outer rim when it has reached a sufficient 
hight, being assisted by revolving plows or 
scrapers which travel just inside the rim. The 
material is fed into a hopper surrounding the 
central shaft, having holes in the bottom which 
discharge upon a conical distributor, at the bot- 
tom of which are openings to allow the material 
to pass through upon the screen as the dis- 
tributer revolves. 

The operation is as follows: The screen bed 
being properly supplied with ore, and water be- 
ing admitted into the pan through the supply 
pipe until it is full, the machine is set in motion, 
when the piston will be lifted by inclined teeth, 
or cams upon suitable disks, and will be forced 
suddenly downward by a spring as often as it 
is raised and released from the cam, thus forc- 
ing the water up through the screen among the 
ore on the surface. The effect of this intermit- 
tent rush of water up through tire screen is to 
cause the lighter portions to rise to the top and 
eventually to flow over the outer rim into the 
waste chute, and through it to any desired point 
of discharge. The heavier particles will settle 
upon and through the screen into the water in 
the pan, and flowing down its sides will escape 
through the discharge opening. Plows or scrap- 
ers on the arms of the distributing cone assist 
in discharging the waste material over the outer 
edge of the screen. The stroke of the piston 
may be regulated. 

A Governor as a Miser. — The Eureka Sen- 
tinel says: Last November Governor Adams 
purchased at auction, for a song, the personal 
property of the old Lemmon mill. When he 
was here, recently, he made arrangements with 
"Scotty," the well-known teamster, to haul it to 
Reveille, to his Gila mill. Yesterday 31,450 
pounds of the freight were loaded up, and Hey- 
worth started with a part of it, and "Seotty" 
follows with the rest of it to-day. The Govern- 
or has several thousand tons of tailings from the 
Gila mine, which will go over S30 per ton. The 
freight is composed of a White furnace, which 
will be put up at the mill for the purpose of 
roasting the tailings. 



Lead Smelting. 

For easily smelted ores, carrying a high per- 
centage of lead, the Belgian smelting process is 
a good one. The furnaces greatly resemble the 
Flintshire, except the Belgian has two fire- 
places — one at each end — and the hearth, in- 
stead of being concave as the Flintshire, slightly 
inclines at an angle, from both fire-places to- 
ward the center. The object of the two fire- 
places is to economize fuel and afford a greater 
uniformity of temperature. The charge remains 
in the furnace 16 hours. Two workmen only 
are employed. 

When the furnace is first charged, the tem- 
perature is kept for about half an hour at a red 
heat. At the end of this time the charge is 
worked, with short intermissions, for six hours, 
the temperature being raised toward the last to 
a cherry red heat. Molten lead now appears; 
the doors are closed and the temperature raised. 
In about four hours, during which time the ore 
is turned every half hour, lead ceases to flow, 
when powdered charcoal and lime are mixed 
with the charge to make it pasty and to re- 
duce the oxides .and sulphates which are 
formed. The charge is heated(being repeatedly 
worked) for about four hours longer, great care 
being taken that the temperature does not rise 
above a certain limit, lest other metals should 
also be reduced. 

Tire dross is now subjected to an increased 
temperature for one-half to three-quarters of an 
hour, whereby it is agglomerated. It is then 
withdrawn from the furnace and smelted in a 
low-blast furnace, with slag from the smelting 
of the impure ores, dross from the lead refin- 
ing furnace, and agglomerated fumes from the 
condensing chambers. The object in thusslow- 
ly roasting the ore, and conducting the reaction 
process by a low temperature, is manifold. 
With ore containing much copper and anti- 
mony, their reduction is avoided by the com- 
paratively low temperature, and on the first 
reaction period the lead is not only purer, but 
holds most of the silver in the ore, and as the 
operation ceases when the lead iir the dross 
reaches 60 per cent, the volatilization of lead is 
diminished. The loss of lead amounts to about 
five per cent. The amount of dross is great 
but the combined losses occurring both in the 
reverberatory, and the following smelting in 
a low-blast furnace is much smaller than it 
would be were the reduction originally carried 
on to greater extent in the reverberatory fur- 
nace. 

Powder or Lime for Blasting. 

AVe have several times noticed the experi- 
ments that are going on with relation to the 
use of lime for blasting in fiery coal mines. 
Not long since we gave a description of the way 
the process is carried nut. Mining engineers 
in studying up the subject should not only con- 
sider the question of cost in coal mining, but also 
that of life-saving. It seems all the inquiry is 
as to cost alone; but the miners' lives should 
be considered as well. Still, as to cost, some 
comparative results are now obtainable with 
lime cartridges in place of wedging for twelve 
months at the Shipley collieries. It must be 
understood that in working the deep hard coal 
at these pits no shovels arc allowed in the stalls, 
and only such of the small coal as can be picked 
up by the hand is sent to bank, the rest being 
thrown back into the gob. The quantity of 
coal produced per acre by the use of lime cart- 
ridges is seventeen per cent greater than from 
those stalls where wedging is still practiced. 
No comparision is made with the cost of powder, 
as no powder has been used here for twenty- 
five years. 

In Belgium, the result of six months' work 
ing at "Hasard" collieries gives an increased 
percentage of large of from twenty to twenty- 
five per cent, and an increase selling price of 
from one and a half to two francs per ton after 
allowing one-half franc for additional labor in 
undercutting to prepare the coal better for the " 
action of the lime cartridges. 

There has been great delay in getting efficient 
machinery made for the factories which will 
shortly be erected in different parts of the 
kingdom. When these manufactories are in 
working order the large number of collieries 
now awaiting to adopt the system will be in a 
position to give more extended information. 

Galena, Idaho, has a good smelter, but the 
miners are anxious to sell their mines and indif- 
ferent about extracting the ores, and the smelter 
is standing still this summer for- want of ore to 
smelt. Other localities are pursuing the same 
eonrse. 



July 7, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



Roasting and Chloridizing Furnace. 

Robert A. Kevin, o! tins oifty, hat a patent 
on an improved roasting andohloridizing furnace, 

l to work low grade n U 

X*i\d and silver quickly and cheaply with 

It or loss of precious metals. The 

bow the form of fur- 

n.i- . . Fig, i .-it ion, and Figi 2 i 

plan, hi the accompanying drawing 

Hi tint cylinders encircled by bearing- 

which reel on friction rolls, <_', which 

tably jonrnaled in boxes, '■. thai 

"ii s bed, /'. Said cylinders, or furnaces, .-1 

Ji, are set at an inclination of an inch to the 

. 
volved bj means of worm and wheels, A', or 
The two furwv I ■■ . 
nt different elevations, the fui d 
baring its higher and receiving end ■■ 
in a flue, /', that it i with the 

smoke-stack, O, while its lower end r. 
the fire-box, //. 

ading laterally from the fire-box, //, is a 
Sue, /, that extends paralle] with the flue, /', 
for u short distance, and then turns at right 

angles : I I " ! - ■ Q. The 

I the furnace or cj liu- 

evolveain the flue, /, on a lower plane 

than is the flrfl'box, H t and the lower cud of s.*iitl 

supported in a fire box, A . on 

i riotiqjt-rolls, or oth< 

When the device is in operation the ore to be 
operated upon is fed into the higher end of the 
tunia._-._- A through a hopper, [indicated at c,) 
and passing through the furnace A, is exposed 
to a gradually- increasing temperature as it ap- 
niviiiA II, whereby the ore is 
wholly or partly desulphurized, the sulphurous 
fumes passing off at the some time through the 
tluc I' directly into the smokestack (J. From 
the lower end of thefnrnace A the desulphurized 
ore falls through an inclined passage or chute, 
i/, in the flue / into the higher end of the fur- 
nace I '■, and as the desulphurized ore passes 
through said passage or chute t/ t common salt 
i introduced through the hopper,/ to mix with 
the ore and fall with it into the furnace B. 
The mingled ore and salt then gradually descend 
through the furnace B, exposed to a gradually- 
increasing temperature aathey approach the fire- 
box K, whereby the metallic portions of the ore 
are chloridized, until the ore finally falls into a 
receptacle, (indicated at//,) whence it maybe 
removed for lixiviation or amalgamation. In 
this operation, the ore being wholly or partially 
desulphurized or oxidized before the application 
of the salt, the metallic portions of the ore and 
the chlorine of the salt more readily and 
thoroughly combine, thereby effecting a saving 
id salt and of the metals over the ordinary 
methods; and the passage of the ore from one 
furnace into the other being continuous the ore 
docs not become cooled in the operation. 
Jt is well known, of course, that it is 
not new to first roast the ores by themselves and 
afterward with common salt. In this the two 
furnaces are combined and connected by a 
chute, and the salt is introduced into the ore in 
the passageof the latter from one furnace to the 
other. 

One of these furnaces is running at the Ne- 
vajo-lndependence mill, Tuscarora, Nev. It 
gives very good satisfaction. The superintend 
ent says that the improvements made in the 
manner of desulphurizing and chloridizing havt 
added four per cent to the working results 
and a saving of 25 per cent in salt. The work- 
ings have averaged 94 per cent since this fur- 
nace was put in use, The shipments of bullion 
from the mill have been steady, showing re- 
sults of the most satisfactory kind. They have 
shipped, since they begun working with this 
furnace, some $700,000; capacity of mill, 10 
stamps. 

The principle on which the Nev in patent 
dre-roasting and chloridizing furnace does the 
work so eiTectually and quickly is based on the 
old and approved method of oxidizing or desul- 
phurizing before chloridizing. 

There are two Hues, a construction which 
admits of driving oil the fumes while the 
ore is being desulphurized, but the chlorine of 
the salt is retained in the chloridizing furnace. 
Robert A. Nevin, patentee; box 2361, .San Fran 
cisco, Gal., will issue licenses for use or sale; 
or will construct furnaces. 



Mining Patents. 

ad Office 
a short time since rejected the application f"i 
patent of a California gravel mine, be* 
publication of the notice t! 

ball of a certain sec- 
tion when it WAS really the smith half. The 

initials S and K wen mar} in 

Buch notice*. The owners of the tract applied 
to the Secretary of the Interior, who rules 

that patents cannot | 

land applied for in specifically described in the 
publication, or with Buch certainty thai 
in intern I misled thereby. Publica- 

tion as t i of the tract in question was 

not publication as to the S. ^ and persons fa- 
re not n uuired to take 
notice thereof, it is immaterial that, as 
claimed by appellants, this was a typo- 
graphical error merely, because it was 
not, legally or in fact, publication of 
4 the ten acres of laud applied for. 
The Secretary does not say, then-ion-, that 



Working in Bad Air in Mines. 

We have Beveta) times referred to tb 
atus for working in bad air underground, which 
is being introduced in the various England col- 
li here it is kept foi 
dent It is called til. Pli i ! i ' ■ ft is 
self-SUStained and wholly independent of the 
surrounding atmosphere, and will 
breathable air for four hours at a tin. 
enabling the wearer to breathe with *■■■ 
the most deadly gases. The principle of the 
apparatus is, that the wearer breathes b 
breath over and over again, the carbonic acid 
being taken from it at each respiration uid the 
requisite amount of oxygen restored, the re- 
vivified breath is tit to be again inhaled in the 
form of pure air. The apparatus, which is car- 
ried upon the back of the explorer, in the form 
of a knapsack, consists ol o I ooppei 

■ . tinder, twelve inches by six and one-balf 
inches, with domed ends, and capable of hold- 
ing four cubic feet of oxygen gas, at a pre* on 
of sixteen atmospheres. U)ove tin cylinder 




Fig. 1. NEVIN'S ORE 
the Commissioner's decision is erroneous, but 
he modifies that decision, and directs that if 
appellants shall so elect, they may, within sixty 
days, under direction of the Register, publish a 
supplemental notice of their application for 
patent for said S. \, with the same rights there 
under, and the same rights to other parties, as 
iE it were an original publication, provided the 
tract shall not then he otherwise appropriated, 
oi- valid adverse rights shall not have attached 



CHLORIDIZING FURNACE, 
and attached to the side of it is a square metal 
box, twelve by twelve by four inches, to con- 
tain the filter, which is a box of vulcanite di- 
vided into four compartments by vertical dia- 
phragms, and with a wooden lid, made air- 
tight by an india-rubber washer, and having an 
inlet and outlet pipe with valves attached. 
This box is filled with hempen tow and stick 
caustic soda; the exhaled breath passes twice 
up and down through the tow and soda, and 
is thoroughly freed of carbonic acid, the ex- 







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« 


/: 


a 
















| 




T -f 












M 

















Fig. 2- PLAN OF ROASTING AND CHLORIDIZING FURNACE. 



Two hydraulic miners, (I. F. Jacobs and 
Michael "O'Brien, coming into Nevada City from 
the Sargent & Jacobs' hydraulic claims, at 
(Quaker dbf ill, were "stood up" by two masked 
highwaymen. The robbers took an iron pail 
containing §1, "200 worth of wet amalgam, 
cleaned up that day from the head flumes of 
the .Scott's flat set of diggings. 



thereto; and if audi right shall not have at- 
tached, the Commissioner is instructed to with- 
hold the tract from other disposition pending 
the time allowed appellants for selection. 



Reduction Works. 

The Mardoch reduction works, which are to 
be put in operation at Ogden this season by a 
company of Eastern capitalists, propose to com- 
bine with facilities for reducing the various 
kinds of ore, sampling works and the purchase 
of ores on a large scale. We hear of sam - 
pling works being contemplated at several 
other points where ore purchasers and 
miners will be accommodated, hut sampling 
works and ore purchasers at Ogden will benefit 
only the few miners in this camp who have a 
sufficiently high grade* of ore to warrant the ex- 
pense of transportation to that point. Could 
the ore market be brought to our door by the 
establishment of the works here, not only 
would thousands of men be employed in the 
works and in extracting ores from lower grade 
mines, but the capital employed would he kept 
at home and the projectors of the enterprise 
could buy their ores at prices so reasonable as 
to insure a large return on the capital invested. 
—Butte Miner. 



cess of moisture collecting under a perforated 
false bottom arranged for that purpose. A flat 
bag of vulcanized india-rubber, 15 by 12 inches, 
is fastened in front of the wearer, and is con- 
nected by an india-rubber pipe passing over 
the shoulder to the outlet pipe of the filter: the 
bag is also in communication with the oxygen 
chamber, and the supply of oxygen can be 
regulated by i\ jamb screw valve under the 
control of the wearer. An india-rubber mask 
is made to fit airtight to the face and is held in 
place by straps buckled up at the back of the 
head. The mask is fitted with a pair of flexible 
pipes, the one for exaling being in communi- 
cation with the inlet pipe of the filter, and the 
other for inhaling being in communication with 
the air bag. The exhaled breath having passed 
through the filter, enters the bag in a purified 
state, and there meeting with its complement 
of oxygen, is lit to be again inhaled. The 
bag, being perfectly flexible, readily expands 
or contracts as the breath passes in or out of it, 
so that no effort is required in respiration. 
Foster and Fleuss' safety mining lamp is a mod- 
ification of the lime light, methylated spirits of 
wine being used instead of hydrogen gas, and 
consists of a strong copper sphere, seven inches 
in diameter, and capable of being charged with 
oxygen at a pressure of from sixteen to twenty 
atmospheres. To the top of the sphere is at- 
tached a small spirit lamp with two wicks, be- 
tween which, through a small jet, a minute 
stream of oxygen, regulated by an adjusting 



valve on the sphere, ipass, carrying 

the flame against a cylinder of lime held 

■ 
in and rendered perfectly sale from mil;.. 
ble dome-ahaped metal . 
having an annular space left between its inner 

i ia filled with 
■ ' ts ins- 

each other in the inner and outer casings and a 

amall outlet valve is fixed in the inner case 

near it* lower part For the escape ol the | I 

nets of combustion from the inside ol the 
casing into the annular apace filled with water 
. through which th< 

her nutlet valve 

■ i he top "i the out» r cast XI 

is attached to the lower part by means of a 
Bcrew, an airtight joint beini ",.,:, i.. , 
washer seating. The lamp will burn for four hours 
under water, in carbonic acid or in lire. lamp, 
and it cannot get hotter than boiling water. 

iii ii ol Hi.., inveni ioss lb, that all 

means of communication with the Burfi 
pure atmosphere i-> now dispensed with, and the 
wearer ol rlenas' dress bjb enabled to carry with 

him, not merely compn n d air, bul om 

pactly, and therefore lasting fora longer period, 
the ingredients for producing and reproducing 
breathable air. The lamp also is isolated and 
■ Ji ontnicsd, giving li : ;ht that is inaccessible 
to the gases or water bj which it may be bui*- 
rounded with' ait imparting or sustaining injury, 
and without any connection with tubing or 
elect tic h ii ea, 

Enlarged Issues of the Mining and Sci- 
entific Press. 

It is the intention of the publishers of this 
journal to spar-- no enterprise in advancing the 

future interests of its readers by all reasonable 
and practicable methods. Among other ad- 
vances, we contemplate issuii eral ex- 
tra sized sheets, especially devoted to different 

important localities, The next will be OH 
Utah Territory, July2'st. 

Utah has won for herself a bright nam- IV 

her many dividend paying properties, and each 
year her mineral resource! are being more and 
more developed, Xhi mines s re scattered <>\ er 
a wide region and are hi great number. The 
record of bullion shipments is highly encourag- 
ing in the interests of legitimate mining. A 
general description of the mining regions with 
such maps as will aid in illustrating the loca- 
tions of the districts, will be given in this edi- 
tion. 

Other double editions will follow shortly 
after, which will be devoted to the special in- 
terests of other mining localities. 

All these regions possess more or less interest 
for California and San Francisco. We ship 
goods of certain kinds from here, and, from a 
commercial point of view alone, our interests 
are mutual. Moreover, the advancement of 
these regions does good to the whole coast, in 
which we are all interested. 

Persons who can contribute information of 
special or general interest to our readers for 
these various issues are solicited to send the 
same as early as possible. If miners will send 
us descriptions of their mines or camps we shall 
be very glad to receive them. 

As we make this extra effort to advance the 
interests of all concerned in the places named, 
we ask that all who can, to favor our enterprise 
by making the matters more widely known, 
and the Mixing, and Scientific Press more 
extensively patronized. The mining literature 
of the world is comparatively limited. Miners 
and scientific men especially should be liberal to 
assist their helpers in a line of publication, 
which, at best, cannot be expected to be largely 
profitable while doing strict justice to the high- 
est interests it represents. 

The dates of issue of the proposed extra 
sheets maybe varied, f ciicumstauces should 
demand it, but due notice will be given. 



Mental (liiprcaslon, weakness of the muscular system, 
general ill-Health, benefited by uhuik Brown's Iron 
Bitters. 



Our Agents. 

Oun Prikndb can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and scienee, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend fco send nonu 
but worthy men. 

G. W. McGrbw — Santa Olara county. 

M. P. Owes— Santa Cruz county. 

J. W. A. Wright— Merced, Tulare and Kern counties 

Jarku C. Hoaq— California. 

B. W. CitowKLL — Arizona Territory 

M. ii- Joseph — Eureka, Nev. 

I. M. LKliiY — Los Angeles, San Bernardino and San 
Diego counties. 

A. C. Knox— Oregon and Washington Ter. 

J. J. Bartell — Volo county. 



10 



Mining and ' Scientific Press. 



[July 7, 1883 



IWetalllirgy apdjte 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

No. 23 STEVENSON STREET. 

Near First and Market StreetB, S. F. 

E8TAJBWSHBD, 1869. 0. A. Loorhardt, Manager. 

Ores Worked by any Process. 
Ores Sampled. 
Assaying in all its Branches. 
Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Waters, Etc 
Working Tests (Practical) Made. 
Plans and Specifications furnished for the 
most suitable process for working Ores. 

Special attention paid to Examinations of 
Minos, plans and reports furnished. 

C. A. LUCKHABDT & CO, 
(Formerly Hulin & Luckhardt) 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgists 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO,. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DBALKR8 Of 

Assayers' Materials, 

MINE and MILL SUPPLIES, 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS AND CHEMICALS, DRUG- 
GISTS' GLASSWARE AND SUNDRIES, Etc 

118 and 120 Market Street, and 15 and 17 
California St., San Francisco. 

We would call the attention of Assayers, Chemists, 
Mining Companies, Milling Companies, Prospectors, etc., 
to our full stock of Balances, Furnaces, Muffles, Cruci- 
bles, Scorifiers, etc., including, also, a full stock of 
Chemicals. 

Having been engaged in furnishing these supplies since 
tho first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast, we feel 
confident from our experience we can well suit, the de- 
mand for these foods both as to quality and price. Our 
JVeut Illustrated Catalogue, with prices, will be sent on 
application. 

£3TOur Gold and Silver Tablos, showing the value per 
ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and valuable 
tables for computation of assays in grams and gramrneB, 
will be sent free upon application. Agents lor the Patent 
Plumbago Crucible Co., London, England. 

JOHN TAYLOR A OO. 



• 



METALLURGICAL WORKS, 

318 Pine St., (Basement), 



Corner of Leldesdorff Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Ores Sampled and Assayed, and Tests Made by any 
Process. 
Assaying and Analysis of Ores, Minerals and Waters. 
Mines examined and reported on. 
Piactical Instruction given in Treating Ores by ap- 
proved processes. 

G. KTJSTEL & CO., 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgist 

OTTOKAR HOFMANN, 

Metallurgist and Mining Engineer. 

Erection of Leaching and Cblorination Works a 
specialty. Address, 

Cor. Fifth and Bryant Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



WM. D JOHNSTON, 
ASSAYER AND ANALYTICAL CHEMIST, 

113 Leldesdorff Street, 

Bet. California and Sicrameivo Sti, SAN FRANCISCO 

ASSAYING TAUGHT. 

/^Personal attention insureB Correct Returns. TEJ 



THOS. PRICE'S 



Assay Office and Chemical 
Laboratory, 

624 Sacramento St.. S. F. 



EDWARD BOOTH, 

Chemist and Assayer, 

No. 110 Sutter St., S. F. 



KCHSt : J.S.PHILLIPS = 



rEXAMi.NtB, ASSAYER, AND METALLURGIST 

|43 Years' Practice'. Pacific Coast 141 1 

Smifor list o/ ftis Mining Books. Tools. &c. 

Instruction on Assaying and Testing. 

ADVICE UN MINING AND METALLURGY. 

■ Assaying Apparatus selected and supplied. 
J,j;encyforatSwanseaCo. Paying mixed ores. | 



ASSAYS-FCR PROSPECTORS S2.PER METAL, 



Cheap Ore Pulverizer. 

There is for sale in this city, by I. A- Heald, American 
Machine and Model Works, 111 and 113 First St , a 
Rutherford Pulverizer, an improved revolving barrel 
crusher, which was only used a f ew times and is as good 
as -new. H will be sod very much below cost, and 
miners who are in need of buch an appliance for a small 
mine will do well to make inquiries concerning it. It is 
suitable for a pulverizing mill for powder or other sub- 
nances. Referenco as to above can be had upon applying 

, thia office. 



INGERSOLL ROCK DRILLS 




Mining Machinery. 

For Catalogues, Estimates, Etc., address 

Berry & Place Machine Company, 

PARKE & LACY, Proprietors.] 

8 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Established 1864. 



THE MOREY & SPERRY MINING MACHINERY CO.. 



WAREROOM8 : 
»3 & 9-4 Liberty St., New York. 



The Foii'idry and Machine SStiop hfa.?ug •■■ en 
make from the most improved patterns (.H^ARTZ a 
wo ruing GOLD and SILVER ores 




l5JCC6L3ors to MOREY & SPlSRRYj 

Manufacturers of all kinds of- 



Mine and Mill Machinery 



WORKS t 

Newbnrg, - New York, 

e'ifcrged we are row prcpjuecl 
ajd STABiP MILLS e-ompkae, U 



MOREY'S IMPROVED PULVERIZER. 



Mm IMPROVED PULVERISER, 

For WET or DRY Crushing. 
SIMPLE, EFFICIENT and DURABLE. 

The RalU revolve Hi>rl/.onialIr without riction. 
5 ft. size, weight 7,000 lL.5.,;iud docs more work than 15 
Stamps, 3 ft. siza, -weigh 3,00u lis. 

Concentntf.ing Mills. Ruck breakers. Amalgamating 
Pan? a nd Separates, Rrasting Furnaces, Hoisting and 
Puuii'iiig Machinery, Engines ;irj Boilers, any size 
required, Hydraulic (Hants and Pipe, Ore Cars, Ore 
Buckets, Safety Cages. The Rflnd Power Two-stamp 
Mill weight 2S0 lis. THE EUREKA WIRE ROPE 

TRAMWAYS, Concentrating Ritlles for Mills and Ry 

dranlic Sluices. 



^tpel SHOES and DIES for Stamps, and Mine and Mill Supplies. Agenta for IMLAY ORE CONCENTRATOR and fcfl 
MINERS' HAND ROCK DRILL. Iniormation and Estimates cheerfully given S end lor « illaloglic. 

Address, THE MOREY &. SPERRY MINING MACHINERY OO. 



ANTI-SCALE COMPOUND 

Manufactured by RICKARD & DURDEN. 

We Kuarantee that, with proper use, t^is Compound will remove end prevent all 

INCRUSTATION IN STEAM BOILERS. 

Ten years trial, in widely separated lo cali'ie?, h .s demonitrattd the value of this invention, and its applicability 
to different qualities of water. References cheerfully furnished to any one wishins same. 

O-TEN POUND SAMPLE BOX FURNISHED FREE ON APPLICATION. "SS 

BERRY & PLACE MACHINE CO., Sole Agents, 

No. 8 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



READY FOR DELIVERY. 

LATHES, DKJLLING MACHINES, PLANING MACHINES 

And Other Machine Tools. 
STRONG, DURABLE AND SUPERIOR TO IMPORTED MACHINES. 

"Wheel Cutting' to Order. 
SABJ PRAJffCISCO TOOL CO., 21 Stevenson St., S. F. 



Jvlipipg tpg«. 



Luther Wagoner, C. E., M. E. 

JonN Hays Hammond, M. E. 

Wagoner & Hammond, 
MINING ENGINEERS, 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, and 

Alamos, Sol or a, Mexico. 

special attention to the desdening and construction of 
Concentration Works for nil ores. Gradual reduction by 
rolling impact, c aesification by air currents, improved 
pointed boxes and corrugated rubber and iron Riitinger 
tables. 

-^"Correspondence and samples solicited from parties 
having low-grade properties. 

MINES REPORTED UPON. 



GEORGE MADEIRA, 

Geologist and Mining Engineer. 



Reports on mines furnished; Estimates of Machinery 
etc. Special attention paid to the examination of mines 
in Mexico, California, Arizona and New Mexico. Thirty 
ytara in the mines of the above States. 

SI HABLA KSPAMU,.l ! 

Address, car* this office or SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 

W. W. BAILEY, 

Mechanical Engineer, 

Room 22, Stock Exchange, S. F. 
Plans and Snec fications iarnished for HoiBting, Pump- 
ing, Mill, Mining and other Machinery. Machinery in- 
spected and erected. 



SCHOOL OF 

Practical, Civil, Mechanical and Min 
ing Engineering, 

SURVEYING, DRAWING AND ASSAYING, 
24 Post Street, San Francisco 

A. VAN DER NAILLEN, Principal. 

Send for Circuit'-. 

W. C. JOHNSON, Engineer, 

Fitcnburg, Mass., 

Engines, Mining and Railroad Macliiiiery ana Supplies 

PURCHASED ON COMMISSION. 

Correspondence Solicited. California and Nevada Ref e r- 
ences. Full advantages of falling prices In Eastern 
markets secured our customers 



F. VON LEICHT, 
Mining; and Civil Engineer. 

Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
£VRenorts. Surveys and Plans of Milieu niarUi. .** 



Redlands. 



The most delightfully situated colony hi 
Southern California, 

Remarkably healthy, being -.2,000 feet above 
the sea level. 

Wholly devoted to fruit culture, and espe- 
cially adapted to oranges and raisins. 

Advantages of church, school, store, depot, 
hotel, stage line, telegraph ami telephone. 

Illustrated Circulars on Application. 

JUDSON&BROWN, 

Redlands, 

PAF BERNARDINO. CALIFORNIA. 



San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works 

J. W. QUICK, Manufaoturbr. 

Several iirat premiums receiv. d 
for Quartz Mill Screens, and Per- 
forated Sheet Metals of every 
description. I would call special 
attention to my SLOT CUT and 
SLOT PUNCHED SCREENS, 
which are attracting much at- 
tention and giving unversaJ 
satisfaction. This is the only 
establishment on the coast de- 
voted exclusively to the manufac- 
ture of Screens. Mill owners using Battery Screens exten 
Blvely can contract for large supplies at favorable rates. 
Orders solicited and promptly attended to. 

32 Fremont Street. San Francisco. 

Dewey & Co. ; iIu f^, ! Patent Agt's r 



WM. 



Juli 7, 1883] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 






oietxo^oo FRASER & CHALMERS. ^™o M 

MANUFACTURERS OF IMPROVED AND APPROVED FORMS OF 



Having made MtflOllro addlMnrm to our Shuf* and Machinery, we ha»e now the LARGEST and BEST AH- 
t'UhNTKD SHOPS in the West. We are prepared to build from the Laical una M.«t Approved Put 



QUARTZ MILLS 



Kor workup K"ld *nd ollver ores by wet or dr> crushing. The SU-u-feldt. Howell's Improved While, Brunton'o & 
i -t, (or working base ores. notary Dryers, Stelefeldl bnprovod Dry Kiln Furnaces. 

SMELTING FURNACES, 

Wak-r Jacketa, either Wrought oi cut ir-'ii, mode in oectiuns or one ptoce, either round, oblODJt, ova) or square. Our 
pattern- >> SPECIAL FURNACES FoK OOPPEB BMELTINO. BQag Pou and Cars, improved 

(•-rni BoIUon ui'd Copper Moulds and Ladles, Litharge Cars und Pols, Cupel Furnaces and Cms. 



Frue Ore Concentrator, or Vanner Mills. 

Coarse Concent rating Works, Improved Ji««. OrOihlng R"||ers, Siren*, Tromi agar Tables, and nil othor 

adjuncts for the proper wor king ..f Gold, BUver troa, oompleu In overj d< 

IIALLID1K IMPROVED OHE TRAMWAYS. We refer lo Gen. Coatoi mini Idaho, 5,000 foot long; 
Oolumblia fcllne, Uol., 4.7&0 feut long; Mary Murphy mine, Col., &,000 feet long, all in oonstftDt operation. 

LEACHING MILLS, 

Improved Corliss and Plain Slide Valve Meyer's Cut-off Engines. 

CORLISS ENGINES from 12*26 CvUndora to 80x00. PLAIN SLIDE VALVI-S lr..u. 6x10 to MxM. BOILERS 
ol ever* form, mwio of Pine Iron Work-* C. H. No. 1 Mange Iron, or Utin blee). Workmanflhfp Ibe moat ireful. AH 
KivuUtHai.d Driven. 



HOISTING ENGINES 



Large or Smell for flat or round rope. Double Cylinder Kneinee. from 6x10 to 18x00. Thie laltor size furnislied J. P. Hntri-'ln for (imnt mil ni.l \i, c. , Black Hilly 
elaoCorllaePuini'ink' Bd I, for HoIaUng and Pumping Worka, for 2.000 feet deep. B«by llol.ta for ProH|MTiin,r, 4 H. p. in <> h. p. 



Wire Rope, Safety Cages and any Size and Forms of Cars. 

Principal Office and Woiks, Fulton and Union Sts., Chicago, Illinois. 



McCaskell's Patent Car Wheels and Axles- Best in Use. 

New York Office, Walter McDermott. Manager, Room 32, No. 2 Wall St. 



CONTINENTAL WORKS, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Due's Mechanical Atomizer or Pulverizer. 

For mincinir to no impalpable powder all kind* of hard and brittle rahBUUMKB, audi as QUARTZ, EMERY, CORUNDUM, GOLD 
AND SILVER ORES, KVKYTES, COAL. OCHKE. MAVuANESE, IRON ORES, 

PHOSPHATE ROCK:, ETC 

It In tdmp'u and rot liable to get. out of order, Revolving Shell being constructed of Siemens-Martin steel, and all parte mechanica 
ia design aadol flm-clan conetruclf in, Weight '< BOO lbs.; heaviest piece, 1,600 lbs. It will pulverize 7 to 10 Tons in 10 Hours 
with 30 H. P. For circulars and luil particulars apply to or address, 

THOS F. ROWLAND. Sole Man'fr. Brooklyn. N. Y. 




SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO.. 

416 Montgomery St.. San Francisco. 

Oold and Silver Refinery 
And Assay Office. 

H1GF1RHT PRICKS PAID KOR 

Gold. Silver anil Load Ores and Sulphurets 

Manufacturers of Bluestone. 

ALSO, LEAD PIPE, SHEET LEAD, SHOT, ETC. 

This Company has the best facilities on the Coast 
for working 

GOLD, SILVER and LEAD 

IN THEIR VARIOUS FORMS. 
PRENTISS SEI.BT. - - Superintendent 

COPP'S U. S. MINERAL LANDS, 

Laws, Forms, 

Has no surplus verbiage. Contains Dr. Raymond's Glos- 
sary. Explains bo w to examine mining titles. Contains 
numerous co tirt decisions. Gives the Public Land Com- 
missions GodiBca' Ion, and gives many an d improved forms 

Price -Full lnw btndfngr, extra paper, $0.00. 
For Sale by DEWEY & CO., San Francisco 

San Francisco Cordage Factory. 

Established 1856. 
Constantly on hand a full assortment of Manila Rope, 
Sisa Rope. - Tarred Manila Rope, Hay Rope, Whali 
Line, etc., etc. 
Extra sizes and lengths made to order on short notice 
TUBBS & CO.. 
611 and 618 Frout Street. San Franc.sa 

Patent Life -Saving Respirator. 

PREVENTS 1. sad POISONrHO anhhA1.iv 

I oval liable to thone 
engaged iu dry crueh- 
ug quartz roiila. qulok- 
nilver mines, white lead 
corroding, feeding 
thrashing machines 
<tud all occupations 
where the surronndiDg 
atmosphere in tilled 
with dust, obnoxious 
smells or poison m 
vapors. The Respira- 
tors are sold subject 
to approval after trial, 
and, if not satisfactory, 
the price wi'l be re- 
funded. Price, 33 
each, or $30 per dozen 

Address all cornnnuii 
cations and orders 
to 

H. H. BROMLEY, Sole Agent, 

43 Sacramento Street. San Francisco, Cal. 




FOR SALE 

By J. M. LAKBNAN, of Grass Valley Foun- 
dry, Grass Valley, Cal. 

One 20-inch bore engine, 24-inch stroke; one 18-inch 
bore engine, 40-inCh stroke, .Meyer's cut-off; one rl-ineh 
bore engine, 86-inch stroke, Meyer's cut-off; two 12-inch 
bore enginesj 30-inch stroke ; two setsheavy pumping gear, 
with bob and connecting rod irons, etc.; 450 [eetof 16 inch 
pump pipe ol |-ineh iron, heav\ flanges; besides other 
mining and milling machinery. 

For information, address 

J. M. LAKENAN, 

Grass Valley, Cal. 



WM SARTLQIG. 



[ 



BHNRY KIMBALL 

BARTLING- & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS. 

Paper Balers & Blank Booi Manufacturers 
606 Clay Street,(southweat corner Sansome), 

SAM FHANCI800. 



IF 1 . Q-. BECKETT, 

Manufacturer of 

VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

FROM 2 TO 90 - HORSE POWER. 

Improved Hova'l'ig Engiuee. Kugines for oteam Yaobt&. Engi-ies for pump'rig arteslj'.i walls aad irrigating and 
f.u-ml jg purpoaea, and all kinds of Machinery. 

Repairing Promptly Attended to. 
No 44 FIRST STREET. SAN" FRANCISCO. flAL. 




ATLAS"""" 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S. 

MANOFACTUKEItS OP 



WORKS 

D..U.S 

s OP 

STEAM ENGINES 
and BOILERS. 

Carry Engines and Boilers in Stock for Immediate Delivery. 
H. P. GREGORY & CO., Agents, San Francisco, Cal. 




N. W. SPAULDING'S 




O 






^^ PAT" SEPT.. 10™ IXEI ^ 



PATENT DETACHABLE TOOTH SAWS, 

Manufactory. 17 A 10 Fremont St.. S. P. 



H. H. BROMLEY, 

Dealer in Leonard & EIHb Celebra'od 

TRADE MARK, 



wpE 

STEAM CYLINDER AND MACHINE OILS, 
The Be-^fc and Cheapest. 

These Superior OilB caniivt be purcbaseil through dealer 
and are sold direct to i-misamn- unty by H. H. BROMLEY, 
sole Scaler in rhese Kor di 

Rference Any first-clasR Engine or Machine Build T in 
America. Addiess, 43 S arrauioiito SI,. S. t'. 



THE BEST IN USE! 



iMPROmBUCKET 



This Is the only Scientifically Constructed Bucket in 
the market. It "is itru k uut from charcoal etampiDp- 
iron. No corners to c>tuh. No seams to buret. No 
interior corners to clog up. It runs with great 2ase, and 
half the power of the old *tvle bucket. WILL OUT- 
WEAR HALF A DOZEN' OF THEM. 

PRICES REDUCED. 

T. F. ROWLAND, Sole Mfr. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

II. P. GREGORY & CO., Agents, San Francisco, Cal., 
carry a stock of all sizes. 



PACIFIC POWER CO. 

Room with steam power to lot in the 
Pacific Power Co.'s new brick building, 
Stevenson street, near Market. Eleva- 
tor in buildiDg. Apply at the Com- 
pany's office, 314 California stroet. 



" 3DTT3SrCA.3Sr " 

ROCK DRILL! 

FOR MINES, Q0AEE1E3, ETC. 

J. CTJYAS, Agent, 

10 Park Place, - - New York. 

RICHARD C. REMMEY, Agent, 




BttTriUi Stwut* nitriiR jiuSu r 



■■/ §,r.*- .— por- 

Uanufat'furlng 

acidJI Clicuiisf-. 

POT I AlHotrheiiiicalBi-ii'ks 
— Jl for Glover Tower, 



12 



Mining and 'Scientific Press. 



[July 7, 1883 



Patents y\ND Inventions, 



List of U. S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

From the official list of U. S. Patents in Dewey & Co.'s 
Scientific Press Patent Agency, 252 Market St., S. F. 

]-'ok Week Ending June 26, 1883. 
280,013. — Folding Box— P. Canessa, S. F. 
2*0,135. — or a it Equalizer — E. H. Cooper, 
Winters, Cal. 
280,161.— Vegetable Slicer — F. Espel, S. F. 
280,026.— Si'OON Boring Bit— Benj. -Forstner, 

Salem, Or. 

280,027.— Rotary Engine— C. C. Garcelon and 
W. A. Woods, Santa Cruz, Cal. 

280,315. — Hydraulic Jack — T. O. Hutchinson, 
Salem, Or. 

280,319. — Buckle — McQoskey& Coleman, Walla. 
Walla, W. T. 

280,057. — Picture Bracket — Charles Megow, 
S. F. 

280,234.— Bottle- Filling Machine— William 
Pearson, Carson, Nev. 

280,106. — Force Pump — M. L. G. Wheeler, Ore- 
gon 1 iity, Or. 

Note.— Copies of U. S. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by tele- 
graph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent busi- 
ness for Pacific coast Inventors transacted with perfect 
security and in the shortest possible time. 



Notices of Recent Patents. 

Among the patents recently obtained through 
Dewey & Co.'s Scientific Press American and 
Foreign Patent Agency, the following are 
worthy of special mention: 

Saw Swage. — Simon Kinney, of Port Town- 
send, W. T. No. 279,769. Dated June 19, 
1883. This invention relates to a new and use- 
ful improvement in the class of saw swaging 
machines, and more especially in that certain 
machine previously patented l>y the same in- 
ventor. The improvement consists in a novel 
swaging die or block of peculiar but simple con- 
struction. It is of such a shape that it is prac- 
ticable to make it of a single piece of steel. One 
side of it acts as a back or guide to steady the 
side which is serving as a die, and it cannot 
rock or roll. It is strong, and has nothing to 
work loose. Its single guide arm is sufficient, 
as the pressure is all on the back; and it may 
be for this reason made less cumbersome than 
the old form. 



New Smelters. 



Operations at the smelters continue at a lively 
rate. One hundred men are now employed in 
constructing the new plants and running the 
old ones. Among important buildings recently 
completed is a large brick stack about fifty feet 
high and SxS at the bottom, which serves as a 
final outlet for the fumes, which are freed from 
lead by passage through a lengthy horizontal 
flue after leaving the furnaces. 

One of the forty-ton furnaces was blown in on 
Weduesday evening, and the remaining one, 
which is now under preparation, will be ready 
by the 20th instant. 

Ore hauling to the smelters continues at the 
rate of 50 tons daily. Seven large teams are 
making regular trips from the West Fork and 
Irwin mines, while two are hauling from the 
Elkhorn, two from the Star, one from Star 
Mountain, and several from East Fork, besides 
those engaged in hauling fluxes. 

The "21 charcoal kihis are kept in operation 
by the wood from Warm Spring creek, which is 
floated down in large quantities in the V Hume. 
It is estimated that 5,000 cords are ready for 
the flume. Everything looks lively at the 
works, and the new building improvements 
necessary for the managers and men, being 
nearly completed, add much to the general ap- 
pearance of the place. —Ketchum (Idaho) Key- 
stone. 

A Prospector's Luck.— Sam. Schepp, a pros- 
pector, a short time since, went to an old citi- 
zen of Graniteville, this county, and asked for 
a pointer as to where he could go to work and 
make grub money. He was directed to the 
eroppuigs of a ledge that crosses the wagon 
road between Gvaniteville and Morse's mill, and 
advised to try his luck there. He sunk down, 
took out 30 tons of ore and had it crushed, and 
realized SfiOO. The quartz gets better as it goes 
down, and now the locator proposes to open his 
claim systematically. For 17 years Schepp had 
been picking around the county, but he man- 
aged to hit the wrong place every time till now. 
For a great many years a string of wagons have 
been traveling over the eroppings of this rich 
ledge, and many a prospector has taken a look 
at it only to conelude that lie could expend his 
labor somewhere else to better advantage. 
That's the way the wheel of fortune whizzes 
around in a mining county. You can't tell 
when it is going to stop at the right notch.— 
A i rmla Transcript. 



The excess in the value of exports over im- 
ports for the twelve months ending May 31, 
1§88, is $99,334,649; total value of imports and 
merchandise for twelve months ending May 31, 
1883, $731,068,482. 

"ONtt 01' OUR MOST INTEHKSTlHfi EXCHANGES," is the 

way the Sontfwm Planter, of Richmond, Va,, speaksof 
ilia Rural Press, 



Placers and Lode. 

A very important decision has been rendered 
by a federal court in the case of the Iron Silver 
Mining Co. against Sullivan and the Champion 
Mining Company. The decision was based 
upon a number of new questions of law which 
have never before entered into any mining suit, 
and the result is that millions of dollars worth 
of mining property will be affected by it. It 
decides four different suits, three of which are 
against the Champion Company. They are all 
for ejectment. It is claimed that the defend- 
ants located lodes within the property patented 
as placer mines by the Iron Silver Mining 
Company. In their respective answers they 
held in general terms only that the 
lodes were " known " lodes and failed to 
show whether or not they had ever taken 
any silver from the lodes or had filed any 
claim previous to the location of the placer 
claims. A general demurrer was entered to 
their answers and the demurrer was sustained 
yesterday. The decision holds that the term 
" known lode " within a placer claim does not 
make the owner's title good unless he can show 
that he had filed a claim for the lode, which 
ante-dates the claim for the placer property. 

Judge McCrary expressed a wish that the 
decision in this case, which affects numerous 
others, might be submitted at an early day to 
the consideration of the Supi-eme Court of the 
United States. He said he had found much 
difficulty in the construction of sections 2,320 
and 2,333 of the Revised Statutes of the United 
States, the meaning of which is involved in 
these cases. 



A New District. 



The Rochester mining district, situated in 
Madison county, Montana, is just now attract- 
ing considerable attention, and the indications 
point to renewed activity in that section, dur- 
ing the present season. Not a few of the pros- 
pects there have been opened up very success- 
fully, and the ore, in the majority of cases, is 
of excellent grade and exceptional milling qual- 
ity. The veins crop distinctly and are parallel 
and continuous. The district has already pro- 
duced several hundred thousand dollars in gold, 
but as no one had the enterprise or money to 
erect a custom mill of adequate capacity, to 
enable a number of mines to be worked at the 
same time, mining operations, until quite re- 
cently, have never been prosecuted in the dis- 
trict with much energy. Now, however, an 
awakening interest is felt in Rochester mines, 
and the fact that the ledges there are 
in the main gold-bearing, and the ore 
therefore of a character easy to re- 
alize upon, is quite certain to result in the 
inauguration of a number of important mining 
and milling enterprises. The latest evidence of 
this statement is the sale last week of a fourth 
interest in each of the three properties known 
as the Magna Charta, Garfield and True Fissure 
for the sum of $10,000 to Eastern parties repre- 
sented by John Zurcher and Edward Wright, 
two solid and well known mining men. These 
interests were owned by Mr. M. < t. Fitzgibbons, 
a practical and experienced miner, who is also 
interested in the Santa Maria and Colusa, which 
are rich and promising claims. Messrs. Larabie 
and Mellich, of Butte, are also extensively in- 
terested in Rochester, and the former, who is a 
capable mining engineer, speaks very highly of 
the prospects of the camp. Mr. Van Dusen, of 
Butte, also bought into a Rochester prospect a 
few days ago, and will leave to-night for the 
purpose of exploring his purchase. Before the 
end of next summer Rochester will rank among 
the best gold camps on the coast. — Inter-Mown - 
tain. 

COMPILMENTARY SAMPLES OK THIS PAPER are 

occasionally sent to parties connected with the 
interests specially represented in its columns. 
Persons so receiving copies are requested to 
examine its contents, terms of subscription, and 
give it their own patronage, and, as far as 
practicable, aid in circulating the journal, and 
making its value more widely known to others, 
and extending its influence in the cause it faith- 
fully serves. Subscription rate, §4 a year, in 
advance. Extra copies mailed for 10 cents, if 
ordered soon enough. Personal attention will 
be called to this (as well as other notices, at 
times,) by turning a leaf. 



Successful Fatent Solicitors. 

Aa Dewey & Co. have been hi the patent soliciting bus'. 
tiess on this coast now for so many years, the firm' name 
Is a well-known one. Another reason for its popularity ie 
that a great proportion of the Pacific coast. patents iasuul 
by the Government have beon procured through their 
agency. They are, therefore, well and thoroughly posted 
611 the needs of tho progressive ii?dustrial claBoes of thiB 
coast. They are the best posted firm on what has been 
done <n all branches of industry, and are able to judge of 
what is new and patentable. Iu this they have a great 
advantage, which ia of practical dollar and cent value (0 
their clients. That isthis understood a:id appreciated is 
evidenced by (ho number of patents issued uirou^h 'heir 
SoiKNiipic Prkss Patent Agency (S. F.J from weak tr 
weak ami year to year 



Important additions are being continually made in 
Woodward's Gardens. The grotto walled with aquaria is 
constantly receivi ig accessions of new lish and other marine 
life. The number of sea lions is increased, and there is a 
better chance to studv their actions The pavilion has new 
varieiies of performances The Moral department is replete, 
and the wild animals in good vigor. A day at Woodward's 
Gardens is a day well spent. 



News in Brief. 

The Chicago banks are following the lead of 
the New York ones, and are using every means 
possible to throw the trade dollar out of circu- 
lation. 

The strike of the Chinese laborers on the 
Oregon extension still continues, and the 
Mongolians are provided with three weeko 1 
rations. 

Advices indicate a general outbreak of small- 
pox among Arizona Indians, aud Commissioner 
Price has ordered a supply of vaccine virus sent 
to the threatened points. 

It is sagaciously noted that to determine the 
value of building stone a ramble among the 
tombs is wise. In far fewer years than most 
imagine monuments are in decay. 

The idea of a prominent European Sanitary 
Board for protection against epidemics and other 
diseases, is mooted by the press of Vienna. It 
is thought that the Austrian Government will 
officially propose the'formation of such a Board. 

A cave in or filling up of the great diamond 
mine of Kimberly, in Cape Colony, has caused 
much distress. The disaster has affected other 
mines, and ten leading diamond merchants have 
committed suicide on account of their financial 
troubles. 

Mackerel and sardines are being caught 
just now in large quantities off the wharf. 
If sardines or anchovies are so plentiful and 
olive oil so abundant here, why cannot the 
sardine packing business be successfully in- 
augurated here? — Santa Barbara Press. 

The action of the United States authorities 
and the general expression of the public opin- 
ion of America in relation to the influx of 
paupers from Ireland, have plunged some of the 
Irish Poor Law Guardians into the deepest 
alarm and perplexity, and have called forth in 
England a good deal of sharp criticism. 

The cholera has almost closed Port Said to 
commerce. The loss and delay consequent 
upon a lengthy quarantine keep vessels from 
taking coal and water there. The French fleet 
is preparing to leave, and transfers of merchan- 
dise are refused unless they have been subject 
to quarantine. 

The production of rails of various descrip- 
tions in the United States last year was as fol- 
lows: Bessemer steel, 1 ,438,155 tons; iron, 
227,874 tons; open hearth steel, 22,765 tons; 
total, 1,688,794 tons. The corresponding pro- 
duction in 18S2 was as follows: Bessemer 
steel, 1,330,302 tons; iron, 488,581 tons; open 
hearth steel, 25 217 tons; total, 1,844,100. 



The Philadelphia Smelting Works at 
Ketchum, Idaho, cover several acres of ground. 
One hundred tons of ore are delivered daily, all 
of which is paid for at an average of at least $50 
per ton. This gives employment not only to the 
miners who extract the ore, but to all the business 
men and citizens of the place, in one form or 
other, either directly or indirectly. It is said 
that fifty teams are employed in hauling ore, 
lime, coke, iron ore and other supplies to these 
smelting works. While other localities are 
holding their mines for sale and refuse to take 
out the ores, under a pretense that they cannot 
sell or ship them on a paying basis, fifty mines 
. re being worked in this section, and they are 
selling the ores to the Philadelphia company at 
remunerative prices. 



Constipation, liver and kidnej diseases are cured by 
Brown's Iron . Bitters, which enriches the hlood, and 
strengthens the whole system. 



B. SALAZAR, 

Mining Engineer and Meiallurgist, 



Graduate of Freiberg and Olausthal Royal Mill 
Schools, Germany. 



W 



ILL FURNISH ACCURATE REPORTS ON Ml 
in the United States and Mexico. Also, act as 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 



To Companies on all METALLURGICAL and MINING 
MATTERS. 

Starting up Tunnels, Smelting- or Leaching 
Works a Specialty. 

Several years' Practical Experience in Arizona and Mex- 
eo. Would take charge of a mine or reduction works. 

TEMPORARY OFFICE with Kustel & Co., .'US Pine St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June SO, 18S3, the Board of 
Directors of the GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY has declared a dividend On Term Deposits at the 

,te of four and thirty -two onc-hundredths (4 32-100) per 
cent per annum, and on ordinary Deposits at the rate of 
throe and six-tenths (3 fi-10) per cent per annum, free from 
Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 2d day of 
July, 1883. By order, 

GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 California Street, Corner Webb. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1S88, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four and thirty-two onc- 
hiindredtlis (4 32-100) per rent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and three and sixty one-hundredths (:i 60-100) per 
cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxis, paj 
able on and after. THURSDAY, 12th July, 1883. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier, 



PLAIN 
TRUTHS 



The blood is the foundation of 
fife, it circulates through every part 
of the body, and unless it is pure 
and rich, good health is impossible. 
If disease has entered the system 
the only sure and quick way to drive 
it out is to purify and enrich the 
blood. 

These simple facts are well 
known, and the highest medical 
authorities agree that nothing but 
iron will restore the blood to its 
natural condition ; and also that 
all the iron preparations hitherto 
made blacken the teeth, cause head- 
ache, and are otherwise injurious. 

Brown's Iron Bitters will thor- 
oughly and quickly assimilate with 
the blood, purifying and strengthen- 
ing it, and thus drive disease from 
any part of the system, and it will 
not blacken the teeth, cause %ead- 
ache or constipation, and is posi- 
tively not injurious. 

Saved Ms Child. 

17 N. Eutaw St., Baltimore, Md. 
Feb. 12, 1880. 

Gents: — Upon the recommenda- 
tion of a friend I tried Brown's 
Iron Bitteks as a tonic and re- 
storative for my daughter, whom 
I was thoroughly convinced was 
wasting away with Consumption. 
Having lost three daughters by the 
terrible disease, under the care of 
eminent physicians, I was loth to 
believe that anything could arrest 
the progress of the disease, but, to 
my great surprise, before my daugh- 
ter had taken onebottlc of Brown's 
Iron Bitters, she began to mend 
and now is quite restored to former 
health. A fifth daughter began to 
show signs of Consumption, and 
when the physician was consulted 
he quickly said "Tonics were re- 
quired;" and when informed that 
the elder sister was taking Brown's 
Iron Bitters, responded "that is 
a good tonic, take it." 

Adouam Phelps. 



Brown's Iron Bitters effectual- 
ly cures Dyspepsia, Indigestion and 
Weakness, and renders the greatest 
relief and benefit to persons suffering 
from such wasting diseases as Con- 
sumption, Kidney Complaints, etc. 



UNITED STATES 

Submarine Monitor 

c o 3vc :p A.3sr^r 3 

230 Montgomery Street, Room 20, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

WM. H. MILLIKEN, Engineer, 

Q8T Plans are on exhibition and stock ready for issue.. 
Any information that is desired can be furnished at th 
office as above. 




Is the Best Pump In the world. Another 

New Improvement is Lewis' Patent 

Spray Attachment. 

Can change from solid stream to spray instantly. Regit* 
lar retail price, $6. Weight, 4J lbs. Length, 32 inches. 
For sale by JOHN H. "WHEELER, 
111 LeideBdorff St., S. F. 
P. S.— A sample can he seen at this office. - 



■ B ft I J> Good land tnat will raise a crop exery 
I IB Rl I I year, over L2,i)illl acres for sale in lots to 
I U 111 I I R11 't. Ven desirable Fruit, Vine, Grain, 
tLnllhl Vegetable, Hny, and Pasture Land. 
Near Kail road and Sacramento river; S3 to $30 per acre. 
Wood and water convenient. U. S. Title perfect. Send 
stamp for illustrated circular, to EDWARD FRISBIK, 
Proprietor of Reading Ranch, Anderson, Shasta Co., Cal. 



Remittarcbs to this office should e made by postal order 
or registered letter, when practicable. Cost of postal 
order, for $15 or less, 10 cts. ; for registered letter, in addi- 
tion to regular postage (at ;( cts. per half.nunee), 10 cts, 



July 7, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



Educational. 



St. Augustine College, 

BEN1CIA, CAI, 
1 blrty-flrat Term Opens 

Tl'-SDAY JVM :>I. 18K3, 

At I o'clock. 



RT. RRV J. II. 1>. WINOKIELD, l> D. 



I.I. !>., 
Prcauiuiil. 



W. K Cl M4.t-IKI.AIN. JR. 



T. A. ROBLNHOK 




JAipipg Copipapie?. 



Persons interested in inco. porations will 
do well to recommend tue puiliouion of 
the omciul notices of their comp 
this paper, us the cheapest appropriate 
medium for advertising. 



LIFE SCHOLARSHIPS, $70. 

Paid In Installments, $76. 

*yS"inl t >r cfrcaUra. 



VlST. 



llA 



MARY'S HALL 

BENICIA. CAL. 
THE ISTEJXT TERIM: 

SEMINARY FOR YOUNG LADIES 

H itti full graduating course, ami departments 

■ ■! Modern Languages, Music and 

Art, « ill commence on 

Thursday August 3, 1883. 

X< For Catalogues *fitli full particulai 
for idmUwon, adaram 

Rkv, I. DRI.OH U VNSFII 1. 1', A. M., 

IUv 



SACKETT 

(FOK BOYS) 

SCHOOL. 



Takes first rank fur thoroughness 

and ability of its teachers; aUo 

for homo care. 

Business, clUHSl'*al, and 
ICn^-lihli Department*. 

Next Term commences July Kith 
Send for Cata o^ue to 

D. P. SACKETT, A. M., Principal, 

OAKLAND. CAL. 



5,000 


■ ■ 


..,.««. 


rs ocj 


5,000 


:i;:. on 


5,000 




1,000 


;.. 00 


1,000 


TB 'Ml 


1,000 


. o | 


1,000 


:;. oo 


1,000 


7.". IHI 


1, 


7fi 00 


I.INIO 


rs i m i 


1.IMIO 


;.*. ihi 


1,000 


76 ihi 


I.INMI 


..- 00 


500 


::; :.i. 


500 


tl M 


;,i h i 


87 50 





87 50 





:'.: 50 


.rlMI 


87 50 


500 


:;: 50 


500 


i 


;.imi 


37 50 


500 


87 50 


1,1 Mill 


300 no 


ooo 


i>7 .".ii 


DO 


'i 75 


5,000 


::,;, ihi 


5,000 


37B mi 


;.,immi 


375 00 


1,000 


367 50 


loo 


7 ,,i 


5,000 


37B 


5,000 


375 hi 


:.,imhi 


:;, 5 m 


">,IMMI 


375 im 


5,000 


375 in 


10,000 


,;*t in 


100 


7 5) 


4 . S ii I 


366 7." 


nlerof tl 


3 Board 



THE CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Seat in Gold Mining Company.— Location 

; 

win i i. Ilnauent up i 

' took, "ll :i.-<'. lU 

\prii in, i |»paeitc ihi rami - 

oi tin n -i- follow**: 

s,. \., 

Mi lit. 

I 10 

Ales |o 

Martin. \ I | 

7 

Uartin, ■, i S 

I, TniHtoc D 

I.. 

... II 

I 18 

Martin, v. Tni-i. . 13 

h . .. Ii 
K t Trustee i:. 

Martin, '.!.:■■ i? 

Uartin, \. Trustee i* 

10 

Martin, 1,1 , 20 

Martin, \, Trustee ji 

Martin, \. Trustee 22 

Martin, \, Trustee 

Martin, A, Trustee 84 

Martin, A, Trustee '-!!"■ 

Martin, A, Trust,.,' 2H 

Martin, \, Trustee 27 

Martin, \, Trustee 88 

Martin. A, Trustee 23 

Martin, A. TriMrr 80 

Martin. A. Trustee SI 

I lav is, Jonu A 32 

Mn-fin, \. Trustee 38 

Martin. A, Truster M 

Martin. ,\, Trustee 36 

Martin, A, Trustee 36 

Kellogg, U w 37 

Martin. A, Trustee 88 

Martin, I, Trustee . 80 

Martin, A. Trustee Ill 

Martin, A. Trustee ..41 

Martin, A, Trustee 12 

Martin. A. Trustee 13 

l-'i-'in i , rlcrl ha C 4.t 

Cornwall, PR 16 

Ami in accordance with law and an 

of Directors, mad i the joth daj of April. 1883, bo mail] 

shares ol each parcel of said stock as may in.' necessary, 

will be sold at public auction, at 528 Califoruin St., R n 

ii, San Francisco, Cal., on TUESDAY, the 5th da} of June, 
1883, at the hour ol i o'clock i*. w. of said daj . to paj said 
delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of ad 
vertisiug and expenses of sain. 

\. M VRTTK, Secretary. 
OFFICE -Room o", 528 California St., San Francisco, 
California. 



Sporting, Cannon, Mining, Blasting and 

HERCULES POWDER 

HBBCULES I'<IW 1>KK will break ni un rock, is stronger, safer au J better than any other 
Explosive in use, and is the only Nitroglycerine Powder chemically compounded to neutralize 
the poisonous fumes, notwithstanding bombastic and pretentious claims by others. 

It derives lis uamo from IIikcclbs, the most famous barool Qreok Mythology, who was (rifted with superhuman 
strength. On one occasion hu ilev inlaw] ppoasdnun, and with one blow of 

bil club broke a high mountain Irmu summit to base. 



No. 1 XX is tho Strongest Explosive Known. 

No. 2 la superior to anv powder of that grade. 

PATENTED IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE. 

ORDERS RECEIVED FOR HERCULES CAPS AND FUSE. 

JOHN F. LOHSE, SECY. 
Office, No. 230 California Street - - San Francisco, Cal. 



Joseph Roylance. 




Robert Dalziel. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

BRASS WORKS! 

Munufacl rsof :,ll kin, lai .f 

Brass Goods for Plumbers, 

GAS AND STEAM FITTERS, 
Importers of 

Iron Pipe and Plumbers' Materials. 

I III and 115 MISSION STREET, S. F. 

T. W. JBFPRBSS, Salesman. 



William Moller. 




THE HARMON SEMINARY, 



A FIRST-CLASS BOARDING SCHOOL 
FOR YOUNG LADIES. 



lor Catalogues or othc 
HARMON, Berkeli y, Cal., 
Street, San Francisco. 



information, address s. s. 
r K. J. WlCKSON, 411 Clay 



THE HOME SEMINARY, 

San Jose, California. 

hi. orforaicd tSSl. 

FOR YOUNG LADIES AND MISSES. 

Next Toim begl s August 15, 1883. 



For Partlculari and Term-, of Tuition, Address 
MISS M. S. CASTLEMAN, Principal. 



LAUREL HALL. 

Home School for Toimg Ladies andCMMreii. 

The Twentieth Annua! SesBion will commence Thurs 
day, August 2, 1883. 

This Institution offers to a limited number advantages 
of the highest order, having a large corps of svell-known 
teachers who eive individual care and treatment to each 
pupa Address MBS. L. MANSON-BUCKMAVTER, 
San Mateo, Cal. 



POSTPONEMENT. 

Tin- ahoi c s:i le of delinquent stock is hereby postponed 
to THURBDAVp the 28fch ria.v of June, U383, al I o'clock 
. h., ;u the same place. Bj order of the Board "f T>i- 
■ctors. A. MARTTN, Secretary. 

Sau Kraneisco, June 0, 1883. 

The above sale "i delinquent stock is hereby postponed 
i THURSDAY, Jul] 26, 1883, at 1 o'clouk p. n.,af the 
mi.' place. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. MARTIN, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 28, 1883. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF THE 

Standard Consolidated Mining Company. 

San Francisco, July 'J, 1883. 
At a meeting' of the Board of Directors of the above 
named company held this day, Dividend No. 56, of twenty 
five cents (25c.) per -.bar.-, was declared, payable THURS 
DAY, July 12. 1883, at the Farmers' Loan and Trust Com 
pany, in Now York, or at the office in this city. 

WILLIAM WILLIS, Secretary. 
OFFICE— Room No. -2D, Nevada block, No. :!09 Mont, 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



"W^illiam Hawkins. 

(SUCCESSOR TO HAWKINS <fe CANTRBLL). 

210 and 212 Beale Street, bet. Howard and Folsom Sts., - - San Francisco. 

Manufacturer of 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES. 

FOB MINING AND OTHER PURPOSES. 

Also of the HAWKINS' PATENT ELEVATOR HOIST, for Hotels, Warehouses 
and Public Buildings. 

Steam Engines and all Kinds of Mill and Mining Machinery. 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

RAILROAD AND MERCHANT IRON, 

ROIJ.BD BlSAMS, ANGLE. CHANNEL AND T IRON, BRIDGE AND MACHINE J-.OLTS, LAG SCREWS, NUTS 
WASHERS, ETC., STEAMBOAT SHAFTS, CRANKS, PISTONS, CONNECTING RODS, ETC., ETC. 

Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Hammered Iron of Every Description. 

SCRAP IRON 



IRVING INSTITUTE. 

YOUNG LADIES' BOARDING SCHOOL. 

1036 Va'cnc a St , San Francisco. 

Tbe building haj been enlarged and n fitted. Tbe next 
session will commence July 23d. For catalogue, addres3 

REV. EDWARD B. CHURCH, A.M., 
Principal. 

THE HOME SCHOOL 

FOR 

YOTTXTG LADIES, 

1825 Telegraph Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



Organized in 1S72. 
stYcar begins on WEDNESDAY 
MISS L. A. FIELD, 



, JULY 25, 1883 

Principal 



Don't Fail to Write. 

Should this paper I" received by any subscriber who 
does not ward it, or beyond the time they intend to pay 
for it, let them not fail to write us direct to stop it. A 
postal card (costing one cent only) \Vill snhVi:. Wc 
will not knowingly send the paper to anyone who does 
not wish it, but if it is continued, through the failure of 
tbe subscriber to notify us to discontinue it, or some 
irresponsible party requested to stop it, we shall positively 
demand payment for the time it is sent, 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF THE 

Bulwer Consolidated Mining Company 

San Francisco, June 21, 1883. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above 
named compan} ■ held this day, Dividend No. IS, of fifteen 
ceute (15c.) per share, was declared, payable on Monday, 
July 2,1888. Transfer books dosed on Saturday, June 23, 
1883, at 12 o'clock m. This dividend is payable at the 
Farmers' Loan and Trust Company in New York, on all 
stock issued there, and at the office in this citj on all 
stock issucdherc. WM. WILLIS. Secretary. 

OFFICE -Room 20, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould and Curry Silver Mining Company. 

ASSESSMENT No. >■"■. 

Iiino 15, 188:1 

lulv 20, 1883 

August 13, 1883 

Fifty fonts per sharo. 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office -Room No. 69, Nevada Block, Nn. 309 Mont- 
gforoery Street, Sau Francisco, CaK 



HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR 
■ Orders SoUclted and Promptly Executed. 

Offlco. No. 



FiOi'. Market at.. UNION BuOCK. 



Levied 

Delinquent 
Day nl Sale 
Amount. . . . 



Carson and Colorado Eailroad. 

(NARROW-OATJOE.) 

The Company aunouncee the completion of tin line March 
] 1S82. to OANDELARIA. Columbus Mining District, Ea- 
meraltla Co. , Nev,. IPS miles Irotn Mouud Hone ( T un I'iou 
with Virginia and Truckee Railroad). 

STAGE CONNECTIONS, 

At Hawthorne with U. S. Stage Company's daily coaches 
for Aurora 126 in.); Bodie (37 m.lj Lit u.ly and Bridgeport. 

At Luning (125 miles fiom Mound House) with Gilmer, 
Salisbury &Co.'a tri-weeily stages (leaving Tuesday, Thurs- 
day and Saturday mornings) for Grantsville, Belmont and 
Tybo. 

At Belleville (150 miles from Mound HouBe) with Bellevil'e 
and Independence SUge Co. 'a stages for ben'on (40 it.), 
Bishop Crei-k, Big I'iue and Independence. 

At Candelarla, with U. 8. Stage Co. 's stag^u for Col^ir- 
bus (S m ), Silver Peak, Montezuma, Alida Valley, Ciiii 
Mountain, etc. 

THROUGH TICKETS 
To tbe above points for sale at San Francisco, Sacra. n -ii' 1 
Reno, Carson and Virginia R. R, Ticket officeH, 

This is the direct and natural route for Passengers and 
Freight, to points in Sou them Nevada, Mono and Inyo 
emu ties, California. The line, laid with steel rxil3 and led- 
wood ties and equipped wi thnew and lirst-elass rolling stock, 
ia penetrating new and most promising Mining Distri-ts 
whi ch are now attracting deserved attention throughout t he 
country. 

Eur inform ation on through freight rates apply to 

H. M. yERINGTON, D. A. BENDER. 

Goal Sup«. Oon'J Freight ft Pass. Agent 

* Carson, Nev. 



Inventors utoiraKiR. 

258 Market St., N. E. cor. Front, up-staire, San Era "clsco 
Experimental machinery and all kinds of rca.iels, tin, cop- 
per and brass work 



C. H. AARON, 

(MSOLTfflG AND PRACTICAL METALLURGIST, 

AUTHOR OF 

" Testing and Working Silver Ores; Lcacliing' Gold 
and Silver Ores." 

Mines Examined as to Practical Value. 

Address, PINAL, ARIZONA. 



TUB Pacific Riral Press, a most excellent publication 
with the beginning of the new year donned a new and ex- 
ceedingly neat typographical dress. Its reading columns 
needed no improvement.— A la rneda Encinal. 



WATER TANKS. 




Over 700 of our well-known Water Tanks put in service 
last year. These tanks are mad e by machinery, from tbe 

best'of mateiials, and shipped to all parts of the country 
Each piece numbered. Wo skill required in setting up. 

WELLS, RUSSELL & CO., 

MECHANICS' MILL?. 
Cor. Mission & Fremont EtH., San Francisco 



ORE IVi VBRIZKR. — The rotary ore pulverizer, advertised 
in another column a> Tor --ale by Mr. Heald, has been used 
hul very slightly, and is a bargain to any tme in want ,.f 
such a machine. It isonly sold because the company which 
ordered it is dissolved, and there is no possible use for it. 
All the necessary gearing, frame, etc., go with the pulver- 
izer, which can be set running in half an hour after it is 
received. Parties needing something which will grind ore 
line, will do well to communicate with Mr. Healdi 
i hia ii iac bine. 



Dewey &Co, 



f 252 

( Market s 



Patent Agt's. 



14 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 7, 1883 



Iron and (flacliipe W$. 



F. P. BiCON, Prea. 0. L. Pouts, Sec'y. 

The Globe Iron Works Co., 

Manufacturers and Repairars of all kinds of 

MACHINERY AND IRON CASTINGS, 

AND BUILDERS OF 

Mining Madmen. Port- 
id Marine Engines. 

Office and Works— 222 and 224 Fremont St.. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
i^-A^ente for C. H. Baker'a Mining Horse Power; 
fcifhup's Mining Pump Apparatus; C. H. Baker's Quick- 
silver Feeder. 



Oakland Jron Works. 

We are now prepare d to do all kinds of 

Heavy and Light Castings and Machinery 

Marine and Stationery Engines, Rock Breakers, Stamp 
Mills, Pumping Machinery, Donkey Engines, etc. 



COKE. P ATENT . COKE. 

This COKE is exclusively uaed by Prof. Thomas Price, in his aaBay office, by the Selby 
Smelting and Lead Co., Prescott, Scott & Co., Eisdon Iron and Locomotive Works and others in 
this city. Large supplies are regularly forwarded to consumers in Salt Lake and Nevada, to the 
Copper Queen Mining Co., Longfellow Copper Mining Co. and other consumers in Arizona. 

The undersigned are in receipt of regular supplies from Cardiff, Wales, and offer the COKE 
for sale in quantities to suit purchasers. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

316 California St., San Francisco. 



Good Facilities for Shipping on Cars. 

u/orka Located Cor. Second and Jefferson 
Streets, Oakland. 

SCOVILLB & CO. 

UNION IRON WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO. CAL. 
ROOT, NIBLSON & CO., 

MANUFACTURBRS OF 

STEAM ENGINES, BOILERS AND ALL 
Kinds of Machinery for Mining Purposes. 

Flouring Mills, Saw Mills and Quartz Mills Machinery 
constructed, ntted up and repaired. 

Front Street, Between N and O Streets, 

BACRAMBNTO, CAL. 




Berry & Place Machine Go. 

* PARKE & LACY. Pronrletors. 



No. S California Street, 

San Francisco, 

CAL. 

Importers and Dealers In every 
Variety of 




GARDNER 
GOVERNOR. 



Wood and iron Working Machinery, 

STEAM PUMPS, 

% Stationary. Portable and H. istiiijr Engines and Boilers 
Sawmills, Shingle Mills. Emery Wheels and Grind- 
ers* Gardner Governors, Planer Knives, Sand 
Paper in Rolls, together with a general line 
of Mining and Mill Supplies, includ- 
j-^g* 5, ing Leather Belting, Kubher Belt- 

ing Packing and Hose. 
t3T Catalogues furnished on jApplication. JB9 




i_.i.i>. W. Prescott, President. 
luviNt. M. Scott, Gen'l Manager. 



M. T. Scott, Vice-Pres't and Treas. 



Gko. W. Dickib, Managei 
.r. O'B. Guns, Secretary, 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works, 

Manufacture Iron Castings and Machinery 
of all Kinds at Greatly Reduced Rates. 

STEVENSON'S PATENT 

Mold-Board AMALGAMATORS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

First St.. between Howard & Folsom, S. F. 

California Brass Foundry, 

No. 125 First Street, Opposite Minna. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

All kinds ol Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt 
Metal Castings, Brass Ship Work ol all kinds, Spikes, 
Sheathing Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steam- 
boat Bells and Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks 
and Valves, Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Coup- 
lings and Connections of all sizes and patterns, furnished 
with dispatch. ta,PRICES MODERATE. "S» 

J. H. WEED. V. KINGWELL. 

California Machine Works, 

WM. H. BIRCH, 

Engineer and Machinist, 

119 Beale Street, San Francisco. 

Portable and Double Sawmills, Steam Engines, Flour, 

Quartz aud Mining Machinery. Brodie's Patent Rock Crusher 

PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

No. 1 Crusher, 4 tons per hour 3450.00 

" 2 " 6 625.00 

- 3 " S 925.00 

•' " 1500 lbs " " 150.00 

The Best Crusher iu the Market and at the LoweBt Prices. 
Power, Hydraulic Ram or Cylinder Elevators, Hand Power 
Hoists, for sidewalks any purpose. Saw Arbors and Mill 
Fittings. Repairing promptly attended to 

STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

Of all sizes — from 2 to 60-Horse power. Also, Quartz 
Mills, Mining Pumps, Hoisting Machinery, Shafting, iron 
Tanks, etc. For sale at the lowest prices by 

J. HENDY, 49 and 61 Fremont Street, S. V. 

THOMAS THOMPSON. THORHTON THOMPSON. 

THOMPSON BROTHERS, 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

and 131 Beale St. , between Mission and Howard, S. F. 

MANCTPAOTdRBRS OF CASTINGS OP BVBRT BBBORUTION. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Office, 61 First St. | Cor. First & Mission Sts., S. F. | P. 0. Box 2128. 



BUILDERS OF 



STEAM, AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Agents of the Cameron Steam Pump. 

Home Industry.— All Work Tested and Guaranteed. 

Vertical Engines, Baby Hoists, Stamps.. 

Horizontal Engines, Ventilating Fans, Pans, 

Automatic Cut-off Engines, Rock Breakers, Settlers, 

Compound Condensing Engines, Self-Feeders, Retorts 

Shafting, Pulleys, Etc., Etc. 

TRY OUR MAKE, CHEAPEST AND BEST IN USE. 

UNION IRON WORKS. 



Sbnd foil Lats Circulars. 



Successors to PHKSCOTT, SCOTT & CO. 




GOLD QUARTZ and PLACER MINERS' 

Silver Plated 

A.DVE-A.LC3--A.3^^.TiasrC3- PLATES, 

For Sii-v'ing: Gold. 

Every description of plates for Quartz MillB and Wet or Dry Placer Auialga 
mator Machines made to order, corrugated or plain. 

OVER 2,000 ORDERS FILLED. - 
The moBt extensive and successful manufacturer of these plates in the 
United States. Will fill orders for delivery in Rocky Mountain and Pacific 
Coast Milling States at lower prices than any other manufacturer. 

O'd Mining Plates Roplated. Old Plates bought, o 
^old separated for low percentage of resutl. 
SEND FOR PRICE LIST. 

SAN FRANCISCO PLATING WORKS, 

653 & 655 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 
K. G. DKNN'ISTON, Proprietor. 



Corner Beale and Howard Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

■N. H TAYLOR, Pres't. JOSEPH MOORE, Sup't 

Builders of Steam Machinery 

In all its Bkanohks, , 

Steamboat. Steamship, Land 

Engines and Boilers, 

HIGH PRESSURE OR COMPOUND. 



STEAM VESSELS, of all kinds, bnUt complete with 
Hullfj of Wood, Iron or Composite. 

ORDINARY ENGINES compounded when ad- 
visable. 

STEAM LAUNCHES, BargeB and Steam Tugs con- 
structed with reference to the Trado In which they are 
to he employed. Speed, tonnage and draft of water 
guaranteed. 

STEAM BOILERS. Particular attention given to 
the quality of the material and workmanship, anrTjaone 
but first-class work produced. 

SUGAR MILLS AND SUGAR-MAKING 
MACHINERY made after the most approved plans 
Also, all Boiler Iron Work connected therewith. 

WATER PIPE, of Boiler or Sheet Iron, of any size 
made in suitable lengths for connecting together, or 
Bheets rolled, punched, and packed for shipment ready 
to be riveted on the ground. 

HYDRAULIC RIVETING. Boiler Work and 
Water Pipe made by this establishment, riveted by 
Hydraulic Riveting Machinery, that quality of work 
being far superior to hand work. 

SHIP WORK. Ship and Steam Capstans, Steam 
Winches, Air and Circulating Pumps, made after the 
moBt approved plans. 

PUMPS. Direct Acting Pumps, for Irrigation or City 
Water Works purposes, built with the celebrated Davy 
Valve Motion, superior to any other Pump. 




SILVER MEDAL AWARDED 



Mechanics' Fair, 1882, 



Best Upright Engine and Boiler com- 
bined, Best Hoiauug Engine and Boiler 
combined and Best Upright Engine in 
motion to 



W. H. 0HMEN, 



Eagiue Worts, 

103 & 111 Beale St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, 




EXCELSIOR BLASTING POWDER, 

Manufactured, by the 

EXCELSIOR POWDER COMPANY. 

Thiri is no new, patent, non-explosive Safety Powder, but the Genuine 
Standard Nitro G'ycerinc Powder, as safe to use and handle as any other Nitro- 
Glycerine Powder manufactured. The fumes and gases, common in ni tro-glycerine 
powders, are destroyed, and do not leave tbe miner w'tn headache or nausea. 

The powder is put up in cartridges of any eize to sui". the consumer, and is 
exploded in the same manne- as all other.bich exp'osivts; that is, by means of 
cap and fuse, or by electricity. It is not claimed for this powder that it is a 
non-explosive, or safer than other niiro-ulycerine powder. All powdev, and 
eopecially nitro-elvcerine Dowder, i-hou'd be handled carefully. The EXCEL- 
SIOR POWDER is as safe, and for strength far surpasses any other powder on 
the market. Addre 8 all orders t"> 

EXOELSIOR POWDER COMPANY, 



Galena Silver & Copper Ores. 

The PACIFIC WATER JACKET SMELTERS embrace 
many features that are entirely new and of great practi- 
cal utility, which are covered by letters patent. 

No other furnaces can compare with theee for dura- 
bility and in capacity For uninterrupted work. 

MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED of them are now run- 
ning on the Pacific Coast, giving results never before 
obtained as regards continuous running, economy of 
fuel, grade and quality of bullion produced. We are 
prepared to demonstrate by facts the claims hero made. 

These Smelters are chipped in a complete state, requir- 
ing no brick or stone work, except that for the crucible, 
thuB savin g great expenso and loss of time in construc- 
tion, 

Complete smelting plants made to order of any caprcitv 
and with a II* the improvements that experience has bi g- 
gested as valuable in this class of machinery. Skilled ai d 
experienced smelters furnished when desired to supei- 
intend construction and runuintr of furtiaces. Estimates 
given upou application. Send for circular. 

RANKIN, BRAXTON & CO., 

Pacific Iron Works, San Francisco. Chicago 

n nd New York. 



Room 9, No. 3 California St., 



San Francisco, Cal 



Reliance Machine Works, 

CLOT & MEESE, 

Sole Licensed Manufacturers of the 

Medart Patent Wrought Rim Pulley 

For the States of f!aIiforn ; a, Orpgon and Nevada, and the Territories of Idaho, Washington, 

Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Lightest, Strongest, Cheapest and 

Best Balanced Pulley in the World. Also Manufacturers of 

1581 SHAFTING, HANGERS AND APPURTENANCES. 

flSrSBND ?or Circular an ii Prick List. "*£$ 
29 and 13 1 Fremont Street, « SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



FLOUKNOY'S ANTI-SCALE COMPOUND 

FOR STEAM BOILERS. 

Will tffectually rid of scale any steam boiler, and, as 
long as used, prevent its accumulation. Especially 
recommended to parties owning THRESHING MA- 
CHINES. Is entirely free from acids, acting as a pre- 
servator of the iron and a lubricant. Ib recommended 
by the "Scientific American" an the best known. Has 
been used in the U S. Mint of San Franiisco for the 
past two years. Send all orders to 

GEO. FLOURNOY, JR., 

220.V McAllister St., - San Francisco 

George Flournov of the fi of Flournoy, Mhoon & 
Flournoy, Attorneys-at-Law, bove address. 



JOHN L. BOONE, 

Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law, 

Rooms 7, S and 9 , 

No. 320 California Street. S. F„ 

(Over Wells Fargo & Co. 'b Bank. 

Special Attention Paid to Patent Law. 

N. B.— Mr. J. L. Boone has been connected with the 
Patent business for over 15 years, and devotes himself 
almost exclusively to Patent litigation and kindred 
branches. 



Attend to This. 

Our subscribers will find the date they have paid to printed 
on the label of their paper. If it is not correct, or if the 
pape. should ever come beyond the time desired, be sure 
to notify the publishers by letter or postal card. If we are 
not notified within a reasonable time, we canndt be r«r.pon. 
siblc for the errora or omission of agents, 



July 7, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 




With Adi 1 



> Uui-uli Popput Valve Engine, and Fc 



■d Iron Crant Shafts. 



Depot, 



2 1 and 23 Fremont Street S. F. 



NO. 7 IMPROVED 



AIR COMPRESSOR. 



SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

A l.soluto certainty in the action of the valves at any speed. 1'crfcct delivery of. the air at any 
speed or pressure. The heating of the air entirely prevented at any pressure. Takes less water to 
cool the air than any other Compressor. 

Power applied to the best advantage. Access obtainable to all tho valves by removing air cheat 
cov jrs. Kntire absence of springs or friction to open or shut the valves. No valvo stems to break 
and drop inside-of cylinders. 

Have no luck or front heads to break. The only Machine that makes a perfect diagram. Nil 
expensive foundations required. Absolute economy in lirst cost and after working. 

Dl placi&iehts in air cylinder perfect. Showing less leakage and friction than our competitors 
and a superior economy of about 20 per cent. 

Small Sizes made in Sections not to Exceed 300 lbs. 




Tho Knrtlng'B Injector is tho simplest, 
cheapest and beet In ns<>. Will ilraft its 

own water, hot or cold, Mid ( 1 nder 

varying pressure. Send for Circu.ar. 



MACHINERY DDESI^OT. 

H. P. GREGORY & CO., 

Importers and Dealers in Machinery and Supplies. 
Nos. 2 and 4 California Street, S. F. 




SOLE AGENTS FOR 

J. A. Fay A Co., Wood Work- 

ing Machinery. 
Bcment & Son's Machinists 

Tools. 
Blake's Steam Pumps. 
Perry's Centrifugal Pumps. 
Gould's Hand & Power Pumps A 
Perrin's Band Saw Blades. 
Payne's Vertical and Horizontal "^ 

Steam Engines. 
Williamson Bros, Hoisting En- 

gines. 
New Haven Machine Co. 's M.a- 

chiniBtB' Tools. 
Otto Silent Gas Engines. 





SOLE AGENTS FOR ^smjSfi^^^^^^ 1 ^ 



Hoisting Engines of all Kinds. 



Sturtevant's Blowers and Ex- 
hausts. 
Judson's Steam Governors, 
Pickering's Steam Governors. 
Tanite Co. Emery Wheels. 
Nathan & Dreyfus' Oilers. 
Korting's Injectors and Ejec- 
tors. 
Oisston's Circular Saws. 
Frank & Co.'s Wood Working 
Machinery. 
New York Belting & Packine 
Co.'s Rubber Belting, Hose, 
Packing, etc. 
Ballard's Oak Tanned Leather 
Belting. 



BLAKE STEAM PTJMP. 
More Than 16,000 In Use. 




Patented Oct. 11, '81. 




CKIiBBRATBH 

t Ore Roasting and Cliloridiziiis 
FURNACE, 

Working up to 04 per cent of Fire Assaj . 

using -■*> per cent lesB salfcsince 

commencing 1 , aboul a 

year ago. 

;{r MI'KVSKS FOR USK I<'UK]3ALI<:, V. 

Or Furnaces Constructed. 

Address, 

R. A. NEVIN, Patentee. 

(Box 2361.) San Francisco, Cal. 



L. C. MARS HUT/. 



T. O. CANTRELL 



national Iron Works, 

North-west Cor. Main and Howard. Sta., San Francisco, 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES 

At Greatly Reduced Prices. 

HOME INDUSTRY ! AL.I. WORK TESTED AND GUARANTEED ! 

Stationary ana Compound Engines, Flour, Sugar, Quartz and Saw Mills. Anmlga 

zuatlng Macumes. 
CASTINGS AND FORCINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION- 

Sole Manufacturers of Kendall's Patent Ouartz Mills 



STEEL 
CASTINGS 



FROM 1-4 TO 10,000 lbk WEIGHT. 

True to pattern, sound and solid, of uue<(ualed strength, toughness and 
durability. 

An invaluable substitute for forgings or cast-Iron requiring three-fold 
strength. 

Gearing of all kinds, Shoes, Dies, Hammerheads, Orossheadfi for Loco- 
motives, etc, 

15,000 Orauk Shafts aud 10.000 Gear Wheels of this Steel now running 



prove its superiority river other Steel fastings. 
ANK SHAFTS. SHOES, DIES aud GEARING 
Circulars and Price Lists free. Address 



OR 



specialties. 




CHESTER STEEL CASTING CO., 

Worlu. CHESTER. Pa. 407 Library M., PUU.1DEHPHI « 



JAS. LEFFEL'S TURBINE WATER WHEEL, 

The "Old Reliable," 

With Important Improvements, making|it the 

MOST PERFECT TURBINE NOW IN USE, 

Comprising the Largest, and the Smallest Wheels, under both the Highest and 

Lowest head used in this country. Our new Illustrated Book sent free to those 
owning water power. 

Those improving water power should not fail to write us for New Prices, before 
buying elsewhere. New Shops and New Machinery are provided for nmkjjj thid 
WheeL Address 

JAMES LEFFELd CO., 

Springfield, Ohio, and HO Liberty Street, New York City 

PARKE &: X, AG Y. General Agents, 21 & 23 Fremont St- S. F. 

HYDRAULIC GRAVEL ELEVATORS 

For working Hat 
gravel mines that 
have no dump. 

Sluices gravel and 
water up hill on an 
angle of 45°, and 
will run any kind of 
gravel that will run 
i.u a Hume. Handles 

rocks as easy as fine dirt, and will raise as much material as the water will carry oft' in 
on 6 lucnes grade to 12 feet. 

No bedrock cuts, tunnels or drains required Machine a sufjeient drain itself, 
process of mining the same as any other hydraulic mine. Is cow a practical success in 
placrea in California and Oregon. Send for descriptive circular to 

CTOSHITJJL IHISIN-nDY. 

No, 51 Fremont Street Office of the Hydraulic Gravel Elevating Mining Co 




and toe 

vai'oas 



.,S. F 



16. 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July t, 1883 



THE JOHNA.ROEBLING'SSONSCO., 



Manufacturers of 

WIRE ROPE and W^IRE 

Of Every Description. 

For i.i.il.ir i Pliuiei, Standing Eihip Rigging, Suspension Biidgo, Ferris; ioi Mines initiail kinds of 

Heavy HoiB*ing; for StayB a*:d Guys ou Derricks, Grants and Shears; for 

Tillers, Sawmills, Sash Cords, Lightning Gori4uctorff, q§c. 

Qah: 'ii.;ed;nd Plsdii Ve'cgr^ph Vi\r-\ 





Agems for NEW JERSEY WIRE CLOTH CO., 



14 Drumm Street, 



SAN FEANOISCO, OAL. 



THE BJCK THOBN BA.KBBD PEKOE (C ae Pi ere Solid S' ne>.) 



42TSEND FOR CIRCULAR. -SI 



MILL & MINING MACHINERY. 



No. 



CO 



F. A. HUNTINGTON, 

45 Fremont Stieet, - - San Francisco, Ca! 




CD 

CD 






This machine requires less power, lesa care or attention, and is less liable to get out of repair than any concentra- 
tor now in use. All of which any practical miner will comprehend when seeing it in operation. 

The wear and tear is nominal, arid the construction BO simple that any miner can put it up and run it; and the low 
price brings it within the reach of all mill men, as it will save enough to pay for itself in any mill in a very shct 
time. One machine will concentrate the tailings from a five-stamp battery. 



~F. A. HUNTINGTON'S 




$1,000 CHALLEXTGEI 




CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER QUARTZ MILL! 

After runmn c , one of these mills on the Whidden mine, in El Dorado county, over four months, and thoroughly 
testing it,s capacity *nd durability, I am prepared to offer it to the mining public, an.' claimBfor it the following- 
advantages o\cr the drop stamp mill : 

The cost of same capacity is not more than one-half that of stamps. 

Freight to mine one-fourth thao of stamps. 

Gost of erection at. m-ne one-tenth that of stamps. 

It runs with one-third the power per ton of ore crushed. 

The wear i* lead than that of slumps. 

Th3 wearing parts are easily duphca'.ed. 

It has u. n uch hotter discharge, and leavf s the pulp iu bet:.er condition for concentrating 

It is a better Amalgamator, saving fully nine-tenths of the -old in the mill; the lalancc c\i. be aavoO on 
platas in the usual matr.Ler. 

9. It is continually crushiaor; not like the stamp, using power to suspend it in air ninety-nine one-hundredths 
of the time, and the b^nc; making a thun Jering noise, and accomplishing omi-uHrti/tw^/ small results. It is aB f ir 
in advance of the stamp n-ui as the pre:ent method of making ii >ur with improved rolls is ovr the Indian's 
crushing corn m a stone mortar. 



i mode o£ 



„. F A : EUNTINGFOX, 2iM,'.-DEAit Sir: Your Centrifugal Roller Quartz Mill has run on the Whidden Gold 
Mining U>mp:mys property, at Shingle Springs, El Dorad > county, Gil., about four months, and it did good and 
sati ,fa:tory worn; a greater portion of gold remaining in the mill thau in a stamp battery. 

FRtfD. JONES, Eupt. 

SHINGLE MACHINES AND SAWMILL MACHINERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



r,. M. STARR. 



CI. H. HALTER. 



/ETNA IRON WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

IRON CASTINGS AND MACHINERY 
of all Kinds. 

MARINE, STEAM, AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Mining Machinery a Specialty. 

217, 219, and 221 FRBVEONT ST., - - SAN FRANCISCO, 

MALTER, LIND & CO., Agents, 189 Broadway, New Yorfe. 



THE FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR, 

— OR— 

VANNING MACHINE. 

Over 400 are now n use, glvlui; entire satisfaction. Saves from 40 to 100 per cent, more than auy other Con- 
centrator in use, and concentrations are clean from the first working. The wear and tear are merely nominal. 

A machine can be seen hi working order, and ready to make teats, at the office «■' Hinckley, Spiers & HayeB, 220 
Fremont Street. 

To those intending to manufacture or purchase the so-called "Triumph" Concen- 
trator, we herewith state: 

That legal advice has been given that all shaking i notion applied to an endless traveling belt used for concen- 
tration of ores is an infringement on patents held and owned by the Frue Vanning Machine Company. 

ihat suit has been coramoncod in New York against an end-shake machine similar to the Triumph, and that as 
soon as decision is reached in the courts there, proceedings will be taken agai ust all Western infringements. 

That the patent laws make users of infringements responsible as well as makers, and the public is therefore 
warned that there is considerable risk in purchasing any end-shake machine until our various patentB have been 
decided. 

That if there are those who for any reason prefer an end-shake machine, we can manufacture and sell to such a 
machine of that description, as efficient as the Triumph, and at a lower price, and no liability for infringement will 
thun be incurred by the purchaser. 

That we shall protect ourselves against any one making, selling or using any machine infringing any of our 
patents. Patented July 9, 1807; May 4, 1869; Dec. 22, 1874; Sept. 2, 1879; April 27, 1830. Patents applied for. 

That we are, and have been, ready at any time, to make a competitive trial aguiiiBt the Triumph, or any other 
machine, for stakes of ■■■!, 

ADAMS & CARTER, Agents Frue Vanning Machine Company, 



Room 7. 109 California Street, 
Nov. 6, 1082. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



The best of Our U. S. and Foreign Patent Agency pre 

sents many and important advantages as a Home 
Agency over all others, by reason of long estab- 
lishment, great experience, thorough system, in- 
timato acquaintance with the subjects of inven- 
tions in our own community, and our most 
extensive law and reference library containing 
official American and foreign reports, files of 
scientific aud mechanical publications, etc. All 
worthy inventions patented through our Agency 
will have the benefit of an illustration or a 
description in the Mining and Scie ntxbto 
Press. We transact every branch of Patent 
business, and obtain Patents in all countries 
which grant protection to inventors. The 
large majority of U. S. and Foreign Patents 
issued to inventors on the Pacific Coast have 
been obtained through our Agency. We can 
give the best and most reliable advice as to the 
patentability of new inventions. Our prices are 
as low as any first-class agencies in the Eastern 
I hrOUgn JJewey <& CO. S bCien- States, while our advantages for Pacific Coast 

inventors are far superior. Advice and Circu- 




tific Press Patent Agency. 

No. 252 Market St. Elevator, 12 Front St., N. F. 

Telephone No. 658. 



lars free. DEWEY & CO., Patent Agents. 



A. T. DEWKV. 



W. B. KWER 



GEO. H. STRONG 



r 







y 



siiSHPtaf 



THE CONSUMERS' COMPANY. 

VULCAN B B, 

Black. G-lazseca. rE^o-vc-der, 

In kegs and cases. The Beat Low Grade Explosive in the market. Uontains no Nitro 
Glycerine. Superior to Judson or auy Elack Powder made. 

Is Unequaled for Bank Blasting & Railroad Work. 

VULCAN NOS. I, 2 AND 3, 

The Strongest, Most Uniform and best Nitro Glycerine Towder manufactured, au 
which we are prepared to furnish at very lowest prices. 

Caps and Fuse of all Grades at Bottom Rates. 
VTJLOA.1T POWDER CO., 

.218 California St., San Francisco, 




An Illustrated Journal of 






BY DEWEY & CO., 
Publishers. 

Stampedes and Stock Gambling. 

I method mo I often have I b 

ioua and mobile ol "in population bad 
eking to acquire suddeu 
wealth or recuperate thi orl tines. 

i he business of gold 
ruining Exclusively obtained, this propi tisii . 
fonnd expression in the old-fashioned Btampede, 
i hough it led to some loss and hard 
ship, v. ■ lively harmless, the stain- 

not much besides his time, and 
mly n.li small sinus as had been ex- 
pended in "out-fitting 1 ' the adventurer. 

With ol the I omstock lode 

and the outgrowth of that event, the establish- 
ment of Stock Boards, there was inaugurated 
the practice of dealing in mining Bhares, 
which, however it may have made fortunes 
for the few, and afforded the venture- 
some classes a convenient medium for gam- 
bling, lias resulted only in harm to the many. 
It is not our purpose now to recount the effects 
business 'luring the past '20 years: suf- 
fice 1 1 1 - i\ ! it has been most malign; falling like 
a blight on every class, pursuit and interest of 
our people. It has proved ruinous to thousands, 
and these belonging mostly to that middle rank 
in society, who earn what they spend and can 
but illy afford to lose what they earn. Nor 
do we intend at this writing to arraign the 
in, null., have been responsible for so much 
cli i ter and suffering, our object just now be- 
ing to simply warn these men that another of 
these raids on the laboring classes of the in- 
vesting public had better not again be at- 
tempted. 

During the few years that have elapsed since 
the subsidence of the stock-dealing furor, our 
working people— that ib, such of them as bad not 
become wholly bankrupted and ruined — have 
partially recovered from the effects of that busi- 
ness. Cured of the craze that so long afflicted 
them, they have deserted the halls of the stock- 
sharp and the dens of the manipulator, and 
once more betaken themselves to work, content 
with the earnings of their respective voca- 
tions. Debts contracted have been paid up; 
homesteads have been relieved of incum- 
brances ; lots have been bought and new houses 
built, and little hoards have again begun to be 
laid up in the savings banks. 

Hut, now that something of the old-time pros- 
perity and contentment have been restored, we 
may look for an effort being made by the wily 
operator to capture the coin of the toiling 
masses. For some time past a scheme has been 
maturing for getting up a .stock boom, and un- 
binding the worthless rubbish that has been 
accumulating in a few hands on the unsuspect- 
ing public. As yet, not much headway has 
been made with this nefarious business, princi- 
pally because the public cannot now be victim- 
ized as easily as aforetime, and partially be- 
cause the newspapers on this coast, including 
those that make stock operations a specialty, 
have refused to promote or even encourage any 
movement of the kind. Our entire population 
are now so heartily sick of this form of gam- 
bling, that it can never hope to be reinstated 
here in anything like its pristine vigor. Even 
in the Atlantic States, where it never became 
so wide-sprejrd as here, it is being regarded 
with such distrust that the number of its vo- 
taries has fallen off largely of late. 

It is to be observed, too, that Eastern invest- 
ors do not submit to be imposed upon as tamely 
as has been the practice among us, parties there 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1883. 



seeking red res of their grievances in the 
courts, which are apt to regard complaints of 

tliis kind with favor. A number of suits air 
now pending iii that section of country, brought 
bo '", cover money paid for properties known to 
lie worthless, or of little value. Borne of these 
suits relating to transactions in stocks. Several 
operators, onOO prominent on this side of the 
continent, are said to be threatened with suits 
of this kind. It is also reported that a work 
of a rather sensational character, is being pre- 
pared and wilt soon he published in New York. 
As this work emanates from an insider, and 
will make some spicy revelations touching one 
or two old time San Francisco operators now 
domiciled in \e\v York, it promises to make a 
stir in mining circles. It will, also, so the 
story goes, tend to relieve parties on whom the 

Odium of the State Line deal has thus far 
rested, Of some share of that burden, and trans- 



The Forthcoming Report of the 
rector of the Mint. 



I)i- 



Prom advance sheets of the report ol II. *'. 
Burehai'd, Director of the Mint for iss-j, we 
gather the following information in regard to 
the product <if bullion in California for that 
year. The output of gold amounted to $16,- 
800.0(1(1, silver $14fi,000, making a total of 
510,945,000, being $1,300,000 less than the 
product of 1381. This diminution is attributed 
by Mr. Burchard to a falling off in the product 
of the Standard mine, at Bodie, amounting to 
,S!I00,0(>0, ami of the hydraulic mines, some of 
which were prevented from running by injunc- 
tions issued from the courts. To these causes 
might have been added the fact that gold min- 
ing in < lalifornia has, for the past two or three 
years, been in a sort of transition state-foreign 
capital withheld and not much home capital 




MODIFIED CHINESE PUMP. 



fer the same to certain "honest miners" living 
on this side. 

Hut this publishing books and going to law 
as a means of redressing wrongs or recovering 
money foolishly expended, is costly, vexatious 
and uncertain, and, however it may suit eastern 
investors, who have been wronged and robbed, 
has never been popular with Californians, who, 
when they have been taken in by stock sharps 
or otherwise made a bad venture, have shown 
themselves disposed to submit quietly rather 
than make open complaint, as perhaps they 
more generally ought to have done. The better 
way, however, is to avoid exposing one's self to 
be cheated, as one is very certain to be if he 
suffers himself to be enticed into taking a hand 
at the strap game, pjr dealing much in these 
mining shares. 



Tmk wastage at the Mint under the present 
Superintendent in the coinage of S-20,000,000 
fold and silver during the past year was less 
than SI, 000. This is a splendid record. 



The Cholera, which has been raging in the 
cities of northern Egypt, has appeared" in Ber- 
lin, rendering its spread over Europe, probable. 



coming in to take its place. Not this year, but 
next, we may look for an advance in the bullion 
product of the State, and which, .once begun, 
may be expected to be kept up for a number of 
years thereafter. 

There has been some fault found with the 
year's output of bullion assigned by the Mint 
Director to certain localities. This originated, 
at least in one instance, from a figure having 
been left out of the returns made by that official, 
as telegraphed on from Washington. This was 
in the case of Nevada county, which, as will be 
seen, by consulting the table we publish, is 
credited by the Director with 83,510,000, all 
that it is justly entitled to ; nor do we think 
that any other county has just reason to com- 
plain in the premises. Were the Director of 
the Mint to adopt the estimates of local authori- 
ties we would be able to make a right royal ex- 
hibit of gold here in California. And it would 
seem that Mr. Burchard, in deference to this 
class of authorities, made his aggregate figures 
somewhat larger than those of certain very 
competent statisticians on this coast. Never- 
theless, we are of the opinion that his returns 
closely approximate the production actually 
made, as closely, in fact, as it is possible to do. 



VOLUME XLVJI 
Number 2. 

Foi mure full and detailed information on this 
subjeol we refer the reader to the article pre- 
pared by Mr. Burchard, '•- bi fonnd in another 

column. 



Special Students at the University. 

The next, year's work at the University of 
( lalifornia will begin the second week in Auguc t , 
The coming class, according to indications inv 
uished by the June examinations, will be larger 
than for several years. The institution i.^ now 
in excellent condition; some cases of discipline 
during the last few years have had a wholesome 
effect, and the moral and working quality of 
the students has been very satiafaetoi J 

The question often arises as to what a young 
man can do at the University who has not time 
nor means to pursue a regular four years' course. 
Provision is made for such students. Those 
applicants of suitable age, who can pass an ex- 
amination showing that they are qualified to 
profit by the instruction given, are allowed, 
under the advice of the Faculty, to make up a 
"Partial Course" from the essentially agricul- 
tural studies, and such other topics as may be 
most important hi view of previous attainments. 
Graduate of High Schools, Academies and other 
institutions giving thorough drill in the usual 
English studies and a fair start in the natural 
sciences, can in two years acquire that which 
should lie of great value to those who wish to 
pursue agriculture intelligently. 

The privilege of being a "Special Student of 
one or more subjects without a full schedule is 
granted only to those of mature character ami 
age. Although these two classes of students 
are not candidates for degrees, they can on 
leaving obtain certificates showing what studies 
have been pursued, and with what success. 
Students who work in the analytical labora- 
tories are charged for chemicals and other ma- 
terials used. 

Persons not members of the University may 
obtain permission to attend any course of lec- 
tures by application to the Faculty, or to the 
lecturer, giving the course. 

Thus the.- institution is open to those wdio 
cannot avail themselves of all its benefits, and 
the accommodating conditions arranged by the 
Faculty should lead all who can to enroll them- 
selves for the coming year. 



California Pump. 

The California pump is essentially a chain 
pump. A rectangular box, about 10x3 inches, 
inside measurement, and ranging from 10 to 30 
feet in length, according to need, is traversed 
by an endless flexible, band or belt of canvas, 
on one side of which arc securely lixed, at in- 
tervals, wooden discs, nearly as large as the in- 
side of the box. The lower end of the box is 
furnished with a roller, round which the belt 
passes, and is immersed in the water to be raised 
from the pit, while the upper end delivers the 
water into a trough, or launder, by which it is 
carried away. At the upper end, the belt passes 
round a second roller or drum, which is made 
to revolve by either hand or water power. 

This pump, a simple and efficient ai)paratus, 
is a modification of the Chinese pump, having 
been originally introduced here by that people. 
The principle on wdiich it is operated belongs to 
them, though we have greatly improved on the 
original structure, which was made wholly of 
wood. Even the belt was composed of short 
pieces of board, hinged together with wooden 
pinSi 



18 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 14, 1883 



Correspondence, 

From Vulture to Prescott, Arizona. 

| From our Arizona Correspondent.] 
Copper Mining. 

From Vulture to Prescott there is a scope of 
hills and valleys of sixty miles, affording several 
different cattle ranges, ample room for cattle on 
a thousand hills, and feed for a thousand cattle 
to graze on one hill. The stock of cattle 
noticed seemed to be generally of very good 
grade of American stock, and the same with a 
few exceptions is true of the horse stock, and 
all having plenty of feed on the open domain. 

The Securing of a Spring 
Or well with water in it is securing the control 
of a large scope of country. Sixteen miles from 
Vulture over the old quartz road brings you to 
Wickenburg — rather where it once was — a 
busy, bustling little town with a forty-stamp 
mill and several stores, saloons and hotels. Now 
it is almost a deserted camp. The village smith, 
finding his steel and iron bars of little demand, 
opens a small refreshment bar for the wayfar- 
ing man. A store and postoffice and a board- 
ing-house, and stage station with a U. S. Tele- 
graph and supply |depot, for government trains, 
now comprises the major portion of what used 
to be a very lively town. The concentration 
works of M. Salsbury, Supt. of Benson Smelt- 
ing Co., now erecting there for operations 
on the old Vulture tailings, and the renewed in- 
terest taken in more thoroughly prospecting 
this locality will somewhat revive the town and 
fill some empty houses. From Wickenburg, 
sixteen miles by the old wagon road, shows only 
rough , rolling pasture land with but one settler 
till you arrive at J. R. Frink's stock ranch, 
where are excellent water privileges and an im- 
mense range occupied by his numerous bands of 
horses and cattle. HeremyPimoDaisy,byaspecial 
breach of trust, took a promenade with common, 
loose stock, and cost 

A Three Days' Search 
Before she could be captured and brought to a 
proper line of duty. I felt perfectly satisfied 
that Mr. Frink had ample scope for more than 
40,000 horses to feed and fatten. Ten miles 
and 20 miles are common distances between 
these different watering springs and stock 
ranges. 

In Skull valley arc several families of farm- 
ers and stock men, and a thriving school, with 
a literary society, organized for literary and 
social improvement. One cheese dairy of 24 
cows was running, finding ready sale for the 
cheese. The hay cut always has ready sale at 
good prices, either at home or at Prescott, 20 
miles to the northeast, over good mountain 
roads. 

Prescott, 
The territorial capital, and county seat of 
Yavapai county, with a population of about 
2,500, is very pleasantly located in the midst 
of granite hills and mountains, and surrounded 
with pine forests, which, with the elevation of 
5,500 feet, insures abundance of cool, refresh- 
ing breezes. The city is, in all its features, 
American — that means regular, wide streets, 
kept clean ; good business houses and substan- 
tial public buildings, and a mild city govern- 
ment. Of the business portion, the center 
block was left an open plaza, and now contains 
the county Court House, built of brick, two 
stories above basement, with cupola and town 
clock. There are five churches, a large two- 
story brick public school building, a dramatic 
and theatrical building, and halls for the fra- 
ternal societies, and a large brick used below 
by the Bank of Arizona, and above for territo- 
rial othces and territorial library. Many of 
the stores are large fireproof s, carrying 
very large stocks of goods. The latest im- 
provement is the large and commodious hotel 
"Sherman House," erected by M. H. Sherman, 
a stirring territorial pioneer, and now leased 
by H. M. Hughes, an experienced hotel man, 
who places this before the public as a first-class 
house for tourists and families. Last Sunday 
the dinner tables served nearly 200 guests to a 
very inviting bill of fare. 

But the more emphatic American feature of 
the city is expressed in the fact that three able 
and readable daily newspapers are published 
here, with their accompanying weeklies, and 
on every occasion of important news free extras 
are distributed promptly through the city. 
All of these are endeavoring to encourage and 
sustain the brave pioneers of our new Territory, 
and to let the distant lands know there are here 
rich grazing lands not used, where enterprise 
would easily develop the water for stock; that 
there are in these mountains vast deposits of 
gold, silver, copper and lead that offer ample 
remuneration for capital and labor expended in 
their development. 

Too often the pioneer newspapers are not 
given half the credit due them. 

The Whipple Post is within a mile of the 
city and forms quite a suburban town, adding 
much to the good literary society of the place, 
as well as to the security of the multitude of 
scattered mining camps in this vicinity. The 
officers and their families are highly esteemed. 
The electric light is now to be dispensed to the 
city of Prescott as some of the most energetic 
citizens have a franchise for introducing the 
Brush and Swan lights, The climate of this 



portion of the Territory is very nearly perfec- 
tion itself. Every day has pleasant refreshing 
breezes, and cool bracing temperature at night. 
Mining work can be pursued twelve months 
each year. 

I very much doubt if there is an average of 
any better climate in any State or Territory 
than these mining hills of Arizona. 

Asthmatic Subjects 
Will here find relief. Mr. I. Miller, an old resi- 
dent of Santa Barbara was, on account of asth- 
ma, obliged to leave there, and was induced to 
come to Arizona, and after a few days resi- 
dence in Phoenix (only 1,800 feet elevation) he 
told me he was entirely relieved of his old 
trouble. So he opened up trade in that town. 
Some afflicted one may say: "How can 1 get 
there, or to the higher town of Prescott ? " The 
Southern Pacific R. K. brings you to Maricopa 
station, either from east or west, and a splen- 
did through line of stages lands you quickly in 
frescott or any intermediate place. This stage 
route shows you Gila and Salt river valleys, 
the grandest valley farms^of Arizona and some 
rich hill scenery, as you pass over 150 miles 
across the Territory. Or the Atlantic & Paci- 
fic R. R., now completed to connect with the 
Southern Pacific in California and Santa Fe R. 
R. at Albuquerque, will bring passengers for 
this place to Ash Fork, and a pleasant stage 
ride of only sixty miles to reach Prescott. 
This route passes near the 

Grandest Scenery of this Continent, 
And ample provisions are making for tourists 
to enjoy these sights with safety and with very 
trifling additional expense. The students of 
geology will find in these deep gorges of the 
Colorado, the largest illustrated work on strat- 
ification and the crust formations of the earth. 
The student of astronomy, from these deep 
gorges can study the visible starry firmament 
at mid-day. 

When the Colorado River R. R. bridge is 
completed, this road will be an important 
thoroughfare. Northern and middle Arizona 
property will be tripled and quadrupled 
quickly in value. This section has already 
caught the inspiration of success, and capital is 
flowing this way, and developement is fast 
supplementing the efforts of the brave and self- 
denying prospectors. Capitol is building roads, 
and erecting mills, and lead and copper 
smelters, and the teams that bring in merchan- 
dise and coke are freighting bullion for back 
loading to the railroad. 

There will be, through the assistance of com- 
peting railroads, a greater advancement hi this 
section of Arizona within the next two years 
than was made in the ten previous years. 

Capitalists are now using the best practical 
experts as explorers, and investing freely on 
their reports after thorough tests and examina- 
tions of properties. 

The Great Opportunity to Invest 
In large mining properties at present reason- 
able figures, from the very nature of the case 
cannot long exist, especially to find properties 
in midst of well organized and thoroughly pro- 
tected society and under our own laws. There 
are now scattered over this belt of rich mineral 
deposits some few groups of mines, that some 
single ledge of the group, would be ample for 
an extensive plant, that would pay millions in 
dividends. To illustrate: The Howell Co. own a 
group of mines that were bought by Partridge 
Brothers for §35,000 of the locaters, and for 
good measure or as "pelon" the Belle Mine was 
thrown in. This Company developed the 
property at an expense of a few thousands and 
sold to the Howell Co. for §75,000; a very 
handsome advance on cost, but in the estima- 
tion of an expert, was no appreciable fraction 
of the real value of this one ledge that was then 
so slightly esteemed, and is now proved to be 
ample to run the largest reduction works in the 
Territory. 

I speak of the situation as I see it, after 
spending over twenty years in mines, and am 
free to say I own not even the fraction of any 
mine or real estate in the Territory. 

It seems very certain that properties most 
eligible and convenient for working with profit 
will soon be taken up by those able to hold 
them, as safe and permanent investments. 
There are many gold, silver and copper mines 
located and being developed within a radius of 
twenty-five miles of Prescott. 

The Black Hills district excites the astonish- 
ment of those who visit it, and Turkey Creek 
district rejoices in rich horn silver that will 
assay over twenty thousand dollars to the ton, 
and promising well for continuance as they sink 
clown on a lead of two feet, with strata of this 
character of free milling ore. But of this I 
will say more after visiting the claims, and will 
now notice something I have seen. 

The Bonanza Copper Mines of Arizona, 

The Copper Basin mines arc located ten 
miles west of Prescott. This property, be- 
longing to Copper Basin Copper Company, of 
which Colonel C. C. Bean, of Prescott, is Presi- 
dent, and J. B. Tappan, Secretary, is composed 
of more than twenty distinct locations made in 
strict accordance with requirements of United 
States mining laws ; each claim with not less 
than §500 worth of prospect work and all other 
requirements complied with, and the proper ap- 
X>lications made for United States mining pat- 
ents, which will issue for same in a short time. 

These claims, with the water rights and 
requisite grounds for reduction works, covers 
an area of about 440 acres in the basin, thus 
precluding any possible collision with any other 
title or claim to title. 



This property is now reached from Pres- 
cott by the old military road which passes 
directly through the basin to Fort Yuma. 
From the basin to A. & P. R. R. it is a direct 
natural, and most of the way a valley road and 
only fifty miles to Ash Fork depot. 

The basin is located in granite and soft gran- 
ite, quartzite and sandy conglomerate rocks. 
The higher rim rocks are of a more solid granite 
and porphyry. The basin is four or five miles 
long by one to three miles in its irregular widths. 
The bottom of the basin is very rough and 
broken up by ravines, hills and small mineral 
mountains, steep and precipitous, the bare rocks 
in many places showing the rich copper stains 
when a great distance from them. From a tun- 
nel started in where was an old Indian cave with 
some bones and relics found, they find native 
soluble bluestone or sulphate of copper in large 
masses, and some of the bones were coppered 
over. 

We found the soil heavily impregnated with 
copper salts, oxides and decrystalized or anhy- 
drous sulphates almost everywhere, but in some 
places to a high working per cent, as proved by 
tests made by Prof. Treadwell and others. The 
various classes of different carbonate oxides and 
chloride ores are here in abundance, with fre- 
quent showing of native copper, but that which 
astonishes the visitor most is the sand conglom- 
erate of richest green and blue hues assaying in 
copper to the. high average of fourteen 
per cent, and sometimes showing native 
copper in nuggets and in connection with 
the red oxides. This ore is so very 
abundant that it would be much harder to tell 
where it is not than where it is. The banks of 
the creek bed have it in heavy mass._ You 
ascend the hank and strike the pick in the 
ground and pry out a piece of soft rock, and 
you have this same sandy conglomerate. Tons 
of rich broken pieces and some nuggets of 
native copper have been sacked and piled up 
near the camp, and on other portions of the 
ground experienced judges of ores become en- 
tirely bewildered in attemping to estimate the 
value or number of tons of pay ore now above 
the surface and in the surface soil, and they 
dare not put it at less than 1,000,000 tons. 

Prof. Geo. A. Treadwell, an expert in copper, 
assaying and metallurgy, spent some days ex- 
amining and assaying from all varieties of the 
ore, and from eighty samples assayed, he got an 
average of sixteen per cent copper. From the 
bottom of a shaft twelve feet deep, sunk in 
bottom of the ravine for testing the water- 
flow — which is abundant in all the ravines- 
some heavy sulphuret ore was taken out, 
samples of which assayed §10 gold and §15 
silver to the ton, and 24A per cent copper. 
Up on the side of one of the hills, in the basin, 
a shaft forty-two feet deep showed a well de- 
fined ledge of rich ore, with regular increase of 
size and quality as the depth was increased. 

A number of very interesting points and 
proofs of the ubiquity of the pay ore, both in 
and on the ground, would all simply go to en- 
large the assurance that this is a copper prop- 
erty, destined in the near future to rival, if not 
equal the best that Lake Superior ever saw. 

A visitor with me, representing the Chicago 
Furnace Manufacturing Co. of Fraser & 
Chalmers, a man quite familiar with copper 
mines, thought the "Calumet," and possibly 
one other Lake Superior mine could now show 
a greater property than this copper basin. If 
with only small prospect labor and that on 
more than 

Twenty Different Claims 

This will bear any comparison with one so fully 
developed, it is the highest commendation. 
The forests of excellent pine timber, for lumber, 
that abounds within three miles, the pines and 
junipers and some hard woods are near and 
abundant for charcoal. Coke can be delivered 
direct from the railroad to the basin, when 
teams will have freight both ways at about §25 
to §27 per ton. But when the branch railroad 
from Ash Fork to Prescott is built there will be 
a large margin for profits saved from the ex- 
penses of present running. 

So with all the naughtiness of the railroads 
in getting rich too fast, they are now a great 
convenience, and are 

Opening Up the Mines 
And actually placing the bullion markets and 
sources of supplies at very convenient distances. 
The distant invalid capitalist can conveniently 
visit his Arizona mines, his stock ranch or his 
valley, grain and fruit lands without enduring 
any severe trials of journey or suffocating heat, 
or fear murderous Indians. The miner can con- 
veniently work within or without his mine all 
the vear in this climate. No severe extremes 
of heat or cold. A short rainy season in June 
and July comes as a refreshment to all. I did 
not attempt to detail the multiplied evidences 
of thorough, well defined and encased ledges 
here opened on the various claims, for they are 
too many to particularize, and each seems to 
carry proof of being in itself a large, reliable 
high grade copper mine. Over §17,000 has been 
expended in the prospect work and patent ex- 
penses on this property. 

This property has attracted the attention of 
many distinguished visitors, and after they have 
clambered up to the tops of the highest buttes in 
the basin, and there find the rich copper veins 
traced from the base up, and everywhere on the 
flats find the soil full of it, they seem lost to ex- 
press the possibilities of such a mining property 
if provided with the best facilities for reduc- 
tion. One visitor, and extensive observer of 
mines, pronounced this "the largest and most 



important mining estate in Arizona, and possi- 
bly in the United States. " 

Last December George A. Treadwell, repre- 
senting an English syndicate, bonded this prop- 
erty for the sum of §3,500,000, which bond ex- 
pires with July 1,1 SS3. Mr. Treadwell, generally 
recognized as a very safe mining engineer and 
expert in mines, very carefully examined this 
property, and, after days of testing, admitted, 
at least, §7,000,000 worth of ore in and above 
the surface soil. 

It is possible that the routine work of the 
Land Patent Office will not be completed and 
papers transferred by July 1st, and this may in- 
terfere with the transferring of the property on 
time as specified in the bonds now on record 
here. Even should this negotiation entirely 
fall through, other capital will soon take hold 
of such a property. 

Col. Bean and family will start for New York 
in a few days, carrying with them the high es- 
teem of all their acquaintances here. 

B. W. Ckowkll. 

Prescott, A. T., June 20, 1883. 



Natural Resources. 



That small portion of our county which has 
been partially prospected for auriferous quartz, 
has not only proven rich, but has natural re- 
sources for the working of its ores which are 
seldom mentioned by the prospector. t)ur 
mountains are covered with the tall white pine, 
the tough spruce, the golden tamarac, and the 
hardy oak, all of which can be had in abundance 
for the erection of mills, the timbering of tun- 
nels, and the thousand and one uses to which 
timber can be applied in the workings of a 
mine. Every mountain gorge pours down its 
silvery torrent, and the clear waters are to the 
mill man the motive power wherewith to drive 
his mill. Our quartz lodes, owing to the moun- 
tainous character of the county, arc easily 
worked, there being invariably gulches or can- 
yons from which tunnels can be driven which 
will open and drain the veins hundreds of feet 
below the surface. Why then do not our pros- 
pectors reflect for a moment on the advantages 
thus bountifully given by a lavish Nature? In 
all of the flat or rolling country, w r here quartz 
mining is pursued, every mine, in order to be 
extensively and successfully worked, must first 
have its steam engine with which to run a mill, 
pump the surplus water from a mine, and hoist 
from its levels the pay ore and the tons of 
waste dirt and rock for which there is not 
room in the galleries below. After descending 
a few hundred feet the machinery required for 
this purpose is of such ponderous dimensions 
that its cost is a fortune, and before the mine 
is fairly opened its owners are at an expense of 
thousands of dollars. Here in the mountains 
everything is changed in that respect, and with 
only a nominal capital the miner can open his 
mine and crush the rock taken from it, -at a 
vast deduction from the expense in less favored 
localities. In Montana and Idaho the amateur 
miner from the East, we are told, looking for a 
pretty location, used to erect his quartz mill 
out in the level plain on the banks of some 
grand river, and transport the ore from his 
mine— sometimes 30 miles distant. This kind 
of kid-glove mining may be very romantic, but 
does it pay? Our miners may wish to find 
suitable spots upon which to erect their mills, 
but we think none of them would ever go down 
to the valley of the Sacramento to locate a 
millsite, and haul their quartz from this local- 
ity, to be crushed in a mill in operation there. 
No, we have millsites at our door yards, and 
water to drive our mills with, and timber for 
our buildings, and what is better than all, we 
have veins of metalliferous ore extending through 
our county too vast for imagination. Where 
we have all these natural advantages will not 
this section of the country, by the appliance 
of a little enterprise and energy, again produce 
wealth as in its palmiest days? — Sierra 
Tribune. 



The Outside. — Louis Betz, who left here 
some six weeks ago to hunt for a new locality 
to locate, returned the other day. During his 
absence he took a trip over the Denver and Rio 
Grande Railroad, and visited a number of the 
mining towns of southwest Colorado, and, with 
the exception of Gunnison city, he saw none 
that showed the least signs of stability. At 
this place there are iron mines, and wealthy 
companies are erecting large iron and steel 
works. Silverton he reports as being nothing 
but a hurrah whisky-drinking railroad town, 
overrun with thieves and cut-throats. It lias 
no foundation whatever that he could see on 
which to build. At Ouray they are working 
20 men in one mine, and these are all the men 
working. There are no reduction works at 
Ouray, and what little ore extracted shipped to 
Pueblo for reduction. The people of Ouray 
are living on the expectations of a boom visiting 
them this summer. He also visited the "Red 
Hills," about which there are such great tales 
in regard to the richness of the mines floating 
through the country. While there he saw no 
mines. There were from three to six feet of 
snow on the ground. The mining locations are 
made on top of the snow, the stakes driven in 
the snow, and no person knows what is beneath 
the snow. It is the opinion of many who visited 
the Red Hills that when the snow melts away 
so will the rich mines,- Piocht Itecord, 



July 14, 18S3.J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



i 



H]EGHy\Nic^L Progress. 



A Portable Ingot Regenerator. 

Wr gave in inns several months 

■nil description ofl the Gjcr Soaking I 'it, 
by the aid "f which an Ingot of steel may lie 
carried from the converter through the entire 
ol rolling into rails ..r bare without re- 
beating. Thii "soaking pit, 1 however, waj ;i 
\.i\ massive affair, built of brick, and 
aryl beiu^ locate*! directly by the side of the 
converter. 

Quite recently, Mr. Jacob Reeee, of Pitts- 
burg, has patented a portable "soaking pit," or 
appears to possess quite im- 
portant advantages over the Gjer pit. This 
uew device is described as follows by the 
,,/n.iiir- r: 

This regeneratoi is composed of a nest of 
bars, each chambei ; 
suofa size u to admit and envelop an ingot when 
placed in it The walla of these chambers are 
two inches thick, and the whole set of chain- 
uiade in one piece oi Bessemer steel. 
This six 1 ' d "ii :i carriage, and is sur- 
rounded with brick or some otliei - 1 n-m- 

condnotor of heat The regenerator i* provided 
with lids to cover the cells at the top, and with 
openings and doors for closing them at the bot- 
tom ol each cell. When it is required for use, 
rriage containing it is run under a hood 
tticatiug with the furnace, the caps and 
withdrawn, and the hot gases forced 
h the hood down through the cells and 
OoJ oftheir bases, until the regenerator is prop- 
erly heated. It is then withdrawn, the bottom 
doors closed, and the caps placed upon the cells. 
When the ingots are removed from the molds, 
the) are place. I with their small ends down, in 
i di .- II-, and the lids placed over them. When 
enerator is fully charged and' hermeti- 
cally closed, t > exclude the air and retain the 
heat, u is taken to the blooming mill, and 
a second regenerator is run into the convert- 
ing house and employed in the same manner. 
\\ Den the ingots are taken from the mold 
they are only solidified to the depth of about 
one" half an inch, while the center is in a molten 
Vs the outside is too cold and the inside 
is much too hot to be rolled, by placing the 
ingots in a hot regenerator, in the space of 
twenty minutes, more or less, the temperature 
of the ingots is equalized, and they may be 
taken from the regenerator and rolled or ham- 
mered u ithout the use of any reheating or con- 
sumption of fuel, and what is more important, 
without being burned or losing weightdiy oxi- 
dation. 

When an ingot is withdrawn, the lid or cap 
is again put on, and when the regenerator is 
emptied it is run back to the converting house 
and again tilled. When an ingot is placed in 
the regenerator it takes up heat from the walls 
of the cell, and the internal heat passes to the 
outside of the ingot, and thus it becomes of a 
uniform heat, but of too high a temperature for 
rolling. The walls of the cell then absorb heat 
from the ingot, and thus the ingot is permitted 
to pass from the molten to the solid state more 
gradually and more uniformly than by the old 
practice. Mr. Reese claims that the steel walls 
of his cells will give the heat off and take it up 
much more rapidly than any kind of brick, and 
that the regenerator lined with iron or steel 
will last much longer than if lined with brick. 
So that he has a good heat conductor next to 
the ingot, and this is surrounded with a good 
non-conductor of heat. Mr. Reese claims that 
this invention will save labor, fuel, repairs of 
furnaces, sand, and waste of iron to the amount 
of over two dollars per ton. 

A Chance for Inventors.— In the heavy 
thunder storms which occurred in various parts 
of the country last week the lightning mani- 
fested its well known affinity for petroleum. 
Three large oil tanks were struck. One of 
them was near Olcan, in this State, another at 
Muncy Station, Pa., and the third in the yard 
of the Standard Oil Company at Communipaw, 
N. J. This last one had very little oil in it, 
and was not consumed, but the others, with 
their contents, were burning at the latest ac- 
counts. The attractive influence exerted by 
petroleum, or its vapor, which renders these 
great oil tanks so liable to destruction by 
thunderbolts, does not seem to be very well un- 
derstood. If it was, we should hardly be with- 
out any efficient means of guarding such struc- 
tures against lightning. The subject is well 
worthy of attention and study on the part of 
men of science. At present the safeguards are 
so inadequate that an oil tank is not only very 
likely to be destroyed by any thunder storm, 
but to act also as a firebrand to every building 
anywhere near it. The inventor who devises a 

method which shall afford to oil tanks absolute 
protection against lightning, ought to be able, 
to make a million dollars by the invention. — N. 

V. Sun. 

Diffusion Engine. — At a recent meeting of 
the London Physical Society, Mr. Woodward 
described an experiment illustrating motion 
produced by diffusion. A porous reservoir of 
clay containing air was suspended from one end 
of a weighted -balance beam. A glass tube pro- 
jected from it below and dipped into a vessel 
of water. A jet of hydrogen gas was allowed 
to play on the outside of the reservoir, and the 
balance beam began to oscillate. This is an 
adaptation of Graham's well known experiment, 
and is, in fact, a diffusion engine. 



Things to be Kept in Mind by Every 
Mechanic. 

care should be bestowed on the 

hanging and care of shafting. A line of shaft- 
ing should run true and smoothly without 
jumping or jerking. If a line runs true and 
the pulleys do not wobble, ox the boxes exude 
oil, it is a real delight to a good mechanic and 
like "a thing of beauty a joy forever. 

A mill or machine shop should be erected with 

a view to its permanency. The foundations 

should be strong and rigid and the timbers 
sound and well seasoned. Springing and shrink- 
ing timbers and settling walls cannot give the 
■ y support to machinery nor reduce frie- 
to a minimum. 

The reason of unsatisfactory running of shaft- 
ing is not always its location in an improperly 
constructed building. The millwright is often 
at fault in not hanging the shafting properly. 

When the shafting is properly hung and the 
machinery in operation, the line should be in- 
spected every now and then and any defect 
which may appear remedied. 

This is often found necessary with the best 
hung shafting in the best constructed building 
if the economy of power is worth looking after, 
for there are so many disturbing causes affect- 
ing the integrity of a line that it is impossible 
to depend on long continued accuracy unless 
constant attention is given to the condition of 
the shafting. 

A box slightly out of line or level will absorb 
a large amount of oil, and yet be continually 
hot, waste power by unnecessary friction, be- 
sides grinding and cutting the shaft. It will 
always pay to attend closely to such matters. 

In friction gearing no power is wasted by loss 
of friction, the friction itself being the means 
used to transmit the power, and in point of 
economy it exceeds belting or cogs. The driv- 
ing pulleys may be made of well-seasoned wood, 
and the faces can be beveled so as to communi- 
cate power in any direction. 

Where a friction pulley is used, the boxes and 
journals will not heat to any extent, as the pres- 
sure can be made uniform by an idle pulley 
made of wood and placed on the opposite side 
to counteract the pressure. This cannot be 
done with a belt. 



Increased Efficiency of Railways. — Mr. 
Wm. P. Shinn, of New York, and formerly 
Vice President of the Alleghany Valley rail- 
road, has prepared for the report of the Chief 
of the Bureau of Statistics, a statement upon 
the increased efficiency of the railroad system 
of the United States. His paper, which is a 
ery interesting and valuable one, shows that 
on three leading railroads, viz. : the New York 
Central & Hudson River, New York, Lake Erie 
& Western, and the Pennsylvania railroad, the 
traffic increased during the decade ending 1880, 
from 2,682,603,465 ton miles in 1870, to 8,263,- 
038,412 ton miles in 1880, or upwards of 300 
per cent. The means by which this enormous 
increase in traffic has been secured, Mr. Shinn 
attributes to the following causes: First, im- 
proved track or ''permanent way," including 
bridge superstructure. This is largely due to 
the adoption of steel rails. Second, additional 
sidings, and second, third and fourth tracks. 
Third, increased capacity and strict classifica- 
tion of locomotives. Fourth, increased capacity 
of freight cars. Up to 1876 the standard ca- 
pacity of freight cars was 20,000 pounds, in 
1877 a few were built to carry 30,000, and since 
1873 the standard cars, both of the East and 
West, have been built to carry 40,000 pounds. 
Fifth, additional terminal facilities. Sixth, 
improved methods of signaling, embraced 
chiefly in the establishment of the "Block, sys- 
tem." Seventh, running locomotives "first in, 
first out," and running freight trains at a higher 
rate of speed. 



A Mechanical Want. — If the builders of 
machines for specific purposes, says a mechanical 
exchange, would accurately determine the 
power required to drive them, and furnish this 
information to the purchaser, they would not 
only do him a favor, but would render impor- 
tant assistance to the science of engineering 
generally. With this knowledge, the provid- 
ing of the proper power for projected enter- 
prises would be greatly simplified, fewer and 
less costly mistakes would be made, and a bet- 
ter general economy of motive power result. 
As it is, with the exception of a few old and 
prominent industries, the power required to 
drive the different machines, and hence the 
total power required for a contemplated plant 
is, to a great extent, a matter of conjecture, 
so that unless the comparison can be made with 
a similar establishment already in operation, 
the probabilities are entirely against a judicious 
selection in the way of an engine to furnish 
the power. — Aye of Steel. 



The Largest AGRioui/rufeAL Machine Shop. 
— The most extensive agricultural machine 
shops in the world are at Springfield, Ohio. 
There are five in all. A good idea of the im- 
mense size of one workshop may be obtained by 
imagining a building almost 17,000 feet in 
length by sixty feet in width, a continuous 
room three miles and over in length. At each 
minute a completely made machine is rolled 
from the stocks and housed or shipped to its 
destination; 600 machines from sunrise to sun- 
set— an annual production of 100,000 imple- 
ments. — Mechanical Enyineer, 



SeiEJMTIFIG P^OGF^ESS. 



Molecular Vibrations. 

No scientific doctrine is more generally be 
Ueved than that of the conservation offeree. The 
greatstudents of nature almost universally ac- 
cept it. So many old and credited theories have 
been Overturned that advanced thinker- arc 
prepared to see this one share such a fate. This 
is a possibility only: the theory is considered 
eminently a proved and true one. 

Briefly stated it amounts to this: In the uni- 
verse there is uo natural power known to us that 
can create or destroy force. All that man can 
do is to transform it and change the form of its 
manifestations. Whenever force becomes man- 
ifest to us, we can trace it back to anterior 
forms. It never appears spontaneously genera- 
ted, and from no origin. Heat, one form of 
force, can be changed into useful efforts. It is 
assumed to represent an intense vibration of 
the molecules. The minute heat vibrations of 
the molecules, which create impulses infinite in 
number, and, considering the size of the mole- 
cules, of almost infinite force, can be 
lengthened, and made to coalesce into 
a single prolonged effort. A cubic 
inch of water may be heated, by the combustion 
of carbon, until the repulsive force among its 
vibrating molecules has developed, and the paths 
of vibration have been increased to twelve times 
their former length. Thus steam is produced. 
The steam may be admitted into a cylinder, tin- 
ier a close-fitting piston, which it will raise un- 
til the space under the piston is of one cubic foot 
volume. If the steam is allowed to condense, 
the piston will return. The minute vibrations 
of the molecules, too small to be measured, or 
fully conceived of, have been joined together so 
as to produce a single wave of a foot front, it 
may be, and of a foot altitude. The first phase 
of an oscillation is represented in the rise of the 
piston; its descent represents the second. The 
motion of the piston only renders the expansion 
of the water into steam visible in its effects. 
The true transformation of power was anterior 
to all this. The proximate origin of the force 
was the combustion of the fuel. 

The chemical affinity of carbon for oxygen 
was called upon. These two elements were 
made to unite. They rushed together with very 
great yet measured velocity. As molecule of 
carbon came against molecule of oxygen, it was 
split up into atoms, and immediately combined 
with the oxygen. Under the effects of the 
atomic concussion, the newly formed molecule 
of carbon dioxide started into vibration. The 
vibration was one of that character which af- 
fects our nerves with the sensation called heat. 
The myriad of vibrations was imparted to tht 
cubic inch of water, and a measure of their 
amount arrived at. It came to some 2,000-foot 
pounds. 

This, it must be remembered, is theory, and 
unproved except by analogy. The resemblance 
between the phenomena of sound and heat is 
very great. Both can be reflected and refracted; 
both can start from a center and be radiated 
through space, in accordance with identical 
laws Sound is unquestionably due to vibra- 
tions. They can be seen by the unassisted eye. 
Such are the vibrations of a long string or tun- 
ing fork. From the analogies between the phe- 
nomena of sound and heat, the conclusion is 
drawn that heat is also due to vibrations. 

We reach thus a true conception of the theory. 
Heat vibrations are invisible. They have been 
invented by scientists to explain exisiting phe- 
nomena. The proof of their existence is an 
analogical one only; and analogy has so often 
failed that the whole theory is provisional. 
The probability of the existence of the vibra- 
tions is founded on their capability to explain 
known facts. As soon as a discordance is 
shown they must be abandoned by the theorizer. 
As soon as such discordance between their ex- 
istence and the phenomena of nature is shown, 
the proof and probability of their existence 
vanishes. 

The weakness of any attempt to seek among 
molecular vibrations for a new source of force 
is thus very evident. They serve only to illus- 
trate the possibility of the mutual transforma- 
tion of different kinds of force. They are not 
absolutely known to exist, and may at any time 
be discredited, and a new theory be adopted. 
To take such an unproved and unknown quan- 
tity as a reservoir of new and hitherto undis- 
covered power is going beyond the bounds of 
analogy or probability. — Cor. Scientific A»>< W- 



Filterini; Distilled Watek. — Eiselt rec- 
ommends the use of sponge for filtering distilled 
water. The filtration goes on with great ra- 
pidity, and the product is clear as crystal. 
When filtered through paper, distilled water 
soon exhibits a felty sediment, which is never 
formed when filtered through sponge, so that 
the bottles scarcely need cleaning after several 
months' use. The apparatus that he employs 
consists of a bottle with an opening near the 
bottom from which descends a bent glass tube. 
This tube is about 6 inches long and 1 or li 
inches in diameter; at each end is a perforated 
rubber stopper bearing a narrower glass tube. 
The wide tube contains one or two long strips 
of fine sponge that has been cleaned with di- 
lute hydrochloric acid and then dried. The 
bottle to which this filter is attached must not 
be larger than the one placed beneath to catch 
the filtrate. The sponge, of course, must be 
cleaned every few months, 



Conversion oi \m.m e into Stars. — Too 
whole range ol astronomy presen 
turns which have attracted m u attention than 

abrated nebular hypoth< 3 oi Hersche! 

and of Laplace. We shall first en :iate these 

speculations, and then we shall attempt to in- 
dicate how far they seem to be warranl 

tuai state of scientific bnowledc 
one of his most memorable papers, sir William 
Herschel presents us with a summary of lii- 
observations on the nebula*, arranged in such a 
manner as to suggest his tin radual 

transmutation of nebula- into stars, He firs! 
shows us that there are regions in the heaven 
where a Eaint di Mused nebulosity is all that can 
be detected by the telescope, Tl 
nebulae in which a nucleus can be just dis- 
cerned; others again in which the un- 
easily seen ; and still others whore the nuclcu 
is a brilliant, .star-like point. The transition 
from an object of this kind to a nebulous Btui 
is very natural, while the nebulous stars pat 
into the ordinary stars by a few graduated 
Btages. It is thus possible to enumerate u 
series of objects, beginning at one end with 
the most diffused nebulosrl g at the 

other with an ordinary lixed star or croup of 
stars. Each object in the series diners bu( 
slightly from the object just before it and just 
after it. It seemed to Mersilu I that he waf 
thus able to view the art i ml changes by wliich 
musses of phosphorescent or -low in i- vapor 
became actually condensed down into stars. — 
Popular Scienc* MontMy. 

Liquid (tasks ind Spain Aw;ohol.— M. 
Cailetet, a French chemist, a e time ago suc- 
ceeded, by liquefying ethyline and causing it to 
boil," in producing a temperature of— 105 C. 

( — 157° F. ), at which he liquefied a few gases 
Under strong pressure, and even caused oxygen 
to approach the liquid state. Mr. Wroblewski, 
>\\ , one of his pupils, continuing the ex- 
periments, has, by boiling liquid ethyline in a 
vacuum, produced a temperature of— 13G C, 
(212.8* V.), at which sulphuret of carbon and 
alcohol were congealed, and oxygen and nitro- 
gen became liquid. The changes in the form ol 
oxygen were obtained on the 9th of April in 
three experiments, in which the conditions of 
pressure ('2'2!> to '2C\ atmospheres! and tempera- 
ture were slightly, but not essentially, varied, 
.Liquid oxygen is transparent and colorless, 'lii- 
fering in this from ozone, which is deep blue. 
Liquid nitrogen has * similar appearance. Sul- 
phuret of carbon is a white solid at — I I <> C., but 
becomes liquid when raised to- 1 10 C. At - 
130° alcohol assumes the form of a white 
solid, which becomes viscous at- 129 . Car- 
bonic oxide was liquefied under similar condi- 
tions with nitrogen. 

Scintillations of Stars as Akkkvtkd iiy 

the Aurora Bureaus. -According to /■ 
Comptes Jianfttx, M. Ch. Montigny, observing 
for many years at Brussels, has noticed, as pre- 
vious observers have done, that the scintillation 
of stars is much increased during the occur- 
rence of an aurora. He has noticed, further, 
that every aurora "produces immediately its 
effects upon the scintillation;" that stars in tin- 
north are most affected, and tfiat the influence 
of the phenomenon is most marked for the 
stars which are observed across the upper 
regions of the air. Magnetic disturbance also, 
even when accompanied by no aurora visible at 
Brussels, increase the scintillation to a marked 
extent. On two occasions during July, 1881, 
the effect of magnetic disturbances was observed 
with no aurora visible in Brussels, or even, so 
far as can be learned, in any part of Denmark. 

Transmission of Sound Through Hock. 
Herr F. Schell, of Grund, recently described 
some observations made a short time since, in 
the course of mining work in the Hart/, mount- 
ains, on the distance through which sounds are 
transmitted in rock. In a horizontal direction 
the firing of shots at the face of a crosscut has 
been heard in a crosscut driven toward it, the 
face of which was 447 feet distant from it. A 
level was driven on a vein at a depth of 538 feet 
below the surface, and happened to strike 187 
feet distant in a horizontal direction below a 
stamp mill dropping stamps, weighing 330 
pounds. The dropping of the stamps on the 
surface could be distinctly heard in the heading 
below, which, in a direct line, the hypothenuse 
of a right-angled triangle, was separated by 571 
feet of rock. 



The Electro-Motive Force of Batteries, 
— Recent experiments by Mr. W. H. I 'reeee. 
communicated to the Royal Society, Great 
Britain, show that changes of temperature do 
not practically affect the electro-motive force of 
a battery, but they do materially affect the in- 
ternal resistance. Faraday's observation, that 
the improved current from a heated cell is due 
to increased conductivity, is thus confirmed. 
Mr. Precce's results also show that of the vari- 
ous forms of batteries in practical use, the Dan- 
iell is most seriously influenced by variations in 
temperature, and that in all experiments with 
that battery, either the temperature must be 
kept constant or frequent measurements should 
be taken of the internal resistance of the bat- 
tery and allowance made for the variation. 

Phosphorescence in Animals. — According 
to Radziszewsky, the luminous animals, like 
Pelagia uoclUttca, Beroe ovatw, etc., owe this 
fact to a peculiar fat that they contain. These 
little animals do not give light when at rest, but 
when stimulated give a quick Mash of mono- 
chromatic light resembling lightning. 



20 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 14, 1883 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 



L'u.\ini,i;Li KVfiiiY Thursday from Advurtishmenw in Mining and Scientific Pkbbs and other s. F. JoimsALS. 



ASSESSMENTS-STOCKS ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS. 



Coat PAN Y. 
Alta S M Co. 



ami Prize M < 

ulu& Curry n 
!<■ & NorcrosE 



Martin Whitu M Co... 

Mt Anliuni M Co 

Reil Hill KM Co 

Till Top M Co 

Wales Coo ("i Si S MCc 



LOCATION: No; 

Nevada. .2(j. 

Nevada. .22., 

Nevada. .16. 

Nevada, .10, . 

— Nevada... S. 

Nevada.. 39, 

. California. . 1., 
Nevada.. 19. 

Nevada. . 4 



,Ne 



ida 



.14. 



..39. 
..15. 



..Arizc.ua.. B. 
. .Nevada. , 1. 



Amt. Levi 
25.. July 
35.. June 
25... J ime 
10.. May 
21). ..Time 
20... Tune 

5,00. .June 
20.. June 

1.00,. May 
25 , , June 
50.. June 
50, .June 
30.. May 
10.. July 
25., July 
20.. May 
05 . . May 
25. May 
25.. May 



ED. Delinq' 
3.. Aug 7. 

27.. Aug 2. 
21,. July 24. 
26. .July 2.. 
26.. Aug 4. 
15,. July 19. 

5. .July 9. 
14.. July 19. 
21 June 21.. 
25.. July 27. 
15.. July 20. 

7. .July 11. 
25.. June 28, 

9.. Aug 13. 



xt. Sale. 



Seurkxahy. 



i'E of Business. 



..Aug 27. .Win. H. Watson 302 Montgomery st 

...Aug 22.. B Burris 309 Montgomery at 



E M Hall,. 

..July 19. ,WH Watson 

..Sept 3..CP Gordon 

. . Aug 9. .R Wegener 

..July 26. .W. Cunningham.., 
Aug 9. .OB EJiiott., 



.327 Finest 
..302 Montgomery st 
, 309 Montgomery st 
. . , .414 California fit 

,.326 Montgomery st 
Pine st 



July 11. 

25.. June 27 
24.. June 26. 
29.. July 6 
14., .Tune 15 



.July 16. .P Jacobus 309 Montgomery st 

..Aug 20.. KM Hall 327 Pine st 

. .Aug 13. . A K Durbvow 309 Montgomery st 

..Aug 2..SF Lightner 309 Montgomery st 

, . July 23. .J W Pew 310 Pine st 

.Sept 3. .ft E Kelly 419 California at 

..Aug 8.. J J Scoville 309 Montgomery st 

..July 16..J H Willcins 438 California st 

, .July 23 E Hestres 328 Montgomery st 

Aug 6..H Deas 309 Montgomery st 

.Tidy 16. J H Apjilegate 320 Sansome st 



OTHER COMPANIES-NOT ON THE LIoTd OF THE BOARDS. 



Ei 



M I 



■ M ( 



Goodiiuaw M Ct 

Gorilla M Co 

Hamburg M Co 

II .'..ml-bouml M 

Li 



i M t 
! V & Re 



• . . • Nevada. . 2.. 
. .( 'alii'oruia.. 2, . 
. .California.. 2., 
. California.. 1.. . 
, .l_'alifornia..l2. . 
. .California. 2, . 

.< lalifornia. . 1. . 

.California, .14.. 
. .California, . 1.. 

Nevada.. 8.. 

..California.. 1. . 
. . . .Arizona. . 6. . 



Roma Union M Co. . . , . 

San Miguel Coo M Co. , 
Yaqni M Co 



'alifornia. . 1. . 
.Nevada. . 2. . 
. .Mexico.. 2.. 
..Mexico.. 1.. 



1.00. .June 20. 

4.00. ...Tune 7. 

3. .June 26. 

05.. May 26. 

10.. June 4. 

05.. June 12. 

40.. June 20. 

10.. June 6. 

10.. June 1 

25.. May 24. 

05 .May 29, 

05. .June 11 

50,. May 28. 

25.. June 20, 

02. .June 18 
1.00.. Apr 28, 

30.. May 24. 



.Aug 6.. 
.July 9. 

July 27., 

July 5.. 

July 7.. 

July 7.. 

July 30., 
.July 14.. 
.July 7., 
.July 2 . 
.July 10., 
.July IS.. 
, June 29.. 

July 25.. 

Aug 6.. 
.June 4., 

June 28.. 



■ Aug 27. 
.July 28. 
.Aug 30. 
.July 24. 
.July 28. 
.Aug 3. 
.Aug 22. 
-Aug 4. 

Aug 1 . 
.July 24. 
.July 28. 
. Aug 6 , 

July 20. 
.Aug 15. 
.Aug 27. 
.July 22. 
.July 18. 



.1 K Warren 307 Montgomery st 

A Judson. 320 SaiiHoiue st 

L Sbannauan 125 First at 

.W 13 Greene 309 Montgomery st 

.P Wetzel 522 Montgomery st 

. H Kunz 209 Sansome st 

.J Stedtfeld 419 California st 

,C C Harvey 309 Montgomery st 

.A A Enquist 436 Montgomery st 

,D A Jennings 401 1 'alifornia st 

. A lit iwie 314 Montgomery st 

,K 1> Hopkins, 436 Montgomery st 

.C L Tilden 806 Market st 

.J W Beviliug 413 California st 

,F. X. Sinioti 518 Sansome st 

. C G Brooks 210 Front st 

,TT Atkinson 337 Pine st 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Savage M < lo 

Union Con S M Co 



Name of Company;, 

IolIw.t Con M Co 

Contention Con M Co... 

Keutuck M Co 

Navajo M Co 

■ M & M ( 



Location. Secretary. Office in S. F. 

Nevada. .E B Holmes 309 Montgomery st. , . . 

Nevada. . J M Burtingtou 309 Montgomery st. . . . 

LATEST DIVIDENDS-WITHIN THREE MONTHS. 



: M I 



Star 



i M l 



Location. Secretaky, 

California.. W Willis 

Arizona, . D C Bates 

Nevada. .J W Pew 

Nevada.. J W Pew 

Nevada. .Win Willis... 

Arizona.. J Nash 

.... California.. Wm Willis.,.. 



Office in S. f. 

... .309 Montgomery st 

309 Montgomery st 

310 Pinest.... 

310 Pinest.... 

....309 Montgomery St.... 

315 California st 

.,..309 Montgomery St.... 



Meeting. 


Date. 


..Annual 


July 19 


, .Annual 


July 16 


AMOUNT. 


Payable. 


... 05 


\pr12 


.... 25 


Apr 28 


... 10 


Iu.k-20 


. . 25 ... . 


May 11 


-.. 50 


Apr 16 


. . , *J;i 


June In 


... 25 


Fune 12 



Table of Highest and Lowest Sales in 
S. P. Stock Exchange. 



Mliha 

Alta 

Ancles 

Allrion 

Argeuta 

Atlas 

K.'k'h.T 

Belctihg 

Best S Helclier, 

Bullinn 

Keolitel 

Hslle Isle 

ttortic 
Rrmtn 



Week 

Em. IN.; 
June 20. 



Week Week , Week 
Ending Ending Ending 
June 27. July 5. i July 12. 



2. IK) 2,751.75 2.00 

60 .701 .45 

60 .75 .55 

.35 .65 

20 .30 .15 



1.35 1.751.10 1 ! 
,i!65 ( : .i 



Hi 1. 1 
dulciui 

< 6ilir.it' 



Ol. 



!>;.)■... 
Hike i 'i 
Kurelni 
Eureka 



1.60 5.25 

1.05 1.25 

'Mo "50 

l.on 1.05 

.5 .10 



Kxi 

Grand Prim.,, 

< 6,111,1 ,V Curi-v 
Hale & \iuvni 

Holmes 

Intleuciulence. 

.Tiilin 

Justice 

JaekHdti 

Kentuck 

Mnrtin Wliit.i.. 

Mm 

Mexican 

Mt. Dialilo.... 
Mt. mtosi.... 
Xim, 



. .Ill 

'3.211 
.2.50 

■]".55 

. 1 I" 

: :8s 

.3.111 



.,2.70 

. OS 



.3 10 4.15 
. 3 00 3.25 



Norths) 



Ei 



Nortli Nil 
Naynjo... . 

N6.nl lie 

i iccicluiltal., 
iil.l.ir. ... 

(In. ''' 



Seg. Bulclier ... 
Sierra Novuiln 

Silver Hill 

Silver Kiue 

Scorpion 

Tuscarora . 

Union < 'i.ii 

Utah 

Wanl 

Wall 

V..II..U ,l :l ,.|„.t... 



0.50 

: i'.si 



... 1.801.50 i .... 

.40 .451 .75 1.00 

.45 .50 .45 ,50 

... .45! .-Ill .50 

in .15 .05 .10 

'.'.'■ i.ioi'is 1:25 



4.05 4.204.25 1.15 



.60 
1.115 

.1: 



.25 



.50'. 
.110 



2.00 



... .10 

,30 ... . 

3.011 3. 853. 30 

2.402.10 2J52.05 

ii.i .10'.... '.10 .... 

45 .55| 45 ,40 

25 1.45.1.25 1.301 lo 

00 .851 .50 

20 .25,. . 

00 8.004.10 

25 .701.... 
20 .30.,.. 
05 .26 .05 
50 2.S02 ■:.. 

26 7.000.00 



5.06 1.75 
.601.,.. 
.25 .20 
.10.... 
2.45 2.40 
7.001 5{ 



.35 1.05. 
.10 .15. 



2.80 3.115 2 III! 
3.6(1 3.25.... 



6.611 2.60 6.15 
.... 4.50 6.00 



6.50 



2 65 6 , 26 

. .... 2.00,1.05 
.2 70 3.162.25 
,| .40 .60 .35 

!,Oo illiliK25 

90 ... 

.2.40 2.70.1.90 

: 615 ci;"|3J61 
10.... 

111:10 

. .76 .85 .60 

Wm 7j" us 

. 2.70 3.75 2 III 

: ".& ":w"'.'. 

.4.25 4. 756. .'.'I 



6; 16 6.75J 6i 7.00 
66: 90 . 20 2 .0 i 20 



.50 . 



.30 



1 90 ... 1.251... 
2.60 2.25 2.55 2.40 2.65 
.16 30 . . .40 

i: II' 1 .'26. i . I.I 1 15 1.56 

■SO I 60 

2,301.1.15 2.101.05 2.05 

3.00 

4.503,55 3.803.90 4.15 

.05 , 

1011 ' 108.50 9.75 

.70 1,0 76 



5£ 4.40 4.804.90 

1.110 2.75 2.. -.0 2.65 



I 153.65 31903.75 4.05 



Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Tin 

100 . 



I"" r. .v Uelchor, 



200 Crown Point.. 



i Ull IV Illl 

I Knrcka Tunnel. 

Gould .ic Uurry.. 

Hale* N.ir 

1 Kentuck 

i Laily Wash 

* Mexican 

i Ml Diabl 

1 Northern Belle. 

' N. Belle Is 

1 "|i6ir 



.lull 12. | ^ 



...Ilk 

.3.10 



1110 
100 



iNe 



Utah 

Union 

Yellow Jacket 

, I TKUNOON SESSION. 

Alta 65i mt 

Aiides 55u 



... 6 
..30c 

2.60 

1 55 

3.051H2.10 
1. 61 11" -1 35 
2 90 

.!.:| 15 



I 1 ) Confidence..., 


2.40 


m \u A >' '( ]n ' 


1.10 


;■■: ivji.iiki 


■:■ ; ■ 


580 c .> mlil & Gurry, 


. Illurj. [-, 




05c 


loo Sale .v Nor 




200 Independence 




100 Mexican 




70 Mt. Diablo,. 




390 Navajo 


,.3@3.0B 


In Northern Belle, 




140 <>))bir 


" 55 


1.75 Eotofri 




Hio Silver King,... 


:::;::. s^ 


300 Savage 


2.05 


T85 Sierra Nevada . 




loo Scorpion 


. . t>w" 70c 


tiaO Union Con 


5i 


iso rjt&u 


. ...2.80 


35 S allow Jacket, 


.,5,9$@i 



PAUPKR Irisii immigrants are coming into the 
nili'il States by way of Canada. 



Mining Share Market. 

Wobbling to the extent of one or two short bits 
per share, the stock market during the Meek has held 
the even tenor of its way. Mow or by what process 
life is kept in an institution so nearly inanimate, it is 
hard to divine. But, we suppose i; is, as the poet 
tells us, because "hope springs eternal in the human 
breast" anil because there are those, as lludibras 
says, "who think the pleasure is as greal in being 
cheated as in cheat;" and so between the sanguine 
anil the simple, enough sustenance is contributed lo 
keep the wheels of this juggernaut moving. Touch- 
ing the condition of the market and the subtle ways 
of the stock angler, Uic Daily Report of |ulv I2th, 
holds : the follpwing pertinent language: "With the 
exception of Alta, which is apparently being manip- 
ulated for ,i deal, the market was quiet after the ad- 
journment ul" the Board yesterday afternoon, and Mill 
not look as promising as earlier in the day. A 
column might be written daily on the variations in 
prices, the gossip, of the street anil the hopes and 
the fears of speculators, and some of our contempo- 
raries il" publish that amount of so-called slock mat- 
ter, hut while operations are so li»lu in die market 
and real facts arc not obtainable, it is .1 fraud on the 
public to publish elaborate stock articles. Several re- 
cent movements in llie market have been made with 
the assistance of mercenary newspapers, ami in each 
case ih" people, the luckless outsiders, have been 
fleeced, The manipulation of Union Con., for in- 
stance, lias been conducted with the aid of one or 
more newspapers, as every obseh ing operator on the 
snvei w,ll knuws. Wegive the news as it. conies, 
state the faits as they are, ami are not controlled by 
bulls or bears." 



Bullion Shipments. 

Mt. Diablo, June 38th, $9,429.; Contention, |ul\ 
.slh. $17,600 ; Ramshorn, 51I1, $15,148 ; Tintic. 51I1 
$10,594 ; Turrill, 5th, $2,261, ; Ontario, 5th, $4,333 
Horn Silver, 5th, $9,000; Ontario, 6th, $S,iS0 
Morn Silver, 6th, $12,000. 



Oakland Bah Factors ^The Oakland Times 
says that the promised revival of the jute mill 
in East Oakland is under way. The work of 
cleaning up the looms, of which there are 122, 
besides other branches of machinery, was com- 
menced last Monday. In addition to this, a 
new brick building, one story high, with a 
frontage of eighty-rive feet on Kast Eleventh 
street, and a depth of sixty feet, to be used as 
a store-house, will lie cominenced this week. 
A large frame addition will be made to the east 
wing of the main building for the reception of 
new machinery from the East and N n Fran- 
cisco, amounting to about S3, 00(1, with the ad- 
dition of a new patent sewing machine of Mr. 
Ki.hlev, of Oakland. The boilers are to receive 
an overhauling, a new smokestack, and the ad- 
dition of a brick wall. The amount of money 
to be expended in improvements will reach sev- 
eral thousands of dollars. A new system is to 
be inaugurated in the mills, under the efficient 
management of Superintendent John Robertson, 
formerly superintendent of the jute mills at San 
Qucntiu. Mr. Robertson offers employment to 
boys and girls from the ages of ten years and up- 
wards; and favorable chances will be given them 
to make good wages. Chinese are not wanted, 
but it is probable that only a few will be em- 
ployed to do certain grades of work. 



II]lJ\l|j\JG ^UJVtJViyXF^Y, 



The following is mostly condensed from journals pub- 
lished in the interior, in proximity to the mines mentioned. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Amador. 
CuNSOLiuATKD. — Dispatch, July j: The l'ly- 
mouth, Empire and" Pacific mines have been consoli- 
dated under the' n.ame of the Plymouth Consolidated 
Gold Mining Company, Capita] stock $5,000,000, 
divided into shares of $50 each. 

Closed for a Time. — The Seaton company's 
mill closes down this week, but the company will con- 
tinue to sink in the old shaft. The mill will probably 
be stopped for a month or so, 
Fresno. 
Mopes for a Boom. —Expositor, June 30: The 
news from the mining districts in this county is of an 
encouraging character, and from all appearances 
there will soon be a boom here. There are undoubt- 
edly some of the richest mines in the State located in 
Fresno. All that is required is capital and intelligent 
energy to develop them. 

At SWEDE GULCHi— The Hawk-eye quartz mill is 
completed and is running on quartz from the Hawk- 
eye mine on Swede gulch. The mill runs as smoothly 
as a watch, and the quartz, we are led to believe, will 
yield handsomely; this will add more life as well as 
prosperity to our little burg. 

A Big Enterprise.— Col. Defrees is negotiating 
with a French Co, for the rale of the Quartz Moun- 
tain mine in the sum of $200,000, one of the coiu- 
pany, Marcellus Fache, with a mining engineer 
from France, and other experts from Oakland, were 
up a few dnys since looking at the property, and say 
they find everything as well as they expected. They 
took samples of ore from various places on the mine 
and returned to San Francisco to make tests, and if 
the assays are as good as they think they will be, 
they will buy the mine and commence work immed- 
iately cutting a ditch and building a flume from the 
south fork of the north fork of the San Joaquin river, 
a distance of 23.miles, with a capacity of 3,000 inches 
of water, and erect a 120 stamp mill. This will re- 
quire an outlay of about $400,000, and if properly 
done and managed, this will be as good a piece of 
mining properly as any in the State. 
Inyo. 
Good \'u<:\,\-),-—/ndept'nrfe)i/, June 30: Messrs. 
Baker, Barnes and Keycs, of the Elgin mine, were 
in town during the week with 24'., ounces of fine re- 
torted gold, the result of working 3^ tons of ore in 
their new arastra. Considering that this first run 
was somewhat experimental, it makes a good show- 
ing, especially as the mine looks as though it will 
supply all the ore they want indefinitely. 
Kern. 
Coed Divr. CflliforttMU, Jvfty 7: Dr, Donnell) 
was here last Saturday bringing a large quantity "of 

gold dust fr hi^ < >;ik Tree mine at Long Ton), 

which he is now engaged in developing. Me thinks 
the district remarkably rich mid extensive and that 
the best mines are yet wailing to be uncovered by 
forlunalc |>ri ispectors, 

Mono. 
May l.i -\i)v. — Iloiner hidex, June 30: This 
mine is adding to its reputation as the richest gold 
mine in California, 'l he ore is not only ol a \<tv 
high grade,. biit the gold extracted is. of much Findr 
quality, and is worth several dollars per ounce more 
than that taken from any other quartz mine of note 
in the State. The mine is in excellent condition, the 
mill is kept going day and night and the bullion 
shipments are regular and hcayj . 

I'Inki.u HA.U— This is one. of the most promis- 
ing mines at the south rm\ of Tioga district. It is 
situated about 400 ft west < I ::■::) parallel to the Gol- 
den Cn>wn (of the Mount Gibbs group), and, like 
many of the mines of that section, runs from carbo- 
nate to black sulphurct ore at depth. The shaft, 
now 26 ft deep, has already passed into a ricli black 
sulphuret of silver, giving assays all the way from a 
fair milling grade up to $3,300 to the ton. 

GnNii.i.A. — Some delay was caused by the nou ar- 
rivals of track-iron for the tramway, but it is believed 
the transportation of ore from the mine to the reduc- 
tion works will begin to-day. The reduction works 
have been put in thorough repair, and the mine has 
been opened on a comprehensive scale aiid has .1 
large quantity of ore in sight, and a successful run 
may be expected. 

In Brief. — The landslide that carriedaway a sec- 
tion of the water ditch of the Virginia Creek I [vdi.ri- 
licCo., above Old Mono, caus'cd'greater damageand 
a longer suspension of mining operations than was 
expected. Wm. I .. Callahan, Recorder of Jordan 
district, and others, left on Saturday last to prospect 
for placer diggings and quartz in Convict canyon, on 
the south side of Long valley. Negotiations are in 
progress for the employment of a large force of men 
in the placer fields of the Lee Vining Creek Hydrau- 
lic Mining Association. A great deal of prospecting 
and development work is now being carried on in 
the south end of Tioga and in Prescott district. The 
Mono Lake Hydraulic Mining Co., is working 
steadily and washing away a great deal of gravel. 
1 he Cr: u Sism tumul in ttcga \r. still idle await: 
ing repairs to the machinery. 

Mkn EMPLOYED; — The following men were em- 
ployed in the Standard mine during the past week; 
Ninety miners, 18 carmen, 4 laborers, 3 watchmen, 
3 station tenders, 3 firemen, 4 tramwaymen, 3 black- 
smith's helpers and 1 woodman, at$(.perday; 2 ore- 
sorters at $3.50 per day; 3 blacksmiths, 5 engineers, 
5 carpenters, t ropeman; 1 boiler maker, 3 brakemen 
and 2 shift bosses at $5 per day; 1 chief engineer, 1 
blacksmith, 1 pumpman and 1 carpenter at $6 per 
day; 1 foreman at $250 per month, and 1 clerk. 

Standard Con.— Bodie Free PrSss, July 10: 
During the past week there was extracted and ship- 
ped to the mills 1,243 lolls u * ore - The bullion ship- 
ment was \ilued at $30,883.61. The east crosscut, 
1200 level, is in 359 ft; progress during the week, 19 
ft, with no change to note in the character of the 
rock cut through. North drift No. 1, 1000 level, is 
215 ft in length, where the vein is 1% ft wide. 
South drift No. 2 is in from the main east crosscut 
165 ft; progress for the week 13 ft. The vein in the 
face is 5 ft wide and looks well. Upraise No. 1 from 
this drift has reached a hight of 50 ft; progress 15 ft. 
The vein is 4 ft wide. The west crosscut from the 



north drift, 700 level, has been driven since last re- 
port 12 ft, and is in 336 ft. The rock is hard. The 
south drift from west crosscut No. 1 is in 159 ft; pro- 
gress for the week 14 ft. The vein is 3 ft wide. 
South drift No. 2,385 level, is in 639 ft; progress 17 
ft; vein 5 ft wide. North drift No. 2 has been ex- 
tended 248 ft, where the vein is 8 ft in width. The 
upraise from south drift No. 2 was advanced 1 | ft 
during the past week; total hight 219 ft. At this 
point the vein is 4ft wide. Upraise from north drift 
No. 1 is up 185 ft. The vein is 3 ft wide. Thestopes 
are all looking well. 

Bulwer Con. — The west crosscut from the north 
drift, 700 level, was advanced during the week 12 It, 
total length 336 ft. The ground 'is hard, South 
drift from west crosscut No. 1, 500 level, is in 140 ft; 
progress 14 ft. There is 2 ft of vein matter in the 
face. 

Bonn; Tunnel, Work in this mine is progress- 
ing favorably. The indications are encouraging. 
The null will be started up at no distant dav for a 
protracted run. 

Syndicate, -Ore extraction continues and the 
mill is kept fully supplied. There are no particular 

changes to note. 

Nevada, 

Goon Yield. — Transcript, July 4: A clean-up 
of 11 loads of quart/, from the Hartery mine made at 
Sothern's custom mill, gave $45 per load. This rock 
was taken as an average from the pile hauled to the 
mill, of which there are 60 more loads on the ground 
equally good. The ledge in the Hartery mine'" is now 
strong, about four ft in width, and of excellent qual- 
ity. The mine is being worked by the bondholders, 
who feel much encouraged hy their prospects. 

Wii.i, Use Water.— The example of the Idaho 
mine, in introducing water power for milling, hoi 1 
ing and pumping, will be generally followed up by 
the mining companies of Grass Valley district; judg- 
ing from the talk of owners -but the 'change will lie 
made gradually. 

Good for Prospectors, .-The breaking ol the 

English dam, having swept away the huge 
boulders and ripped things up gcm'ralh 1 
Middle Yuba for many miles below Lhu site of the 
dam, there will be a lair cliaiiCe for 
make discoveries of gravel dlj 



prospri i' ■!■-. 1. 1 
_ginL;s in tlir !■.!:■■ md 
channels of the stream. There air many inn reslin ; 
spots along the river just below Milton, whit h will 

now, doubtless, be closely examined, prov cl tile 

piles of boulders that filled the channel ha- 
swept away. 

_ New Yokk Hill,— Grass Yalle) Tidings, lul\ 10: 
There is good rock now coining out of the : 
New York Mill mine. Mr. Laniard Mc< tratli, fori 
man of the mine, had a box filled with specimen roi l 
which he showed lo our reporter, and the rock » ■ 
sufficiently valuable to merit a special deposit in Ih.' 
company's vault. 

Placer. 
DEituis Dam. — Herald, Tnly 7: K. c. Uren .■■ I 
liis ion Simon, of Dutch Plat, after careful!} examin- 
ing the channel of Bear river withn ww to'ascertain- 
ing the best site for building on thai stream, a retain 
ing dayi, have fixed upon a point just above tin 
mouth of Wolf (reek, and north of Auburn. Here 
the gorge is narrov, and thestdring ca"pacit) afforded 
by the spreading of the bed above would In .■ rj 
great. A dam at lliis point 75 ft high would oulj be 
about 120 ft long at the top, and as the ncce n 
material is abundant, it could be built at much c 
cost than at almost any other point on the rivei 
That a dam will be commenced here within a few 
weeks after he shall have made his report, \h. 1 ,,,, 
seemed to think more than probable. The miners, 
on the Bear river watershed, including thoseof Dutch 
Flat, and those of several smaller mining districts in 
Nevada count), are working together in this matter, 

and have in contemplation theereotion of a dam this 
summer ol sufficient dimensions at leas! to demon- 
strate 1 lie practicability of the damriijng sy lem as 1 
means of protection to tin- exposed portions ol ibe 

valley. 

The Golden Fleece Gravel Mine. After 
tunneling over 2,000 ft the owners of this property 
have struck a fine prospect of gravel and are now lif- 
ting up preparatory ',0 working die mine systematii - 
ally and extensively. They have iust 1 ompleted a 
large boarding house, and are goinij to work on theii 
dump. This mine is located on die lows I I ill 
divide about eight miles above I 'amascus, and give , 
promise of proving a von valuable property . 
San Benito. 

Sii.vkr f'K.i.si'i, vs.— Advance, July'' Silver ore 
having been, found in the San Gabilan 11 ni.un- 

and a number of claims located, a mining distriol 
called the Phillips, has been formed there, with Por- 
ter Phillips as Recorder, a petition has been forwarded 
for the appointmeni of F. DcLanza as Depulj Min- 
eral Surveyor, Tin: district adjoins * 'air's and ' a., 

gan's grants. The prospects an- consider! ri ver 
good and w ho knows but what another Almadcn 01 

New Idria may he discovered . J 



San Bernardino. 
BoKAX,— Print, Jtuie 30: Work on the boras 

claims in Fast Calico, recently purchased by Cole- 
man fr Co., has been progressing ever since the 1 om- 
pany obtained possession of the property. Several 
men are employed in taking out borax. 'The depos- 
its that are being opened up are large and of a high 
grade. A building 14x40 ft is to be erected on one 
of the claims in a tew days. It is not yet decided Now 
soon reduction works will be built for manufacturing 
the borax. 
Bullion Shipments. — The bullion output from 

the Bonanza King mine at Providence last month 
was $70,000. This month it will be about $65,000. 
The total yield of bullion from the mine from January 
1st to June ist is $301,45^92. The bullion shipped 
from the Pioneer and Oriental mills since our last re- 
port amounts to $7,373. Mr. M. Carey, superinten- 
dent of the Ibex mine, brought in $3,311 worth of 
bullion from that mine yesterday. About $to,ooo 
in bullion was shipped from the Oro Grande mill this 
week, being the result of a week's run on Silver King 
ore. About $6,000 worth of bullion was shipped 
from the Waterman mine this week. 

Holcomr Valley.— Mr. John Haley, thepreseni 
owner of the English Co.'s works and quartz mill in 
Holeomb valley, \vill soon place the mill in running 
operation and commence work on his different min- 
ing properties in that locality. Owing to a system 
of "freeze out," these mines have lain idle for a long 
time, but it is hoped that work will again commence 



Joly 14, 1883.J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



21 



and the pi I 

mining 

» hi i..K no. I'j \< krs.— Messrs, Sullivan, White 
and Henderson have gone out I 
mines al tl : Baldy. Thej 

Utonio gulche 
prospects l«oorning. 

Sierra. 
Various Mini ' 

est ( it\, 

i gold last wo 

el taken from the s 

fc Hi ■ :ntly worked iwo 

from their ledge in Slog Canyon, thai 

paid .1 little over $17 per ton. Indications favor their 

■■■ in llu- 

['his j 

■ tilling ore 
1 1 Monday I »r. Sav 

Id from the 1001 drift mine. 

: 1 ■ 

men. I Ifty eighl oum es ol ■ old *> 1 

ihing at it"- 1 drift mine. 

1 he p 

■ 

■ ■..!. rhe 
supply ol the Ruby 

di iii ii 

NEVADA. 

Washoe Di 

I During 

■ : 1 ned 

I the new 

lin 1 

irallel with tin- track, relayed 

, m of tra< L . taken up while cutting drain, 

in drain, put dow n switch, removed 

f old timbers, put up fivi and two 

■ d from point 18, ■ 

~i t an( ] : , . Hi.. ...■■ i iii the 

■ have been 

.1 fly-wheel 

running engine for hoisting water— 

.■ ill if In paired cage 

; equal * ^.700 gal- 
lons per 24 hours. The following temperatures were 
,111-. water 120 . ( >s- 
onnectton, -or 100 , water 120'. 
lin, Mori h-i ■ ■ cut. The joint west 
. 00 level ol ii"- I nion and Sierra 
■ mines is still being pushed ahead. The race 
j showed more water than has yet been found. 
.1 not amount to much. As the 

in spurting streams, but merely 
1 the rork, it indicates no 
ionic mall seams of quarts have been 
he water appears to come 
fri .hi about > : 

Mali, and M ■' nierprise, July 1 1 ; The 

hi the 2000 level of the Hale and Norcross 
lining up 73 ft. The rock continues dry. 
[400 level they are iow doing nothing. The 
own from that level has been pumped out. 
1 . ii hi and drifts are now dry. The winze 

in-low the S500 level has Ik-en pumped out to the 
depth * Vs iii- j are now so near 1 onnecting 

and 1- better progress can be made in working up- 
...... . 1 mi, [hey will not sink in the bot- 

tom of the winze Should they now begin blasting 
above it would endanger the men in the upraise. 
I he connection will probably be made in five or six 
days, ! ■■ below the 2600 level was last even- 

ing down ;s ft, Next week active operations will 
be resumed in all the middle mines, as the much-de- 
sired air connection will be made the first of the 



ek. 



Bernlce District. 



New Mill. — Reveille, {uly 3: Five stamps in the 
new mill in this district has been started and the 
dropping of the others will follow in a few days. 
["here is considerable activity among the miners, the 
mill affording them an opportunity of realizing- from 
their ledges. "i here is considerable ore accumulated 
on the dumps of the various mines. 

Will Star'] Up. - rhe trouble about title to the 
|3reeti mine, Midas flat, having been - settled, the mil! 
there has resumed operations and the mine will now 
he worked for all that is in it, and we are confident 
that it will prove a success, 

A iter Many Years. — Thejnill at Ophir has been 
running steadily for several mouths past turning out 
regular shipments of bullion. The ore, which is taken 
from the old dumps, was several years ago thrown 
1 worthless. Last week a few men were 
set to work in the mine and they took out several 
tons of roek that nulled $50 per ton. The mill closed 

dovi the 30II1 ultimo to make necessary' repairs 

but dropped stamps again on the fifth. 

W VNTBD, — A custom mill is badly needed in 
Union Mining district. Chloriders can take out con- 
siderable ore that would pay them well if they could 
get it worked in tile district, but it will not pay to 
ship to Austin or Salt Lake. 

Quartz Discoveries. —Sentinel, July 6: A 
quartz lode that promises to pay has lately been found 
near WUderville. A quartz vein near Willow springs 
is being tested. Wm, Griffin, of Wilderville was in 
town this week. He has found a new quartz ledge 
in that vicinity recently which he thinks will pay well 
if the necessary machinery is put on. For the first 
Lime water has got so low at A. W. Sturgis" drifting 
claim on Jackass creek that he has been compelled 
to suspend for the season. Supt. Ennis of the Ster- 
ling mine says water has failed so fast during the 
warm weather, i hat cleaning up his commenced con- 
siderabl) earlier than usual. The run was short, but 

Will no doubt prove a good one. 

Columbus District. 

NORTHERN Belle. — According to the recent re- 
port of this company, about sixty tons of ore are be- 
ing extracted and sent to the mills daily, Both mills 
are running steadily and doing good work. The 
crushing for the Great Western mine has been com- 
pleted, and mill No. 2 is now engaged entirely upon 
the company's ore^ The bullion shipments amount- 
ed to $14,161.25 for the week ending June 28, and 
aggregate $41,778.09 on June account to the same 
date. 

Eureka District. 

Eureka Con. — Sentinel, July 4: The drift from 
the new shaft is in 15 ft. In a few days Mr. Read, 



that from 30 to 40 ft 
will Ik; made daily, and this ma) 
to 50 when drifti 

sump at the bottom of the 1200 level, from v. 
: timbered u| 

; of sufficient Im- 
portance l< i.d mention. 

Eureka I > hnkl, that there 

is no truth in the story thai the Eureka run 
be worked by tribulcrs. 1 h- -ays he has no id 
1 started, i 

can be no reason to think of giving ii a\ 
GarHeld District. 
Various Minks. — True fissure. Jul* 7: The 
iking well. The 
■ me 300 and one 
n length, in both of winch there is a large 
Iwdy of high gi for ex- 

traction whenever the owners [I out for 

nulling. The ' 

in's mine in this district. It 

has paid steadily from the grass roots do n 
averaging $250 to the I ground, 

! 
taking OUt the ore. 1 !. 

: iin< I l)i 1 i.t.ly mine, 

next in importance, is owned b) parties in Dayton, 

men. I'io--," 

developinj ol ore. The Bkn 

has produi t 'ii il ■ 

; I there has been 

m> work I'hejohl s McDonald mines 

idle, I hey have had a checkered career, 

and from there is no likelihood of any 

;;■.; done there for some time. Mini 1 leek 

ing employment, bettei keepawaj froi 

e only twenty-four men working foi 
and no show from the present outlook for times to 
Improve. 

Pioche District. 
Meadow Valley. — Sentinel, fune 30: The., re 
now being extracted from this mine has gieatly im- 
proved the last week. The miners estimate the im- 
provement at $20 per ton. The company cou 
the ledge and make it pay a big profit. Fift) 

men placed 1 1 w ork in the mine would help ■ 
derfully these dull times. The lower workings of the 
Day mine continue to Improve as work pn 

body of ore is now exposed. May she keep 

up her lick. A 90-po 1 bar of bullion was cast last 

Saturday at the tailing mill at the lower end of town 

1 of six days' run. The boilers that were 
first put in the mill leaked so that they had to be 

.111, and new ones are now being put in. 

Pyramid District. 

i hi I'.-.i s and K.INKEAD. Reno Gaxeite, June 
30: The air compressor for this mine, situated near 
Pyramid Lake, came down to-day from Virginia, and 
will be taken ii 1 the mine to-morrow. After it is set 
up, sixty days will complete the tunnel. Then the 
anxious stock-holders will know all. 
Safford District. 

Shipping Oresto Salt '.Lake.— Express, July 
7: After thorough inquin we arc able to give the 

necessary information concerning the rates charged 
for shipping and reducing Safford ores at Salt Lake, 
which will show clearly the reasons for not being able 
to work them in this section of the country, or at Eu- 
reka, as we had at first suggested. In conversation 
with Mr. Mather, the manager of the Salt Lake fur- 
naces, who is at present sojourning here, he informs 
us that he pays the full assay value for all ores, de- 
ducting only $12 a ton for working charges and $8.25 
for transportation from the dumps to Safford, making 
$20.25 the total charge for hauling and reducing. 
Consequently, ore assaying but $26 per ton would 
net the owners $4.7^, making il available and profit- 
able to ship ores of a very low grade, Mr. Mather 
explains by saying that our ores carry so much iron 
that they are desirable for smelting Utah ores, which 
alone would make them worth something, even 
though they did not carry much silver. In the light 
of these facts it should induce our miners to develop 
their properties, as the district abounds in low-grade 
ores which, under the above rates, can be shipped to 
Utah at a handsome profit. Ores of a high grade are 
treated in the same manner, a ton of $300 ore not 
costing any more to ship and reduce than a ton of an 
inferior quality. When it is taken into consideration 
that furnaces in this section pay but 67 per cent of 
the assay value, besides charging $12 per ton for re- 
duction, not counting the transportation rates, it is 
not to be wondered at that ores are shipped to Salt 
Lake city, a distance of nearly 400 miles, and work- 
ed cheaper than al home. 

Taylor District. 
Monitor Mink. — They have sunk on the ledge 
130 ft. There are two ft of ore at the bottom of this 
shaft that worked an average of over $100. It 
looks splendid and is going down at an angle of 
about 66*. 

Tuscarora District. 
Works Burned. — The hoisting works of the 
Grand Prize & Argenta company al Tuscarora, were 
destroyed by fire oil the evening of June 29. Sage 
brush was usSd.il) firing up and a spark ignited the 
pile in the boiler room during the temporary absence 
of the fireman. On his return the entire room was 
in a blaze and soon the entire structure was inflames. 
Al Griffin, the engineer on duty, hoisted over two 
men who were on the 300 ft level while the roof was 
blazing. Six' men below that level escaped b\ coming 
up an old shaft. It will require $30,000 to replace 
the machinery and structure. Insurance $10,000. 
White Pine District. 
The EliERHAROT. — /Yews, July 7: We are in- 
formed that Capt. Drake, of the Eberhardt tunnel, 
■has had another $100,000 placed at his disposal bj 
his company to earn on the work of exploration ill 
Treasure Hill. He will shortly start up the burleighs 
again. A persevering company is that same Eber- 
hardt. The Konigsberg mine, is looking finely and 
promises well for the future. Mr. Jacobson, the 
owner, is now in Eureka with a shipment of rich ore. 
The Smoky mill is running steadily. Several of its 
working force quit this week, owing, it is said, to the 
unsatisfactory rate of wages paid. The ore teams 
are making their regular trips from the Hill, and will 
have all they can do till the season closes. 



near Corbai, — the LI Dora 

in, on the mines near Shei wins peak, where 
■ 
near Chi four fi 

three tor 

mill during I 

milling ore and the mine being only half a mite from 
the mill :' . 

lapping u. Robert D'Yhr is working on 

the * »i" lino and has 

sight. Johnny Kenned) and I". H.c 

■ 

The tunnel on the l£va mine .it S 

is now in 7:, ft and is cl \i the 

..... 
I I nn the 150 1. 

1 extracted. At this pi ... 

loIj foe to the 
being -unk to 
connect with the _-oo level. It has aliead) been Mink 
about 20 1 1 

When that is di ■ 
ft of drifting to 1 onnci 1 

wnh the 200 level with the shaft. When all this is 
done perfect ventilation will be secure 
level. In linking the shafl two 1 1 irallel tn 
rich ore have 

six inches in width. Samples of the ore from this 
IO0 and $500, the OP 

antiraoniaJ silver. The Silver 
king ( o. are building an office at the mine. They 
are sinking the mam shaft and are striking for 1000 
ire now making a station at xoo ft. 



COLORADO. 



Dbrr LoixiK.— TTi will bo 

. ^withstanding 
contrary. They will also her of much 
ty than ected, 

iter- Mountain, July 7: I In 
dl> ranks as the rich 

excelled in the 
Texriton by the properties of the Heel 
Gregory is a big 1 
be in ordei 
lion. Our 

. onsignment tn value. If die] 

for install. 

■ ■ 

foui times the value of the Helena shipment I 

1 1 month, 

Butte is now producing and shipping bullion 

1 • 200,000 per 



NEW MEXICO. 



1 ih 

N01 he 



Divers Mines. R . < An assay of 

ore from the Garfield mine in Lake district, consid- 
er'.-. I to bean average sample of in inches of crevice 
matter, 69 ounces silver per ton. The Garfield is 
the same belt of veins as the Mascotte and south of 
the Williams. The Waterman mill will start up next 
week 011 Legal Tender ore. This mine un . 1 the 
Waterman lease, is developing into a first-class prop- 
erty, as the amount and quality of the ore which is 
being taken out shows up to the utmosi satisfaction 
of both lessors and lessees. The Native Silver mine 
at Caribou was sold last Saturday to Joseph Lloyd 
for $8,823.35, and the mill was bid in M >' ™ r - Buck- 
ingham for $4,465.03. Both are cheap as dirt. Now 
the mine and mill should both be started up under 
practical management. Since work was resumed on 
the Bull-of-the- Woods the crevice of iron about two 
inches in thickness, has widened out to over 16 
inches of solid mineral, the full width of the crevice 
matter between walls being over three It. The min- 
eral is a bluish sulphuret, and prospects well. A 
mill and smelting run will be made next week. A 
large number of prospectors are in camp at Hot Sul- 
pher "Springs, waiting to get into Carbonate. The 
bridges are swept away and thestreamsare too much 
swollen to ford them. The rich strike recently made 
al Irwin, in the Gunnison country, proves the re- 
markable richness of the field around the Forest 
Queen property. The new discovery is on the north 
extention of the Fores! Queen, has a vein 18 inches 
in width and was made at the bottom of a shaft 36 ft 
deep. Mill superintendent Lewis deposited last even- 
ing at the First National Bank, this city, 24439 
ounces of gold retort cleaned up from the California 
Mine Co.'s stamps in Black Haw k. A portion of this 
came from the Kent county mine, one of the mills of 
the company have been employed in crushing for the 
Kent Co, since the accident on the California sonn 



days ag 
$3,509- 



The gold has a currency valuation of 



IDAHO. 



ARIZONA. 

VARIOUS MINES. — Mojave Miner, June 30: Work 
i being actively prosecuted on the Paymasterand New 



Chance to Invest. — World, July 3: The El- 
mira Co. have got to the line of the Silver Chief 
claim, at a depth of 300 ft, and the vein shows up 
beyond all expectation. This is a grand opening for 
capitalists— probably the best in the Territory, and 
it is now held at a very reasonable figure. The 
Chinese Co. working Sam White's drifting ground 
on the shares washed up the other day. The clean- 
up was very good. We don't know the exact figures 
but it amounted to several thousand dollars. The 
company has been at work on this run since last 
November. 

ANOTHER RUSH. — There is almost as much ex- 
citement 12 miles this way from Sheep mountain as 
at the latter place, over recent discoveries of an im- 
mense free gold quartz district of fee millinggold ore, 
and large numbers of prospectors are now exploring 
and locating claims there. 

Good RESULTS. — The recent clean-up at the Elk 
Horn mill, report says was $8,000, the result of a few- 
weeks' run on Pride of Idaho ore. The mill has only 
five stamps. 

AT Pmu.iPSitUKG. — The Algonquin mill started 
up a -few days ago on Granite mountain ore, and thus 
nr the results are quite equal to the most sanguine 
expectations of interested parlies. The Hope is not 
doing so well. Nevertheless, the mill keeps pound- 
ing away. 

Sheep Mountain. — There are now about too 

men in this district and more going in daily. Some 
good discoveries have been made of rich galena de- 
posits and many claims located. 

FROM THE Basin.— In this locality the Gold lljjl 
Co. is working a force of about 80 men in and about 
the mine and mill. 1 Jevelopments on the 400 level 
and in the western extension continue tube satisfac- 
tory, and the usual amount of work is being done. 
This is one of the most remarkable mines on the 
coast, both as regards permanent richness and skill- 
ful management. With mill, hoisting works and every 
needed facility on the largest scale, yet the companj 
fiisliurse large amounts monthly, ^\u\ all so quietly 
as scarcely to give any sign of its existence. 

MONTANA. 

TllF. MOULTON. — Inter Mountain, July 8: Every- 
thing is looking well at this mine. Til the 200 foot 
west drift, which is being actively forwarded, a very 
fine vein has been struck which improves as the 
drift progresses. This drift is on the middle or main 
ledge. ( 'n the 300 foot level on the south vein a 
winze to the level below has been started which has 
attained a depth 50 ft show ing good ore al! the wa\ 
down. It is at present three ft wide in the bottom 
and assays by sample $75 per ton, The mill contin- 
ues Well supplied With ore, 



COAl inel Somi 

■■i Marque : disi overed 1 tb ■ 
on his ranch three miles north ol Silver 1 ity. 
ing able himsell [< 1 expl< ■■ 

.1 fh 'in . ither pai lie* 1 ■ en ible him 
so, the art ■ 

results, an incline has * • of the 
seams which has opened out to 1 of over 
four inches at the face of the drift— 12 ft froi 
point where first opened. There i! no quesl 

the character of the coal. It 1- Rrst-class bituminous 

and .1 sai k full of it ma) I 1 t Blai It's planing 

mill. Further, then- can be but little doubt that the 
seam will open to a width which 1 lofitable 

working— and that Silver Citj m an en 

lution in the matter of inel. 
Coppi R Deposits.— But little work i ■■■■ being done 
now in 1 tanover district fi ir l« rst, the 

new strike at Fleming drew man) ol the miners and 
prospectors to that place; secondly, thecopper mar- 
ket has bei 11 " low for thepast few week, that par- 
ties owning copper mines have suspended work, 
awaiting a rise in that metal This camp is one of 
the most promising and best developed in the county. 
It is a large district, extending over an exten 
of country, and the facilities for cheap minin 
unexcelled. Among the more promising claims are 
the Albion, the fames 1 air belonging to Hutchison 

andShanley; the Iron King and "8r, the I 01 

the Chamberlain and Bennett group, and the Willis 

mincx Hutchison and Shanlcv have two tunnels 
driven in on the Jim Fair, one 162 ft long, and tin- 
other 58. The upper tunnel is being driven through 
an immense bod) of good paying copper ore, carry- 
ing magnetic iron and white spar — sufficient lor flu\- 

ing purposes. The '81 is furnishing ore f 

ters at San Jose, and it is said is yielding well. There 
are large bodies of silver carbonate ore being un- 
earthed in this camp running from $25 to $250 per 
ton. The district is well watered, good roads lead- 
ing from there in all directions, and the grazing can- 
not be excelled anywhere. Kingston mines are 1" - 

ing up and the Las Vegas parties who are inter ted 
in that nourishing mining camp, will make consider* 
able, from their investments. 

OREGON. 

North Pa< iftc Company. — Oregonian, Tub 7 : 
This company has secured the sew ices of ]. I -. 1 locy 
an experienced mill man from California, whoisbus) 
overhauling their mill preparatory to starting up 
again and who thinks he.can successfully handle this 
ore. The kinds of base metal in the rock are not 
many. There is magnetic and manganesi iron, 
some little pyrites of iron and soap stone. I he ku- 
ter is the worst substance the owners have to contend 
with. U has to be neutralized by some means t< 

warrant success in working theore. An experienced 
miner understands the kind of acid that will free the 
pu'p from the eflet is of the soap stone. The null has 
shut down until the new arrangements for better work 
can be supplied, which will take a week or ten da> 
to get them in place. The gold is in the rock and 
all that 1- needed is to work it out and save it. \\ 11- 
liam Elliott returned to the Swank a few da] 
from Ingall's creek. He could not do anything there 
on account of snow. He says he will prosecute his 
.-..■.ir. lies in that quaru-r in about three weeks, when 
he thinks the snow will have disappeared. Ingall's 
creek runs through a very deep and narrow canyon, 
and the divide between Nigger creek and Ingall's is 
somewhere near 7.000 ft high. Hence the snow al 
this late period. A piece of gold weighing 2 ; ounces 
was piched up lit a claim at Pocahontas, eight miles 
west of Baker < 'itv. 



UTAH. 

Tintk DisTKh -r.— Trihuiif, July 8: The min- 
ing outlook here is good,' with the execpton of the 
Mammoth prcpirt*. which islvir.^ idle not from *.n\ 
fault of the mine, but from bad management. The 
Eureka|mineis turning out about 30 tons of ore per day, 
which is being shipped to Colorado to be smelted. 
The Heck is working about 20 men; the properly is 
looking fair, and the output is regular. Messrs. 
Smith and Martin have taken charge of the Red Bird 
('on. at Eureka, and are putting in line steam hoist- 
ing works, one of the best yet erected in the district. 
These men it is supposed have made a good strike in 
the property. The Park has a concentrator at work. 
Thegangue or waste from this mine is very soft and 
easily washes away, leaving the concentrates in the 
form" of lend ore very rich ill silver. The old Chica- 
go has a good strike on it, lately made in the well 
defined ledge which runs about 100 ounces in silver. 
The Northern Spi is supplying the Tintic mill with 
ore, is doing a good business, and has a steady "in- 
put. Those interested in Tintic mines are satisfied 
with the condition of their properties in general, 
while they regret that the Mammoth is not among 
the producers of bullion. 

Items.— The Germania White Lead Works are 
turning out their regular quota of lead, and making 
stead) shipmi n)ts. Preparations are going on at the 
works for manufacturing various colors of paint, ;\m\ 
they expect soon to be able to supply the \\ est w uh 
excellent colors. Dry Canyon and Ophir mines are 
shipping some jne lookingbre to the sampling works 
The mines of Bingham are 



■ ii . . 



in this city. 

down their usual quantity of ore, and much 
development is going on in that district. I'h$ bul- 
lion receipts continue to increase, and the mi 
reported as looking better in all the lending di irk t:j 
of the Territory. 



22 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 14, 1883 



Metallurgy of Nickel. 

We have from time to time recorded the suc- 
cess of the efforts made abroad in the manufact- 
ure of pure nickel, and the progress made in 
securing new applications for it. As foreign 
experimenters have taken much pains to keep 
their aspirations and their results before the 
public, it has been the impression of all but a 
few who had special opportunity to inform 
themselves that the credit for the results 
achieved was due chiefly, if not exclusively, to 
those who have labored in this field in Germany 
and in France. It is tbe merit of Prof. W. P. 
Blake, of New Haven, to have come forward to 
correct that opinion; and while giving full credit 
for good work done by others, he has directed 
attention to the fact that Mr. Joseph Wharton, 
of Camden, N. J. , wasinreality the first toproduce 
pure nickel in a malleable state and in consid- 
erable quantities. Professor Blake exhibited a 
remarkable series of specimens at the Boston 
meeting of the mining engineers; and from the 
paper read on that occasion, we take the follow- 
ing interesting data: 

Inasmuch as nickel first became known com- 
mercially in the industrial arts in the form of 
an alloy, there were no special attempts to pro- 
duce the metal in a state of extreme purity. 
The nickel-silver of commerce answered all the 
existing demands, and was, of course, much 
easier to make and cheaper than pure nickel. 
It found a large and rapidly extending con- 
sumption as a substitute for silver spoons and 
forks, and for silverware generally, especially 
when the new art of electro -plating was devel- 
oped by Spencer, Smee, and others. The 
nickel-silver was specially well adapted to re- 
ceive and hold the deposit of silver, and it is to 
this day the most desirable alloy for plating. 

The use of nickel alloy for small or subsidiary 
coins next made an increased demand for nickel. 
Tentative efforts were made by Dr. Feutcht- 
' wanger, in New York, in the year 1837, and he 
actually issued many one cent and three cent 
pieces, made of a nickel alloy, the exact com- 
position of which he was careful not to state, 
but called it " Feuchtwanger's Composition." 
Switzerland began using nickel alloy coins in 
18.50; the United States in 1857, though sam- 
2)le coins, one cent pieces, had been made by 
I'rof. James C. Booth, at Philadelphia, in 1853, 
the prepared alloy containing from five of nickel 
and ninety-five of copper to as high as thirty of 
nickel and 70 of copper. The alloy adopted by 
law consisted of twelve of nickel and eighty- 
eight of copper. The five cent pieces now in 
circulation are made of an alloy of twenty-five 
parts of nickel and seventy-five parts of copper. 
In 1860, Belgium adopted an alloy of the same 
proportions, for small coins. Other countries 
have followed, until the use of nickel alloy for 
small coins may be said to be almost universal 
in the chief commercial countries. Up to June 
30, 1870, the United States had alone issued of 
the five cent nickel to the extent of $6,716,129 
in value. Another sudden demand for a larger 
supply of nickel sprang up when the art of de- 
posiiing nickel by electricity was perfected. 
The many and increasing applications of this 
art need not be here enumerated. It is suffi- 
cient to state that, at the present time, they 
constitute a large part of tbe present consump- 
tion of the metal in this country, where the art 
may be said to have originated in a successful, 
practical form. 

Nickel ore is more generally distributed 
throughout the mineral-bearing portions of the 
United States than is generally supposed. It 
is commonly associated with chrome ores 
from Canada to Maryland on the Atlantic side, 
and equally with the chrome ores of the Pacific 
slope, notably in Oregon. It is also a common 
associate of magnetic pyrites in the Archaean 
rocks, being found in Litchfield county, in 
Connecticut; in the Highlands of the Hudson, 
in New York and inNewJersey;andspeciallyat 
Lancaster (tap, in Pennsylvania, where the chief 
supply of nickelliasbeen obtained for the United 
States. This ore yields from one and one-half 
to two per cent, of nickel, but is enriched by- 
smelting at the mine into a matte containing 
10 per cent or more of the metal. This local- 
ity was worked some 30 years ago by Prof. 
James ( '. Booth and others, of Philadelphia 
and some nickel alloy was made. Some 10 
years later, Mr. Joseph Wharton purchased the 
works and established the industry at Camden, 
X. -1., opposite Philadelphia, where it has 
since been carried forward. 

A large portion of the metal produced at 
these works by Mr. Wharton, has been used at 
the United States Mint for the subsidiary 
small coins, and a considerable amount has 
been exported. Since the developing of nickel- 
ing by galvanism, a large part of the product 
lias been put into the form of nickel salts and 
anodes. 

But Mr. Wharton, not being content with 
the production of impure nickel, early began 
experimenting to determine whether nickel 
could not be produced in a pure and malleable 
condition, susceptible of being worked in 
nearly the same manner as iron, and of being 
applied in the manufacture of various objects, 
requiring strength of material and a material 
that cannot be easily oxidized. One of his 
earliest experiments was to take the somewhat 
spongy mass got by reduction of the oxide of 
nickel, and, after heating it to fulf redness, 
work it under a steam-hammer into a bar. 

In 1873, Mr. Wharton sent to the Vienna 
Exhibition a sample of nickel in the form of 
axles and axle-bearings, and at the exhibition 



in Philadelphia in 1876, he exhibited a remark- 
able series of objects made of wrought nickel, 
such as bars, rods, a cube, a horseshoe magnet, 
and magnetic needles of forged nickel. These 
did not excite the interest to which they were 
entitled as a remarkable advance in the work- 
ing of this little known metal. The exhibit did 
not cause much comment, and it was not spec- 
ially described or reported upon, so far as I am 
aware, except by the judges who reported the 
exhibit to the Commission as worthy of an 
award in the following terms: "A fine collection 
of nickel ores from Lancaster county, Pa., with 
nickel-matte, metallic nickel in grains and 
cubes, and manufactured nickel, both cast and 
wrought; nickel magnets and magnetic needles, 
cast cobalt, electro -plating with nickel and co- 
balt, and salts and oxides of both these metals, 
the whole showing a remarkable degree of prog 
ress in their metallurgical treatment." 

Some of the same objects formed of wrought 
nickel were sent over to Paris two years later, 
and were exhibited in the American section in 
1878. There, as in Philadelphia, they did not 
at first excite any surprise or receive any special 
attention. Very few persons realized what the 
objects really were, and that they were very 
different from alloys of nickel. In fact, very 
few chemists had ever seen nickel. Pure nickel 
was a rarity, a curiosity, just as samples of in 
dium or thallium are to-day. 

You can then, perhaps, imagine the incre^ 
dulity of the expert chemists and metallurgists 
of Europe, when whole ingots and forged bars 
of metal and numerous finished articles of pure 
wrought nickel, without alloy, were offered for 
inspection. These articles not differing greatly 
in their appearance from the higher grades of 
nickel alloys, or from electro -nickel objects, 
they passed them without surprise. No pre 
vious exhibition had been so rich in exhibits of 
the use of nickel and in the products from them. 
The influx of the pure carbonated and oxidized 
ores from New Caledonia had greatly stimulated 
the nickel industry in Europe, and had im- 
proved the quality of the alloys of nickel. New 
companies had been formed to manufacture 
nickel-silver and to produce nickel from these 
superior ores at a lower cost than had before 
been possible. Christofle, of Paris, had just 
erected extensive works at St. Denis, and had 
made a most brilliant display of his products in 
one of the main avenues of the exposition. The 
Vivians, of Swansea, and other exhibitors, had 
large cases filled with beautiful objects of hol- 
low and solid ware made of nickel-silver. Amid 
these various exhibits of striking tours deforce, 
the modest little show-case from the United 
States with examples of manufactures of jntre 
lorougkt nickel, not alloy, could hardly be ex- 
pected to excite attention and win the golden 
award, which was most cheerfully accorded as 
soon as the fact was demonstrated by analysis 
that the objects were really of the pure metal. 
Some of the objects now shown were at that 
exhibition, and have retained their brilliant 
polish and (luster unimpaired. These notable 
advances in the metallurgy of nickel, made with 
the lean and sulphuretted ores of Lancaster 
Gap, prepared the way for greater advances. 

Dr Fleitmann, of Iserlohn, Westphalia, 
Prussia, has improved and cheapened the oper- 
ation of refining the nickel and toughening it, 
and has reduced the liability to the presence of 
blow-holes in castings by adding to the molten 
charge, in the pot, when ready to pour, a very 
small quantity of magnesium. This is immedi- 
ately decomposed, magnesia is formed, and 
graphite is separated. It would seem that the 
magnesium decomposes the occluded carbonic 
oxide, or reduces it to a minimum. The mag- 
nesium must be added with great care, and in 
small portions, as it unites explosively with the 
charge. It is stirred in. About one ounce 
of magnesium is sufficient for sixty 
pounds of nickel. From three-quarters of 
an ounce to fifty-four pounds of metal have 
been used with success by Mr. Wharton. The 
nickel from the ore at Lancaster gap seems not 
to require as much as the foreign metal. It 
is to be noted that complete malleability of 
nickel was obtained at Wharton's works in 
Camden, before Fleitmann's invention or 
process, but this last is more rapid and 
better than the old method. The metal 
so treated becomes remarkably tough and 
malleable, and may be rolled into sheets 
and drawn into wire. Cast plates can 
be successfully rolled. The cast plates, such as 
are made for anodes, after reheating, are rolled 
down to the desired thickness. It is found that 
it is a great improvement to the nickel anode 
plates to roll them down. They dissolve with 
greater uniformity in the bath. Nickel so 
treated with magnesium has been rolled into 
sheets as thin as paper. Expensive works for 
rolling the metal have been erected by Mr. 
Wharton at Camden. There is already a train 
of forty-inch rolls, eighteen inches in diameter, 
with annealing ovens and gas furnaces and their 
adjuncts, and a ninety horse-power engine. At 
present, this mill, as well as the works for pro- 
ducing the metal, and the mine also, are "shut 
down." The largest sheet yet rolled at Cam- 
den is seventy-two inches long and twenty- four 
inches wide, of pure nickel. 

Dr. Fleitmann has also succeeded in welding 
sheet nickel upon iron and upon steel plates, so 
as to coat them equally on each face with a 
layer of nickel. The quantity preferred by 
weight is eight-tenths iron and two-tenths 
nickel, one-tenth of nickel being placed on each 
surface. To secure union, the iron or steel 
must be perfectly flat and clean. A pile is 
made with outer facings of sheet iron to pro- 
tect the nickel from scaling. Wheu the whole 



is heated to the proper degree, it is 
through the rolls. The two metals become so 
firmly united that they may afterward be rolled 
down two or three together, or separately, to 
the thinness desired. — Engineering and Mining 
Journal. 

Mineral Resources of Colombia. 

The notes on the Central Provinces of Colom- 
bia, recently read before the Geographical So- 
ciety by Mr. R. B. White, contain a large 
amount of information interesting not only to 
the shareholders in the Frontino and Bolivia 
Company, but to all who have capital embarked 
in Colombian enterprise. 

The State of Antioquia, although it may be 
generally looked upon as a great table land, is 
broken up by some very deep valleys. That of 
the river Arma is 5,000 feet in depth, and marks 
the line of a great east and west fracture, and 
the river Porce, which runs in a valley even 
deeper than the preceding, follows a north and 
south line. The general elevation of most of 
the country in Antioquia is 6,000 feet above the 
sea, and it may be considered as the highlands 
of this part of Colombia. A great deal of in- 
formation has been published respecting the 
lower Atrato, particularly in connection with 
projected interoceanic canals. The upper por 
tions of this great valley, with their relatively 
healthy climate and fertile lands, are accessible 
by steamer from the Atlantic ocean, and can 
also be easily placed in communication with the 
interior and more populated parts of Colombia. 

At first sight, the enormous trees in these 
dense forests would lead one to suppose that 
they must be of immense age; but a compari- 
son with the vegetation which has sprung up 
on what are undoubtedly 

Old Spanish Mine Workings, 
Dating no further back than the year 1600, con- 
vinces one that the greater part of these forests 
are not more than 200 or 300 years old, and 
probably at the time of the Spanish conquest, 
there must have existed here vast tracts of open 
country, filled with Indian population, occupy- 
ing themselves in agriculture and general in- 
dustry. At present there is only a bad mule 
track from Ouibdo, on the Atrato to Bolivar, 
but there are no obstacles to the construction 
of a good road or even of a railroad. 

In the northern part of the State of Antio- 
quia 

The River Cauca, 

Before joining the Magdalena, receives the 
waters of the Nechi and the Porce. These riv- 
ers and the extensive region surrounding their 
junction are of great interest. Ranges of low 
hills, dying away in extensive plains, which are 
not, however, as a rule, swampy, are the char- 
acteristics of this district. The climate is hot, 
but not unhealthy, in the sense in which the 
term is usually applied to hot and low-lying 
tropical districts. The lazy negro race of the 
coast has no tendency to spread inland, and the 
mountaineer from Antioquia has no liking for a 
hot climate. The Spaniards found this region 
was called Zenufana, or "Land of Gold." A 
great Indian road, probably connecting Bogota, 
the capital of the Zipa, with the Zenu and 
Darien kingdoms, and ultimately with Central 
America, traversed the country. The first 
Spanish " conquistadores " found immense 
wealth amongst the Indians, who must have 
been very numerous. The Indians worked the 
gold mines, both alluvial and quartz, with 
which the whole country abounds, and they 
ontinued to work them under the direction of 
the Spaniards. The greater part appear to 
have been of a low grade of civilization, but 
the artistic work in gold and pottery which 
is found in some parts, would seem to indicate 
that the majority of the tribes were more or 
less savage tributaries of more advanced races. 
The Frontino and Bolivia, and one or two 
other 

English Companies. 
Are working gold quartz mines in this region 
with good results. Other mines, both alluvial 
and quartz, are worked in a rude way by the 
natives, and the total produce amounts to about 
70,000 ounces per annum. Coal is abundant on 
the banks of the Nechi and Cauca, and the 
seams are favorably placed for working. Of 
the population of the State of Antioquia about 
15,000 are professionally engaged in gold min- 
ing, and the agricultural produce obtained by 
the hard labor of the rest of the inhabitants 
only just suffices for their wants. The Span- 
iards attempted to colonize this part after hav- 
ing successfully entered the country via the 
Darien and the Sinu, but their early colonies 
were destroyed by the Indians, and amongst 
them the first city of Santa Fe de Antioquia, 
which was afterwards rebuilt where it now 
stands. 

The Enormous Riches of this Region 
Are matters of history. The headwaters of the 
rivers San Jorge, Sinu, Leon and Rio Sucio run 
through an elevated country, fertile and healthy. 
The San Juan valley is to the south province of 
the Choco what the Atrato is to the north. 
The region is interesting on account of its vege- 
table products and the rich alluvial gold depos- 
its of the San Juan basin. In making a jour- 
ney from Buenaventura up the San Juan to 
Novita, one meets with no evidences of civiliza- 
tion. The present town of Novita, the capital 
of the province, is quite modern. The old 
town, which was about two miles away, was 
abandoned when the slaves were set free and 
its rich mines could be no longer worked. The 



western face of the Torre hill is a horseshoe- 
shaped amphitheater, which, sloping down in 
the first place from the head of the mountain 
for a distance of half a mile or so, terminates in 
an abrupt precipice; also of a semi-circular 
form, over which hundreds of streams, which 
collect their waters on the upper slopeB of the 
hill, fall in silver threads to a sheer depth of 
over 3,000 feet, and collect together at the bot- 
tom, forming the river Surama, whose sources 
have been previously incorrectly marked as be- 
ing on the eastern flank of the Torra mountain. 
Nearly the whole of the distance traversed from 
Novita, as well as the mountain itself, abounded 
in auriferous quartz lodes, and the greater part 
of the streams showed prospects of gold in the 
alluviums. Much of the country, at an eleva- 
tion of 3,000 to 4,000 feet above the sea, is 
healthy and suitable for agriculture, and the 
schistose rocks, which are its principal charac- 
teristic, are not by any means unfavorable to 
the fertility of the soil. It would be quite prac- 
ticable to open road communication with the 
river Tamana, and if sufficient capital were em- 
ployed an important mining center, assisted by 
agricultural establishments for the supply of 
provisions, might here be formed. 
A very large proportion of the 
Platinum 
Produced in the world is obtained from the 
upper San Juan. If the workings were system- 
atically carried on a much larger quantity might 
be extracted. Its price in Novita is about 12s. 
per ounce troy. The bed of the river San Juan 
and its principal tributaries must contain a 
large quantity of gold. Concessions have re- 
cently been granted for working these rivers, 
and Mr. White has no doubt that success will 
attend the operations if properly and practically 
carried out. The Patia is the only river north 
of the line, which, after traversing extensive 
valleys to the east (or inside of) the western 
Cordillera of the Andes, breaks through this 
mountain range and finds its way to the Pacific. 
The strait of Minama is in itself quite a re- 
markable feature in the Patia valley. The river 
Patia at this point drains a wide area of coun- 
try, and receives an abundant supply of water 
from the snowy ranges of the central Andes ; 
its volume is many times greater than that of 
the Thames at Richmond. The river, before 
entering the strait, comes to rest in an immense 
pool, surrounded by cliffs of slate rock, from 
which it finds an exit through a cleft 
which is not more than twelve feet 
wide, and through which the water moves 
with a barely perceptible current. This 
fissure, therefore, must be of great depth. 
Coal of excellent quality is abundant through- 
out the upper Patia valley. Copper mines are 
found near San Pablo. The river Patia itself is 
rich in gold, and in the dry season the negroes 
wash out a considerable quantity. The route 
by which travelers usually enter the country is 
by way of the port of Barranquilla, at the mouth 
of the Magdalena river. Steamers run up the 
river as far as Honda, and at Nare the road to 
the interior of Antioquia branches off. Five 
days' journey from Nare on mule back brings 
the traveler to Medellin, and this route is cer- 
tainly the right one to follow if the State of 
Antioquia is to be visited. A railway is in 
course of construction by Mr. Cisneros from 
Puerto Berrio on the Magdalena to Medellin, but 
only about thirty miles have been opened, and 
the rest of the route is traversed by a mule 
road about as long as that from Nare. The port 
of Buenaventura, on the Pacific coast, is called 
at twice a month by the English steamers from 
Panama. A good mule road leads from the port 
to Cali, in the Cauca valley, and a railroad is 
being constructed also by Mr. Cisneros, follow- 
ing more or less the same line. Fi'om Buena- 
ventura to Cordoba, a distance of twelve miles, 
the railway is now open, and at the latter 
place mules have to be hired. A day and a 
half's riding brings one to Cali, and from this 
city any part of the State of Cauca may be 
reached by mule roads. 

In estimating the practical importance of 
those districts of Colombia, of which Mr. 
White's paper treats, it should be borne in mind 
that Colombia is, with the exception of Chili, 
the best governed of the South American repub- 
lics. Property is thoroughly respected, the 
laws are fairly administed, foreigners are wel- 
comed and protected, and every inducement is 
held out to attract foreign capital. 



Crystallization ok Wrought Iron. — A 
correspondent of Science writes : "An iron 
contractor told me the other day that he was 
called as an expert in a case where the wrought 
iron strap of the walking beam of a steamboat 
broke and injured some one. The broken strap 
(about four by eight inches, I think,) was 
shown, and the interior found to be very badly 
crystallized — the worst case, my friend said, 
he ever saw. The exterior was of fair, ordi- 
nary texture. Afterwards, a part of the strap 
was cut off, sawn lengthwise into bars, and 
tested for tensile strength. All portions were 
rather weak, the highest resistance being but 
36,000 pounds, but the inner sections, where 
the iron was worst crystallized, were the 
strongest of all." 



Long Steel Plates. — Some long steel plates 
have been rolled by the Otis Iron and Steel 
company, of Cleveland, Ohio. The plates were 
50 feet 6 inches in length when sheared, 51 
inches wide in the center, and three-eighths of 
an inch thick, and the ingots from which they 
were rolled weighed 4,400 pounds each. They 
will be used in the construction of a large 
traveling crane. 



Juli 14, 1883] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



The Bj^jgijmee^ 



Underground Wires. 

Postmaster*! ieneraJ Fawcett, of England, in 
dwelling upon the advances made in under 
ground telegraphy by his department, statei 
that within a reditu of any four mil' 

1,388 I 
under ground and only ">i>0 above ground. The 
same district also contains about 000 miles <-t 
underground private wires. There 

! Km itil h ii ■■- tt itliin the 

unall an ile radius from 

the London pnstufHce, and uol one of these 

lid ti interfere with another. The 

local telegraph eysb 

ad il Llence is 

tui i ." th< nlation of the 

rhe In .iiial, and 

il inten option by the bi safe 

big 61 wires which, in certain localities, may at 

■ -, . noment be caused bi oi »j the For 

■nation of enormous icicles dragging the wires 

[round by tli.ii w.i it. It would ap 

I i "iii this that Aiii.-i t- tn conipanii are 

uou deprived ol their last refuge or excuse for 

Ailing the streets and covering the hi 

with poles and wires, and i is to be hoped that 

measures will be taken in the near future with 

■ -in] filing tin' laying of all \\ ires in 

cities under ground. 

It may be of interest to Btate that a number 

of men an- now employed in the constructi 

the underground connection between Marseilles 
add Paris, The cable is enclosed in a cast iron 
pipe which is laid nearlyaixfeetbelowthesurface 
of the ground, and which, at intervals of 560 
i provided with cast iron boxes. The 
tatter are bo constructed that they can be read- 
ily inspected when required, thus presenting 
in> very (treat difficulty in ca.se of repairs. The 
cost of the whole work is estimated at about 
$8,000,000. 



Tub Si k/ Canal.— The announcement of M. 
i I. Bepa that he will soon commence a second 
canal, a return line, close to the existing route, 
and that all the capital, 125,000,000 francs, has 
been subscribed by Frenchmen, does not meet 
what England demands, representation in a 
canal, claimed to be international, not French, 
for herself and other maritime powers, pro rata, 
to their shipping passing through. In the man- 
agement of the present canal, composed of 
thirty-three members, all are French, save 
three Englishmen, who are there by toleration, 
not by right. All the functionaries are French, 
and all are at the nod and heck of M. de Lesseps. 
'The canal dispute seems to he settling down 
into an anti-1'jiglish question, as a means of 
thwarting John Bull For not dividing his Egyp- 
tian gains with monsieur, who had backed out 
of the risks. In the administration of theexisting 
as well as in the execution of the second canal, 
the watchword seems to be: "Exclude the Eng- 
lish —the nation who holds nearly one-half of 
the stock and supplies by her shipping the four- 
fifths of the receipts." 



New Terms in Elbct&ic Engineering, — 

J ii following the development of electric engi- 
neering, all the world is learning new terms and 
new language. Words which three years ago 
either did not exist, or were understood only by 
men of science, are to-day in the common lan- 
guage of engineers and their workmen, to- 
morrow will be used by the general public. 
•'Electro-motive force "and "current," "volts" 
and "amperes," are becoming terms as well 
known as "pressure of water" or "cubic feet 
of gas;" and it is necessary that this should be 
so, as the time is fast approaching when the 
public will Hnd their quarterly bills for the sup- 
ply of electricity made out in "volts" and 
"amperes," and will have a right to sue their 
local electric company if their daily supply of 
" current " is insufficient, or is given at a wrong 
"electro-motive force." 



How to propel trains in tunnels is one of the 
mechanical or engineering problems of the day 
Eor which no very successful answer has yet 
been found. Ventillation even in short tunnels 
is exceedingly bad, and in our climate the pro- 
ducts of combustion make the air almost stifling 
in certain conditions of the weather. Any 
method of storing power which would not 
occupy more space or weight than an engine 
and boilers, and would be able to run for eight 
or ten hours continuously, would be one of the 
most valuable inventions of the age. Even the 
storage battery, which entails a loss of at least 
fifty per cent, could be made immensely useful 
if it were possible to charge the battery re- 
peatedly without injury to it. * 



The Great New York Bridge, recently 
opened between that city and Brooklyn, is not 
only the largest, all things considered, but also 
the most expensive structure of the kind ever 
built. The tubular iron Victoria bridge at Mont- 
real cost $7,000,000. The iron and steel bridge at 
St. Louis cost $9,000,000. The bridge from Eng 
land to the Fsle of Man, of tubular iron, cost 
about $3,000,000. There is not a stone bridge 
in London or Pans which cost over $4,000,000. 
The bridge at Omaha cost $-2,000,000; the one 
at Bismarck the same sum. The New York 
and Brooklyn bridge cont about $15,000,000. 



Useful Information, 



\ try delicate experiments 
nave been made to determine the so-called "re 
action time " in sensation - that is the time be- 
tween the moment ol excitation ol th< 
and the ' which the person indicates 

I. icious ol the 

n. Mr. BeauniB, ol Nancy, Prance, baa 
recently apught to measure the reaction time 
for Mm 11, or t" tell how long it takes to realise 
II after the excitant ol that 
sense has been applied to the olefacjtary nerves. 
Ii- gives in Gomjttes Rentlw n bible «<i the num- 

ttained « ith ten different sub 
Tlu-\ ran ■ rtj to seven hundredths of 

i for ammonia, and forty six foi acetic 
acid, to sixty-three for mint, and sixty-seven 
for carbolic acid. In the case ol musk, he was 
unable (notwithstanding repeated attempts) to 
fix pret iselj the moment ol the Bmell sensation, 
The numbers given show that the reaction time 

for smelling is lunger than that for toueh, sight 

and hearing. (In the author's own case, it is 
than foi touch.] Dr. Buccola, of Turin, 
nth made experiments on smell, with 

different apparatus, and gets results which agree 

in the main with those ■ >! M. I'.eaunis. 

Turkish Carpets.- It may startle some oi 

our readers tu learn that "real" Turkish carpets 
have been made in Germany for Turkey, hut 
such is the fact, at Least if we correct the ex- 
pression "Turkey,'" by explaining that their 
West ina t ii m is the Lite Turkish province and 
present kingdom of Uoumania. The German 
clement predominating at that Court, the ear- 
pets for a new summer palace, Sinai, have 
been ordered from a Saxon firm, who for some 
time past have been making imitation Turkey 
carpets. The designs were submitted to and 
selected by their Roumanian Majesties, and are 
Said to be of great splendor. One small carpet 
for a boudoir is in the now fashionable terra- 
cotta; another, b'O Square yards large, for a bed- 
room, has a cream ground with steel blue 
border; while a third, 80 square yards large, 
and weighing .")00 pounds, has a red ground with 
sage border, with a mixture of other colors. 
This sounds like carrying coals to Newcastle, 
but the price has no doubt decided the matter. 

To Restore Musty Fuh/k.— A correspondent 
of Th- Miller seeks information on the above 
subject, and receives the following reply: We 
do not believe on principle in adding any for- 
eign substance to Hour, and would not advise 
any one to, but if our correspondent wishes to 
experiment, we submit the following opinion, 
obtained from a well informed and reliable 
man: "Musty flour can be restored and im- 
proved by adding three parts of carbonate of 
magnesia to 70*0 parts of flour, mixing thor- 
oughly. Carbonate of magnesia cannot be 
called an adulterant. It has been specially rec- 
ommended by Professor Davy, on the ground 
that it improves the oolor of new and inferior 
flour, and increases the yield. Dr. Hassell, 
however, criticises this by saying that ' neither 
of these results, as far as the public are con- 
cerned, are in the least desirable. The in- 
creased yield simply means more water. ' 
Even so, if it is an improvement, it should be 
used by all means." 

Roofing LINEN. — A new covering material, 
called "roofing linen," has recently been intro- 
duced in Germany, which is about the thickness of 
common pasteboard, and consists of a layer of 
coarse linen between two layers of thin roll- 
paper. The cohesion of the three layers is ef- 
fected by an asphalt composition of special 
make, called "roofing paint.' It is stated that 
this paint should be freely applied to roofs im- 
mediately after their completion, and again about 
six weeks afterwards. This operation should, it 
would seem, be repeated every few years. The 
linen costs about lOd. to lid. per square yard, 
and the paint 10a. to lis. per cwt. Although 
this new method appears to have points which 
deserve commendation, a real estimate of its 
value cannot be formed until the material has 
been exposed to the test of several years' use. 

Something about Glucose. — A bushel of 
com weighing fifty-six pounds will yield be 
tween twenty-eight and thirty pounds of glu- 
cose or grape sugar, and hi adulterating sugar 
from eighteen to twenty per cent of the grape 
sugar is generally used. In Europe potatoes 
are generally used for the manufacture of glu- 
cose, and the manufacturers find larger profits 
than from corn. A plant called manioc, a na- 
tive of South and Central America, is said to 
produce fifty-six pounds of glucose to the bushel. 
As this plant yields over 500 bushels per acre, 
it is not improbable that manioc may be the 
"sugar cane" of the future. The so-called Bra- 
zilian arrow root and tapioca of commerce is 
made from the cassava or manioc plant. 



Good LEATHER PoLlSHj — A German journal 
gives the following leather polish : Mix "200 
parts of shellac with 1,000 of spirit — 95 per 
cent — in a well stoppered bottle. Keep in a 
warm place for two or three days, shaking fre- 
quently. Separately dissolve 25 parts of Mar- 
seilles soap in 875 of warm spirit — 25 per cent— 
and to the solution add 40 of glycerine. Shake 
well and mix with the shellac solution. To the 
mixture add five parts of nigrossin dissolved 
in 125 of spirit. Well close the vessel and 
shake energetically, and then leave the mixture 
in a warm place for a fortnight. 



Coppeh ok Ikon sob Brewing Coppebr.— 
According to the Engineer I London) there is 
a strong prejudice in England against the use 
of any metal but copper in the construction of 
brewing ooppers. On the continent they are 
often made of iron. It is thought by some that 

Oi tlie latter is liable to impart a dark 

color to the worts, bul • the Engineer, 

is not the case, for the tannic acid of the hops 
at ••nee forme a coating of insoluble annate of 
in»n, which protects the metal Erom oxidation, 
and analyses made oi worts boiled in iron prove 
that they do not contain more iron than 
worts- boiled in copper vessels contain of cop 
per; in fact, says the Brewer* 1 Quetrdian, un- 
less copp i i kept absolutely clean, it soon cor 
rodes and dissolves to an appreciable extent in 
a Blight 1) acid tluid like beer wort. 



A Lost sYrt Discovered (*).- A technical ex- 
ays: The art of making Vase bfurrhina, 
the famous glass work of Egyptian or Tyrian ori- 
gin, which was lost for 2,000 years, has at last 
been discovered, and this glass is now being 
made and introduced as centers for decoration 
and for panels, tiles, etc, In the restoration of 
tins Lost art, wc have a deeurating material 
which, from its adaptability and beauty will be 
much sought for. This revival, which com- 
menced at Murara, has spread to this country, 
and it is understood that a factory for the man- 
ufacture of this glass ifl to be started iii Chi- 
cago. 



BrICK OF Cork. —At the Nuremberg exhibi- 
tion was shown a novel use of bricks of corks. 
These bricks have only been used for building 
purposes on account of their lightness and iso- 
lating properties, but they are also employed as 
a covering for boilers, and are said to excel even 
asbestos in preventing the radiation of heat. 
They are stated to be very cheap, being pre- 
pared of small corks, refuse and isolating ce- 
ment. At Nuremberg, the application of cork 
bricks was largely shown. The usual size of 
cork bricks is I0x4fx2i inches. 



ASPHALT Bricks. — Bricks impregnated at a 
high temperature with asphalt are being suc- 
cessfully used in Berlin for street pavement. 
By driving out the air and water the bricks will 
take up fifteen or twenty per cent of bitumen, 
and the porous, brittle material becomes dura- 
ble' and elastic under pressure. The bricks are 
then put endways on beton bed and with hot 
tar. The pavement has ' been laid down in a 
part of a thoroughfare where neither granite 
nor compressed asphalt had hitherto withstood 
the wear. 

Gtood Health, 



One Cause of Railroad Accidents. 

The most carefully compiled statistics inform 
us that about 1 ,400 railroad employes are killed 
in this country every year, and from S.000 to 
to 10,000 more or less injured. This great 
sacrifice of human life is not, as might at first 
thought be surmised, caused principally by the 
frequent collisions or derailment of trains, but 
by accidents in making up and handling trains 
at stations. The loss is nearly all confined to 
brakemen or station train helpers ; and the 
opinion is expressed by good railroad authority, 
that avery large portion of these accidents might 
be avoided by improved, or rather uniform 
methods of constructing cars. 

It is a very general impression that system 
and uniformity is the prevailing rule in that 
rjortion of practical mechanics, which relates to 
car construction, but such is not the fact. 
From a circular issued by the secretary of the 
Master Car Builders* Association it appears that 
the very opposite of uniformity is the rule 
among car builders for railroad companies. The 
master car builder of the Boston and Albany 
railroad says he has forty different kinds of 
brake heads and shoes, eleven of journal boxes, 
thirty-seven journal bearings, ten cast iron and 
five or six wrought iron draw bars, eight or ten 
different draw bar side castings, and a multi- 
tude of various other different parts of a car. 
The master car builder of the Baltimore and 
Ohio road reports sixty-five different kinds of 
journal bearings, and in eleven other articles in 
common use varieties numbering from twenty- 
five to six. And similar reports have been sent 
from other railroad authorities. 

This is a singular exhibit, and it would seem 
almost that human perversity and not mere 
chance, or individual convenience, had *pro- 
duced this wide and confusing diversity of con- 
struction. It is a matter which may well chal- 
lenge careful inquiry, not only of the associa- 
tion referred to, but of the general public as 
well. 

Trichinje.— J. E. Morris, M. D., in the 
Clinical Brief ', says, in regard to trichina? in 
swine, that it is a well established fact that the 
real source of infection iu swine lies entirely in 
tiie rat. A committee of Vienna physicians 
found in Moravia thirty-seven per cent of rats 
examined trichinous; in Vienna and its environs 
ten per cent, and in Lower Austria about four 
per cent. The well known voracity of the hog, 
and its special fondness for meat, cause it to 
feed upon the flesh and_excrements of other ani- 
mals infested witli these parasites, and especially 
rats and mice. To prevent trichinous swine it 
is highly important to cut off all the sources of 
disease in the diet of these animals. 



Power of the Imagination. 

That imagination may prove fatal, n 
fresh pro.d from "a case of fatal shock from 
supposed snak ■ bi! ' reported in the .i/.,/;. ,,: 
Press, April 25, 1883, bj Dr. C. R. Francis, 
Tlie patient, awakened from his sleep by some- 
thing creeping over his naked legs, immediate I , 
jumped to tlie conclusion that it was a eohr a . 
went into a state of collapse and died, though it 
was discovered, even before death, that the 
supposed cobra was a harmless li/ard. There 
is nu doubt but that a ven larg« portion of the 
sickne&G and death of adults might be warded 
off by a proper and determined exercise of the 
will power. 

A late number of [fall's .!--><nt>tl >,j Health, 
in dwelling upon this subject, remarks as fol- 
lows: To regain or recover health, persons 
should be relieved from all anxiety concerning 
diseases. The mind has power over the body, 
Km- a person to think he has a disease mil often 
produce that disease. This we see effected 
when the mind is intensely concentrated upon 
the disease of another. It is found in the ho* 
pital that surgeons and physicians who make a 
specialty of certain diseases are liable to die of 
it themselves, and the mental power is ao great 
that sometimes people die of diseases which 
they only have in imagination. We have seen 
a person seasick in anticipation of a voyage be 
fore reaching the vessel. Wc have known a 
person to die of cancer in the stomach when he 
had no cancer or any other mortal disease. ,\ 
blindfolded man slightly pricked in the arm, 
has fainted and died from believing that he was 
bleeding to death. Therefore, well persons, to 
remain well, should be cheerful and happy, and 
sick persons should have their attention drawn 
as much as possible from themselves. It is by 
their faith men are saved, and it is by their 
faith that men die. If he wills not to die, he- 
can often live in spite of disease, and if he has 
little or no attachment for life, he will slip 
away as easily as a child will fall asleep. Men 
live by their souls and not by their bodies. 
Their bodies have no life by themselves; they 
are only resources of life — tenements of their 
souls. The will has much to do in continuing 
the physical occupancy or giving it up. 



Tlie Nature oi Consumption. 

If a green bush is pulled up by the roots, and 
these roots are cut off close to the body of the 
bush, a good general idea may be had of the 
"air passages," if the bush is turned upside 
down, or the top to the earth, The end of the 
bush next to the ground will then represent the 
part of the throat where the voice organs are, 
the body of the bush the windpipe, the branches 
the bronchial tubes, and the leaves the lungs 
themselves; and as the leaves cover the branches 
from sight, so the lungs, which are nothing 
more than little bladders distended with air, 
hide the bronchial tubes. Here, then, are four 
distinct parts of a great apparatus, each differ- 
ent in locality, ami each locality the subject of 
a distinct disease, requiring different remedies 
and a different treatment. Liquid guano de- 
stroys the leaf, but gives life to the roots. 
Water eloes but little good if thrown over a tree, 
but saves it from dying if thrown on the ground 
about it. So what would benefit one part of 
the air passage might be wholly unavailing if 
applied to another part. What would cure a 
disease of the windpipe might destroy the lungs, 
or be perfectly useless. Thus showing how im- 
portant it is to know certainly what the disease 
is, and where it is located, hi reference to 
the great fountain of life, the breathing appa- 
ratus. — Journal of Health. 



Herehitakv Disease. — There is, strictly 
speaking, no such thing as hereditary disease. 
Children are not born diseased, however (some 
specific maladies excepted) much one or both 
parents are, but they are simply born with a 
predisposition to such parental malady. They 
are born with the material, with the producing 
cause, perhaps, but actual disease will no more 
occur unless exciting causes are applied, than 
powder would detonate without the aid of fire. 
The observant reader has often felt surprised 
at seeing robust, hearty children, of parents 
who were seemingly at not a great remove from 
the grave, and if rational care were taken of 
such children they would live to become healthy 
men and women. The practical lesson should 
be a hopeful diligence in the rearing of children 
of diseased parentage. The difference between 
the children; of healthy and diseased parents 
amounts to this : As to the latter, they have 
less capability of resisting the causes of disease, 
the consequence is a greater necessity for care- 
fulness; this necessity is often felt, and practi- 
cally attended to; tlie result is, that such per- 
sons are found living, scores of years after those 
have moldered in the grave, who, in priding 
themselves on having constitutions which noth- 
ing could hurt, could not be made to feel the 
need of carefulness, and, consequently, perished 
long before their prime. 



A recent cough will almost always yield to 
the following treatment within two or three 
days : Mix in a bottle four ounces of glycerine, 
two ounces of alcohol, two ounces of water, (jwg 
grains of morphine. Shake well. Dose for 
au adult, one to two teaspoonfuls every two or 
three hours. Half this quantity to children 
from ten to fifteen years. It is not safe to give 
it to infants or children under ten years of age. 



24 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 14, 1883 



J^iJf|K.cg 



SCIENTIFIC! §RESS; 



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lie 



A. T. DEWEY 



W. E, EWKR. 



DEWEY & CO., Publishers. 



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G. H. STRONG. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday Morning, June 14, 1883. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS.— Stampedes and Stock Gambling; The 
Forthcoming Report of the Director of the Mint; Special 
Students at the University; California Pump, 17. 
Passing Events; How Shall we Make Bricks without 
Straw; Production of Precious Metals in California in 
1S82; The Deer Law; Mining Gold Nuggets, 24. A 
New Governor, 25. 

ILLUSTRATIONS.— Modified Chinese Pump, 17. 
Horizontal Engine with Ball's Governor, 25- 

CORRESPONDENCE.- From Vulture to Preseott, 
Arizona, 18. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS-— A Portable Ingot 
Regenerator; A Chance for Inventors; Diffusion Engine; 
Tilings U> be Kept in Mind by Every Mechanic; In- 
creased Efficiency of Railways. A Mechanical Want; The 
Largest Agricultural Machine Shop, 19. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. — Molecular Vibra- 
tions; Filtering Distilled Water; Conversion of Nebulae 
into Stairs; Liquid liases and Solid Alcohol; Scintilla- 
tions of Stars as Affected by the Aurora Borealis; 
Trans miss-ion of Sound Through Rock; The Electro- 
Motive Force of Batteries; Phosphorescence in Animals, 
J9. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.-Sales at the San 
Francisco Stock Board, Notices of Meetings, Assess- 
ments, Dividends and Bullion Shipments, 20. 

MINING SUMMARY— From the various counties 
Of California, Nevada, Arizona, Idaho, .Montana, New- 
Mexico, Oregon and Utah, 20-1. 

THE ENGINEER.- Cnderground Wires; The Suez 
Canal; New Terms in Electric Engineering, 23. 

OSEFUL INFORMATION.-Nene Action; Turk- 
ish Carpets; To Restore Musty Flour; Roofing Linen; 
Something about Glucose; Good Leather Polish; Cop- 
per or Iron for Brewing Coppers; A Lost Art Dis- 
covered; Brick of Cork; Asphalt Bricks, 23. 

GOOD HEALTH.- One Cause of Railroad Accidents; 
Tricliinie; Power of the Imagination; The Nature of 
Consumption; Hereditary Disease, 23. 

NEWS IN BRIEF-On page 28 and other pages. 

MISCELLANEOUS. — .Natural Resources, 18. 
Metallin-gv of Nickel; .Mineral Resources of Columbia, 
22. 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Mining Machinery— Joshua Hendy Machine Works, 
Annual Meeting- Spring Valley Water Co., S. F. 
Hydraulic Machine Hoskin Bros., Marvsville. Cal. 



Passing Events. 

Save only such ordinary happenings as occur 
always and in every country, we have little of 
interest to place on record of the current week. 
On the credit side of the business ledger we 
have to enter many items, such as an active 
trade, a healthy labor market, favorable weather 
for maturing and gathering the great harvests 
of fruit and grain, good prices for our leading 
staples, uninterrupted public health, and a gen- 
eral prosperity. On the debtor side there is 
some little shortage of water in the mines, some 
shrinkage of the crops, a breath of political un- 
rest, with the usual number of accidents, dis- 
asters and mishaps to put down. Exempt from 
the tornadoes, floods, pestilence, drought, and 
the thousand other discomforting and death- 
dealing agencies that afflict other peoples, we of 
California pursue our vocations under halcyon 
skies, with little to disturb or make us afraid. 
Multitudes of strangers are this summer visit- 
ing oar State, a far larger number than ever be- 
fore; the most of them coming not more to view 
our scenery and enjoy our climate than to es- 
cape the miseries and dangers to which they 
would be exposed were they to remain at home. 
These people travel a long way and expend 
much money for the sake of seeing and briefly 
enjoying what with us are matters of everyday 
life. Truly, we are in some respects a favored 
people. 

Mi>i;k than 3,000 persons have perished by 
disasters on sea and land the present year. 



"How Shall We Make Bricks Without 
Straw?" 

When, in the course of weekly events, it be- 
comes necessary for us to make up the mining 
summary for this paper, we sometimes experi. 
ence not a little trouble hi accomplishing that 
task. In preparing this summary we depend, 
as will be seen, wholly On our exchanges from 
the mining districts for the material wherewith 
to make up the same. Now, so it is, these ex- 
changes come to us sometimes quite barren of 
items adapted to our purpose, leaving us no alter- 
native but to omit from our columns any notice 
of mines and mining affairs in that particular 
locality. This is a damage to the section of conn- 
try so ignored and a disappointment to us. 
We might, it is true, adopting the plan of 
some eastern journalists, draw on our imagina- 
tion for matter descriptive of these mines, and 
so furnish to the world some entertaining read- 
ing: might reproduce, for example, and further 
embellish the pleasing fiction lately promul. 
gated in that quarter about two of our noted 
mining magnates, John P. Jones and Alvinza 
Hayward — relating how the latter, while en- 
gaged in developing a gold mine, having ex- 
hausted his means, applied to Jones for as- 
sistance; whereupon something like the follow- 
ing colloquy took place: .Jones, loquitur — 
"Well, yes, I would like to help you out, my 
boy, only I am myself about strapped, cleaned- 
out and done for; only got a little dab cached 
there under the hearth — not more than a mil- 
lion dollars or so, but you are welcome to that 
if it will do you any good." "Any good! 
well, I should rather say ! But, then, I don't 
like to rob you of your bottom dollar and leave 
you teetotally dead-broke and essentially gone 
in." "Oh! take it old fellow — take it and pitch 
in. If you make a strike, good for yen. If you 
lose it, dang the difference. Always like to 
' grub-stake ' an old friend when I have it in 
my power." Sequel: Alvinza, who is a hopeful, 
persevering chap, resumes work, strikes a bo- 
nanza of a hundred millions or more, all solid 
gold, which he hastens to share with his liberal 
friend. Jones, considering this an imputation 
on his generosity, rejects the offer, whereupon 
a duel ensues, 'and both parties *are killed. 
The above account of this sad affair differs, we 
admit, somewhat from that given in the Kast. 
But our version is the better of the two, in that 
it is more highly flavored, while it adheres 
equally close to the facts of the case. 

This, as we said, might furnish a bit of enter- 
taining reading, at least to that class of persons 
abroad who have come to relish any kind of 
lollypop ladled out to them by Bret Harte, Sam 
Clemens and other writers of the sensational 
and Munchausen school ; but its publication 
would hardly be fulfilling the mission of the 
Press, which is to furnish the largest amount 
of trustworthy information possible, in relation 
to the mines on this coast. 

With the exception noted, these our brethren 
of the press do constantly much good service of 
one kind and another. They guard vigilantly 
many public interests— no week being suffered 
to pass but they make occasion to cudgel the 
bloated aristocrat, take a whack at the pauper 
immigrant, or go for the hated mongol in our 
midst. Save in the particular mentioned, these 
papers do not lack variety. They discourse of 
all things under the sun and on it — sacred and 
profane, wise and otherwise. They hold forth 
on the origin and descent of man; give us dis- 
sertations on physical improvement, morals, 
politics and religion; talk about love, free and 
platonic, and, diving deep into the abyss of 
metaphysics, drag thence the most abstruse 
questions and subject them to a hebdomadal 
airing. 

Now protoplasm is good, and so is muscular 
Christianity, which latter the border clergy 
might, perhaps, practice to advantage, seeing a 
set-to with gloves might sometimes draw where 
pulpit eloquence fails. There is virtue in all 
these things, but in this age we cannot get 
along without the mining items. We yearn for 
these. Our desire is of the precious metals, 
mines, quartz-mills, smelters, etc. We would 
know how much bullion, and no more, John 
Smith has taken out the past week or month, 
as the case may be. Though often told, we 
like to hear the story rehearsed of the Copper 
Gong, the Golden Harp and the Silver Lyre. 
(Let the compositor be careful to spell this last 
word right. ) 

Along about the occurrence of our national 



holiday we did not expect much mining news 
through these our usual channels of informa- 
tion. - But now that the " Fourth of Independ- 
ence " is past, the crisis over, and the country 
safe, we indulge the hope that our cotemporaries 
in the mineral regions will make amends for 
former shortcomings ; even those in the past 
most remiss managing to slip into their columns 
every week or two a few lines about the mines, 
the miners, the millmen, and the smelters in 
their vicinage. How, without the aid of these, 
our friends in the upper country, can we our- 
selves get out a good paper ? How, adopting 
the language of the ancient Israelite, shall we 
be able to make bricks without straw '! 



The Deer Law. 

Effort was made by the last Legislature to 
guard against the slaughter of the deer for 
their hides which has been pursued heretofore 
in a most wanton manner in some of the north - 
ern counties. Scores of carcasses have been re- 
ported abandoned and the slayers have pressed 
onward on their murderous course. It is to be 
hoped that the present law, aiming to prevent 
such outrages, will prove effective. 

It will be well for the information of all who 
contemplate deer hunting to publish the law as 
it stands at present, to wit: 

626 * * Every person who, between the 
first day in November in each year and the 
first day of July in the following year, hunts, 
pursues, takes, kills or destroys any male deer 
or buck is guilty of a misdemeanor. Any per- 
son in the State of California, who has in his 
possession any hides or skins of any deer, elk 
or antelope or mountain sheep, killed between 
the first of November and the first of July is 
guilty of a misdemeanor. Every person who 
shall at any time in the State of California, 
hunt, pursue, take, kill or destroy any spotted 
fawn is guilty of a misdemeanor. Every per- 
son who shall take, kill or destroy any of the 
animals mentioned in this section at any time 
unless the carcass of such animal is used or pn 
served by the person taking or slaying it, or is 
sold for food, is guilty of a misdemeanor, 
Every person who shall buy, sell," offer for sale, 
transport, or have in his possession any deer 
from which evidence of sex lias been removed 
or any of the aforesaid game at any time when 
it is unlawful to kill the same, as provided by 
this an<l subsequent sections, is guilty of a mis- 
demeanor. 

Mining Gold Nuggets. 

From the Baughart mine, situate twelve miles 
northwest of Shasta, there was brought to this 
city last week a lot of gold, consisting of nug- 
gets, weighing each a pound or more. This 
gold, which occurs in a crystallized form, is met 
with in bunches, connected by vein mattei*. 
It is broken from the containing gangue, 
with hammers, very little of the ore here being 
subjected to mill process, what is so treated 
being worked in arrastres. The most of the 
gold occurring so at intervals, rentiers produc- 
tion somewhat irregular, though, in the long 
run, exceedingly profitable. This mine has been 
worked for the past twenty years, and has 
yielded large annual returns. As the gold bear- 
ing formation runs clear through the mountain, 
it is thought profitable operations may be kept 
up here for an indefinite period. The mine is 
being worked after a manner that ought to have 
large following, the management being noted for 
economy, system, and efficiency. Mr. F. M. 
Stocking, the superintendent, is a careful and 
experienced miner, and withal a man of the 
greatest probity, a very important qualification 
in the conduct of a property like this. 



tematically conducted, witli the result of dis- 
coveries of importance being made. 

During the year the following dividends were 
paid by California companies: 



Companies. 


Divi- 
dends. 


Amounts. 


Black Bear (Quartz 

Bodie Consolidated 


4 

4 

12 

i 
1 

12 
1 
9 

c 

li 

IS 


331,500 
100,000 
120,000 
10,000 
12,500 


Bulwer Consolidated 


Great Western i^uieksilver 




6,250 
1)0,000 
20;00l 
30,000 
50,800 
15,000 


Napa Consolidated Quicksilver, . . 
New York Hill.. 

San Francisco Copper 


Standard Consolidated. . . 








Totals 


7.5 


i *1,449,900 



This is nearly $400,000 less than was paid in 
seventy-two dividends in 1881. 

Sixty-eight mines in fourteen counties arc 
reported to have levied 121 assessments, and 
called upon the stockholders for $1,547,467, as 
against $2,237,850 in 1881. 

I have estimated the total production of the 
.State at $17,645,000,- of which 16,800,000 is gold 
and SS45,000 silver. This was produced by the 
several counties approximately as follows: 



Coivrir. 



Cold. 



Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo , , 

Kern , 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Mariposa 

Merced 

Mono 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino. . 

San Diego 

Sau Luis Obispo. . 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Stanislaus. 

Tehama 

Trinitv 

Tulare 

Tuolumne .. . 

Yuba 

Totals. 



'-"J 1,1 Hll I 

1,500,000 

650,000 

670,000 

3,000 

80,000 

600,000 

80,000 

100,1100 

'220,000 

260,000 

100,000 

17,000 

250,000 

10,000 

2,200,000 

3,600,000 

800, 

1,250,000 
400,000 
-20,000 
1)10,00(1 

5,000 

300,000 

1,100,000 

7*1,000 
80,000 
10,000 

600,000 
5,000 

-100,1100 

750,000 
S16,SUO,00l 



130,000 
20,000 

20, 

24,000 

4,000 



380,000 

10,000 



si4'i,ni.)0 



To till. 

£30,000 

1,500,000 

650,000 

070,000 

3,000 

80,000 

600,000 

80,000 

loo.ooo 

350,000 

280,000 

120,000 

41,000 

•254,000 

10,000 

2,580,000 

3,510,000 

800,000 

1,250,000 

400,000 

170,000 

100,000 

5,000 
380,000 

1,100,000 

720,000 

!)5,000 
lo.ooo 

600,000 

7,000 

400,000 

750,000 

817 ,645:000 



Production of Precious Metals in Cali- 
fornia in 1882.* 

This State has maintained the second place in 
the list of gold and silver-producing States and 
Territories. There was, however, a diminution 
in the yield of the precious metals of about 
§1,800,000 from the production of 1881. 

This was largely due to a falling otf of up- 
wards of §900,000 in the production of the 
Standard Consolidated mine at Bodie. The 
gravel mines, too, yielded less, as they had not 
recovered from the depressing effects of litiga- 
tion on the debris question, which at one time 
threatened not only to cripple the operations of 
some of the chief producing mines, but in some 
instances to cause a total suspension. 

In sections of country where suits were pend- 
ing, capital was withheld from engaging in new 
mining enterprises, and even the quartz mines 
were affected to some extent. 

In the southern part of the State more ac- 
tivity was manifested than for some years past. 
Old mines were reopened and prospecting sys- 



This estimate of the gold product of Califor- 
nia in 1SS'2 is nearly §1,500,000 higher than the 
estimate of statisticians on the Pacific coast; 
but after a careful revision of the reports from 
mines and districts, and of the statements if 
the amount and sources of the gold received at 
the San Francisco and Carson mints, I am con- 
strained to adhere to the figures I have given. 

The value of the gold coined at these mints 
during the year was $29,929,525, of which $2,- 
441,956 was gold bullion belonging to the Gov- 
ernment in those mints at the beginning of the 
year in excess of the amount at its close, leav- 
ing $27,487,559 coined from bullion deposited 
during the year. 

Of the latter, §26,481 was United States gold 
coin, old plate, jewelry, etc., and §4,504,004 
foreign gold coin and bullion. Assuming that 
all of the foreign gold coin and bullion imported 
during the year at San Francisco, amounting to 
14,748,766, came to the mints and was also 
made into coin, there would remain §'22,712,300 
gold of domestic production used in the coinage, 
which must have been deposited at the San Fran- 
cisco and the Carson mints from the States and 
Territories sending their bullion to these mints. 
From the mint records and the reports from 
private refiners, it appears that all of the do- 
mestic bullion received at San Francisco and 
Carson, except §81,770, came from the Pacific 
States and Territories, i. e., California, Nev- 
ada, Oregon, Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, and Wash- 
ington, and that these States and Territories 
sent to the Atlantic coast, also, gold bullion to 
the amount of §612,524. It is evident, there- 
fore, that the production of the Pacific States 
and Territories should equal the. gold bullion 
used in coinage that must have been received 
from them — §22,630,540— and the amount they 
sent to the Atlantic seaboard— §612,524 — a total 
of §23,243,064. Their total production as esti- 
mated in the general table, is placed at §22,- 
570,000, showing, if the official records are to 
be relied upon, that more than one-half million 
dollars of gold bullion was delivered at San 
Francisco aud Carson from the Territories bor- 
dering upon the Pacific States and Territories; 
or that the total production of the latter during 
the year must have been greater, rather than 
less, than the amount I have credited to them. 



This statement of the production of precious metals in 
California is from an advance sheet of the Report of H. 
C. Bun-hard, Director of the l r . S. Mint, for the year 1S82. 



Durability ov Buildinc Stone. — To deter- 
mine the value of building stone, some one grim- 
ly suggests that a meditation among the tombs 
is a very good tiling, and a capital article on the 
' 'life" of stone used for public or private struct- 
ures could not fail to be written upon what 
might be observed in humble village graveyards 
or splendid city cemeteries. In far fewer years 
than most people imagine, monuments erected 
to last to the resurrection are in ruins— before 
the grandsons of " the poor inhabitants below " 
are dead. Nature will allow just as little waste 
material as she can help. 



THE American railroad interests in Mexico, 
have all been consolidated. 



July 14, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



A New Governor. 



An invention relative t«> steam engine gov- 
ts been made by K. Ball, of tin- Ball 




an arm which is keyed t*« the shaft. The fixed 

aim baa a stud at c:i ah extremity, on which a 

lever is placed, shown in Kigs. I and 3. 

The inner ends of til attached to 

the weights and spring 

the onter ends ai 

by link* to the arm of the 

pulley or driving wheel, and 

are tin- means by « hii.h the 

wheel iteelJ is driven. Thus 



supply in the usual manner. The sei 
eccentric has rrounding the shaft, 



from Outside. 



F*g. 1. View of Govern 
Co., of Erie, Pa., which introduces 
m iVit will strike most of 01 ta an en- 

tirely ncn pi ; heory fur their a< lion. 

Mm Ball govei \ instead oi depending on 

variations in the speed ■•[ the engine for secnr 
ueral uniformity, takes an entirely new 
departure, and makes the variations in the load 
the means for regulating the sped. It is gen- 
erally admitted that the theory of an engine 
governor oi the ordinary type in defective. 
These goi ei nors only act when the speed 
changes, and, although the best of them act 
within exceedingly small limits, there must be 
certain irregularities of motion in order that 
they may act at all. Theoretically, the ordi* 
nary governors cannot keep an engine at a uni- 
form speed under wide changes of load. They 
act only within certain limits, which are largely 
a matter of adjustment. Usually, if the gov- 




i for power to 
let. In external form, as we have said, 

o familiar appear- pn mg hole in thi 

Ptg. 1 is a view from the outside : ;( ,,„t 

_', a view 
from the inside. Kig. .'i 
the inside with the 
ics detached, while in 
ppear 
in their proper relations . 





Fig. 3. Governor "With Eccentrics. 



governor is placed between the engine and 
the work which is Vicing performed, and 
that it not only transmits all the power, but 



joint. The main eccentric lias an 
shaft opening, and is suspended by 
mi an arm, giving it a pendulum-like 



oblong 
a pin 

motion 




Fig. 2. Inside View. 

which covers the oblong shaft opening and 
keeps botb the Lu contact. The two 

weights are suspended in such a position that 

..I --iisi_.il forci by the spring, 

and the resultant of the i pposing forces is trans- 
mitted through ball and socket joints to the ec- 
centrics. 

The speed diagrams A and C, were taken 
in a rather novel manner. A weight held by a 
spring in the balance wheel revolved with it, 
and by centrifugal force, aided by gravity, vi- 
brated in a vertical direction at each revolu- 
tion. The extent n[ these vibrations measured 
the speed of the engine. Of course when tin- 
weight was over the shaft, gravity drew it to- 
ward the center, and when in the opposite di 
rection gravity drew it from the center. This 
constant vibration corresponding with the revo- 
lutions is what is represented by the nearly 
vertical lines, the horizontal motion of the pa* 

c 




A." Speed Diagram from a Common Governor. Load Thrown on and off. 

is also constantly weighing the power trans- 
mitted. This weighing of the load is made to 
act directly on the steam supply through the 






Fig. 4 

ernor is very sensitive to changes of speed, it 
will lie unstable in its action, causing an inter 
mittent Mow of steam to the engine, if it is a 
throttling governor, or irregular cutting 
off if it is a cut off governor. It will be 
always "hunting," as the engineering 
plirase goes. Usually the adjustment is 
made so that as they move to increase 
the steam supply, they meet a con- 
stantly increasing resistance to fui-ther 
motion. This gives them stability of 
action, but makes the total change of 
speed between full load and entirely 
empty, a very considerable amount. 
The new theory which Mr. Ball devel- 
oped in the construction of his governor 
is to bring about changes in the point of 
cut-off, or in the supply of steam, by the 
changes of load itself, instead of by 
changes in the speed of the engine. As 
the change of load is what causes vari- 
ation in the speed of the engine, it evi- 
dently should determine the amount of 
steam admitted to the cylinder. This 
theory is eminently a rational one. 
The Ball Engine Co. send us the two 
diagrams, A and C, which we publish 
herewith, illustrating the action of one 
of these governors, and the results 
attained arc certainly quite remarkable. 
Before speaking of them at length, how- - 
ever, the construction of the governors ;^ 
must be mentioned. The cuts show the ^ 
form of construction used for single-valve -^ 
automatics, hi which the governing is ^ 

affected by moving the eccentric across 
the shaft. To understand the applica- 
tion of the tlreory to a form of governor 
which at first glance is of quite a common 
form, a close inspection of the cuts is necessary. 
The pulley itself is made to form a part of the 
governor, and is mounted loosely on the hub of 



Fig. 5. "C" Speed Diagram from a Ball Governor. Load Thrown on and off. 



backward and forth across the shaft. Mounted 
loosely on the shaft outside of this eccentric is 
a secondary eccentric, the ring of which engages 




HORIZONTAL ENGINE WITH BALL'S GOVERNOR 

a stud in the side of the main eccentric, so that larger engines of their owi 
as this secondary eccentric oscillates forward 



eccentric. The weight and springs provide the 
necessary stability, and the resistance of the 
load is only introduced in sufficient quantity to 
correct the inherent defects of all governors (le- 



per, which was constant, gh ing each line a 
slight inclination. A pencil attached to the 
weight drew the lines. The diagrams were all 
taken from the same engine under 
the same condition of load, which con- 
sisted of a wheel submerged in water, 
so arranged that it could be lifted out 
or entirely submerged without interfer- 
ing with the motion of the engine. The 
engine itself could be controlled cither 
by the new governor or, at pleasure, 
by one of the common form, which was 
one ol the most popular in the market 
and highly esteemed for its excellence. 
Diagram A is a sample of the best work 
which it could produce under the widest 
changes of load. Vn each diagram, 
near the middle, the load was suddenly 
thrown on. In A, this point is clearly 
shown by a marked falling off in the 
speed. 

One of these engines, 9x12, can be seen 
running at the establishment of Tatum & 
Bowen, 25 to 31 Main street, who are 
the agents for this coast. 

It is -making 220 revolutions, and runs 
without any perceptible variation in 
speed, though the load is very irregular. 
It indicates forty horse power. 

The manufacturers are making a 
specialty of this engine and also of a 
high speed engine with the same govern- 
ing device. 

A 11x12 high speed engine, making 300 
revolutions, has just been shipped to 
run a dour mill of 125 barrels per day. 
It will make 300 revolutions. Tatum & 
Bowen will apply the governor to the 
manufacture. 



The President has given up the trip to Yel- 
and backward on the shaft, the main eccentric h wstone Park. He says it will have to wait 
is made to swipg and thereby vary the steam | until he is a private citizen. 



26 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 14, 1883 



|lletalijwapjjj^__ 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

No. 23 STEVENSON STREET, 

Near First and Market Streets, S. P. 

ESTABUsmiD, 1869. 0. A. Ldokhabpt, Manager. 

Orea Worked by any Prooess. 
Ores Sampled, 
Assaying in all its Branches. 
Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Waters, Eto. 
Working Tests (Practical) Made, 
Plana and Specifications furnished for the 
most suitable proceas for working Ores. 

Special attention paid to Examinations of 
Minos, planB and reports furnished. 

C. A. LUCKHABDT & CO, 
(Formerly Huhn & Luckhardt.) 
Minlner Engineers and Metallurgists 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO,. 

IHPORTBRB OP AND DKALBRS US 

Assayers' Materials, 

MINE and MILL SUPPLIES, 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS AND CHEMICALS, DRUG- 
GISTS' GLASSWARE AND SUNDRIES, Etc. 

118 and 120 Market Street, and 15 and 17 
California St., San Francisco. 

We would call the attention of Assayera, Chemists, 
Mining Companies, Milling Companies, Prospectors, etc., 
to our full stock of Balances, Furnaces, Muffles, Cruci- 
bles, Scorifiers, etc., including, also, a full stock of 
Chemicals. 

Having heen engaged in furnishing these supplies since 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast, we feel 
confident from our experience we can well Buit the de- 
mand for these poods both as to quality and price. Our 
New Illustrated Catalogue, with prices, will be sent on 
application. 

jOTOur Gold and Silver Tables, showing the value per 
o unce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and valuable 
tables for computation of assays in grains and grammes, 
will be sent free upon application. AgentB tor the Patent 
Plumbago Crucible Co., London, England. 

JOHN TAYLOB & OO. 

Q. KOSTBIfc H. KUSTBfc 

METALLURGICAL WORKS, 

S18 Pine St., (Basement), 
Corner of Lcidesdorff Street, - SAN FRANCISCO 

Ores Sampled and Assayed, and TestB Made by any 



Assaying and Analysis of Orea, Minerala and Waters. 
Mines examined and reported on. 
Piactical Instruction given in Treating Ores by ap- 
proved procossoB. 

G. KTJSTEL & CO., 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgist 



OTTOKAR HOFMANN, 

Metallurgist and Mining Engineer. 

Erection of Leaching and Chlorination Works a 
specialty. AddreBS, 

Cor. Fifth and Bryant Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



WM. D JOHNSTON, 
ASSAYER AND ANALYTICAL CHEMIST, 

113 Leidesdorff Str-eet, 

Bet. California and Sacramen'.o SU, SAN FRANCISCO. 

ASSAYING TAUGHT. 

iarPeraonal attention insures Correct Returns. Ha 



THOS. PRICE'S 

Office and Chemical 
Laboratory, 

524 Sacramento St., S. F. 



EDWARD BOOTH, 

Chemist and Assayer, 

No. 110 Sutter St., S. F. * 



FLOURNOY'S ANTI-SCALE COMPOUND 

FOR STEAM BOILERS. 

Will ( ffectually rid of scale any steam boiler, and, as 
ong aB used, prevent its accumulation. Especially 
recommended to parties owning THRESHING MA- 
CHINES. Is entirely free from acids, acting as a pre- 
Bervator of iho iron and a lubricant. Is recommended 
by the "Scientific American" as the best known. Haa 
been used in the U. S. Mint of San Kranjisco for the 
past two years. Send all orders to 

GEO. FLOtTRNOY, JR., 

220A McAllister St., - San Francisco 
George Flournov of the fi of Flournoy, Mhoon & 
Flournoy, Attorneys-at-Law, bove address. 

0. H. AARON/" 

AMII PRACTICAL METALLURGIST, 

-AUTHOR 01-' 

"Testing and "Working Silver Ores; Leaching Gold 
and Silver Ores." 

Mines Examined as to Practical Value 

Wdii s PINAL, ARIZONA, 



INGERSOLL ROCK DRILLS 




Mining Machinery. 

For Catalogue^ Estimate?, Etc., address 

Berry & Place Machine Company, 

PAKKB <fe LACY, Proprietors.) 

8 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Established 1864. 

THE MOREY & SPERRY MINING MACHINERY CO.. 

[Saccetaors fo MOSEY & SPISRRY.J 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Mine and Mill Machinery 



W1BEROOMS : 
J3 «fc 94 liberty St., New York. 




WORKS t 

Newburg, - New York. 

The Foundry and Machine Shop iih..-ii.g ttcon eufcrxed we are i:c w prepared ' . 
ke from the incst improved nations QUARTZ aid STAMP M ILLS cojipleie, ior 
rking GOLD and STLVEK ORES. 



MET'S IMPROVED NLM&, 

For WET or DRY Crushing. 

SIMPLE, EFFICIENT and DURABLE. 



MOREY'S IMPROVED PULVERIZER, 

s teel SHOES and DIES fo r Stamps, and Mine and Mill Supplies. 

1 ' ' * ' ' "^ •..-..-- Information and Estimates . ... 

THE MOREY &. SPERRY 



MINERS' HAND ROCK DRILL. 

Address, 



The "Balls revolve Horizontal! v -without notion, 
5 ft. size, weight 7.0CO lbs,, and does more work than 15 
Stamps, 3 ft. size, weigh 3,000 lbs. 

Ooncenti aMng Mihs, Rock Breakers, Amalgamating 
Pans nd Separators, R< astir g Furnaces, Hoisting and 
Pumping Machinery, Engines a 1 d Builers , any size 
required, Hydraulic Giants a nd Pipe, Ore Cars, Ore 
Buckets, Safely Cages. The Hand Power Two-stamp 
Mill, weight 280 lbs. THE EUREKA WIRK ROPE 
TRAMWAYS, Uoncentiating Riffles for Mills and By 
draulic Sluices. 
Agents for IMLAY ORE CONCENTRATOR and fcae 
Estimates cheerfully given S en<l lor Catalogue. 

MINING MACHINERY CO. 



ANTI-SCALE COMPOUND 

Manufactured by RICKARD & DURDEN. 

We guarantee that, with proper use, fDis Compound "will remove end prevent all 

INCRUSTATION IN STEAM BOILERS. 



Ten years trial, in widely separated lo caliiiee, has demonstrated the value of this invention, and its applicability 
to different qualities of water. References cheerfully furnished to anyone wishing 1 same. 

«rTEN POUND SAMPLE BOX FURNISHED FREE ON APPLICATIONS 

BERRY & PLACE MACHINE CO., Sole Agents, 

No. 8 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



READY FOR DELIVERY. 

LATHES, DliJLLING MACHINES, PLANING MACHINES 

And Other Machine Tools. 
STRONG, DURABLE AND SUPERIOR TO IMPORTED MACHINES. 

Wheel Cutting to Order. 
SAN FRANCISCO TOOL CO., - - 21 Stevenson St., S. F. 



Mining imm. 



B. SALAZAR, 

Mining Engineer and Metallurgist. 

Graduate of Kreitferg' and Olausthal Royal Mining 
Schools, Germany. 

ILL FURNISH ACCURATE REPORTS ON MINKS 
11 the United Status and Mexico. Also, act as 



w 



CONSULTING ENGINEER 



To Convpar 



all METALLURO 
MATTERS. 



Starting up Tunnels, Smelting 1 or Leaching 
Works a Specialty. 



Several years' I'm 
co. Would take cl 

TEMPORARY OT' 

San Francisco, Cal. 



oal Expe 



in Arizona and MeX- 
reduction works. 



;<'l('l<: with Kustel & Co., 318 Pine St., 



Luthkr Wagonek, C. E., M. E. 

John Hays Hammond, M. E. 

Wagoner & Hammond, 
MINING ENGINEERS, 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, and 

Alamos, So o r a, Uflex co 
Special attention to tho det-itrmug and uuiisiruca >n of 
Concentration Works for f II o ep. Gradual reduction by 
rolling i.opact, c ahSification by air currents, improved 
oninted boxes and corrugated rubber and iron Rittinger 
tables, 

i®"Correspondence and samples tolicited from parties 
having low-grade properties. 

MINES REPORTED UPON. 



GEORGE MADEIRA, 

Geologict and Mining Engineer. 



Reports on mines furnlBhed; Estimates of Machinery 
etc. Special attention paid to the examination of mines 
in Mexico, California, Arizona and New Mexico. Thirty 
years in the mines of the above States. 

SI HABLA ESPANOLA I 
Address, care this office or SANTA CRUZ, CAL. * 



W.W.BAILEY, 

Mechanical Ei\gir\eer, 

Room 22, Stock Exchange, S. F. 
Plans and Spec'flcations iarnished for Hoisting, Pump- 
ing, Mill, Mining and other Machinery. Machinery in- 
spected and erected. 



SCHOOL OF 

Practical, Civil, Mechanical and Min 
ing Engineering, 

SURVEYING, DBA WING AND ASSAYING, 
iA Post Street, San Francisco 

A. VAN DKR NAILtKN, Principal. 

Srcnd for fUrcuIfti" 

W. C. JOHNSON, Engineer, 

Fitcnburg, Mass., 

Engines, Mining and Railroad Macliiiiery aud SuDDlies 

PURCHASED ON COMMISSION. 

Correspondence Solicited. Cal fornia and Nevada Refe r- 
ences. Full advantages of falli-ig piices in Eastern 
markets secured our customers 



F. VON LEICHT, 
Mining and Civil Engineer. 

Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
OTReoorts. Surveys and Plana of Mines made._ff7 



"CLAYTON" 




AIR COMPRESSORS 

For CATALOGUES, ESTIMATES, Etc Address, 

CLAYTON STEAM PUMP "WORKS 

43 4 47 York St., BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

(Near Approach to New York & Brooklyn Bridge. ) 



San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works 

J. W. QUICK, Mantjfacturbb. 

Several first premiums receivt d 
for Quartz Mill Screens, and Per- 
forated Sheet Metals of ever; 
description. I would call special 
attention to my SLOT OUT and 
SLOT PUNCHED SCREENS, 
which are attracting much at- 
tention and giving unversal 
satisfaction. This is the only 
establishment on the coast de- 
voted exclusively to the manufac- 
ture of Screens. Mill owners using Battery Screens exten 
sively can contract for large supplies at favorable rates. 
Orders solicited and promptly attended to. 

32 Fremont Street. San Francisco. 




Engraving.; 



Supurior Wood and Metal Engrav- 
ing, Electrotyping and Stereotyp- 
_ ' ingdone at theofficeof theMmiNG 
y. SoiiiNr!?Ki Pastis, Sao fcVaonisa-i, a+ favorable r»t<* 



July 14, 1883.J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



o**xo^oo FRA8ER & CHALMERS. ^inoi S 

MANUFACTURERS OK IMPROVED AND APPROVED FORMS OF 



Having made extensive addi'luna to our Shops aud Machinery, we hxve now the LAKi.KST and UEhT AP- 
POINTED SHOPS in 'bo West. We are prepared to build from the Latest una Must Approved Patterns, 



QUARTZ MILLS 



For working fold and silver ores by wet or dry crushing. The Stetefeldt, Howell's Improved White, Bruut..u*o & 
Bruckner Furnaces, for working base ores. tloUry Dryers, Stetefeldt Improved Dry Kiln Furnaces. 

SMELTING FURNACES, 

Water Jacket., either Wrought or cut Iron, made In section, or one piece, either round, oblong, oval or square. Our 
pattern, nioet exleuaivo in u»e. SPECIAL FURNACES Fcm CiHThl: SSIELTISC. Slsff Pota and Care, impr.ivnl 
(oral. BajUaD and OopfMI U"uUU and Ladle*. Litharge Care und Pota, Cupel Furnace, and Care. 

TT^taXOrTlTT^aP* TWTaf^ T"rVTTO Large or Small (or rtat or mund ropo. DoubleCy 
HUlSlliMlJ .Eji^i XXJLJ^I XltJ al»o Corliss PuiuijIiik Kiiicliiua, iiixCtl, (or HoUtlnj- 

Wlre Rope, Safety Cages and any Size and Forms of Cars 

Principal Office and Works, Fulton and Union Sts., Chicago, Illinois. 



Frue Ore Concentrator, or Vanner Mills. 

Coarse Concentrating Works, Improved Jigs, Crushing Rollers, Sitters, Trammels, Rittenger Tables, and all other 
adjunct* f.ir the proper workms: of Gold, Silver and Copper Ores, complete in every A* 

HALI.IIHK IMPROVED OHE TRAMWAYS. W, refer tO GftD. Cusut mine, Idahe, 5,000 loel long; 
Columbus Mine, Col., 4,750 feet long; Mary Murphy mine, Cot., 6,000 feet tnny, all in conntunt operation. 

LEACHING MILLS, 

Improved Corliss and Plain Slide Valve Meyer's Cut-off Engines. 

CORLISS KNCINKsfr.im l-.V.lii Cilindcrs t.. :iu\i:n. PLAIN SLIDE VALVES from 6x10 to 3«xS6. BOILERS 
nf ni i :r\ ft. tin, nui.li ,,t I'lnu Iri n Works C. H. No. 1 Flangu Iron, or Otis Stool. Workmanship the most careful. All 
Rivet. Hand Driven. 

Under Engine., from 6x10 to 18x60. This latter size furnished J. B. Hoggin (or Oiant and Old Abe Co , Black Hills 
ftnd Pumping Works, for 2,000 feet deep. Baby Uolata for Prospecting, 4 II. P. to II. P. 

McCaskell's Patent Car Wheels and Axles- Best In Use. 

New York Office, Walter McDermott, Manager, Room 32, No. 2 Wall St. 



CONTINENTAL WORKS, BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

Due's Mechanical Atomizer or Pulverizer. 

For reducing to an impalpable powder all kinds of hard and brittle (■uhstancos, Buch as QUARTZ, EMERY, CORUNDUM, GOLD 
AND 8I1.VKR ORES, UVKVTE8, COAL. OCHRE. MAfuANESE, IKOV OREi, 

PHOSPHATE PvOCKl, ETC- 

It is slmp'o and rot liable to get out of order, Revolving Shell being constructed of SlemcoH-Martin steel, and all parts mechanics 
in design and of first-duss construai m. Weight 6 500 Ths.; heaviest piece, 1,500 lbs. It will pulverize 7 to 10 Ton* la IU Iloars 
with 30 H. P Fur circulars and hi. 1 particulars apply to or addreBS, 

THOS F. ROWLAND. Sole Man'fr. Brooklyn, X. Y. 




SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO.. 

416 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery 
And Assay Office. 

BIOHRHT PR10B8 PAID FOR 
Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphuret* 

Manufacturers of Bluestone. 

ALSO. LEAD PIPE, SHEET LEAD, SHOT, ETC. 

This Company has tbe beat labilities on the Coast 
for working 

SOLD, SILVER and LEAD 

IN THEIR TAKIOUS FORMS. 
PRENTISS SEI.BT. - - Superintendent 



MINERAL LANDS, 



COPP'S U. S 

Laws, Forms 

Has no surplus verbi ige. Contains Dr. Raymond's Glos- 
Bury. Explains ho w to examine mi ning titles. Contains 
numerous co urt decisions. GiveB the Public Land Com- 
missions Codiflcatiou, aud gives many au d improved forma 

Price -Full law binding, extra paper, S6.00. 
For Sale by DEWEY & CO, San Francisco. 

San Francisco Cordage Factory. 

Established 1856. 

Constantly on hand a full assortment of Manila Rope, 
Sisa Rope, Tarred Manila Rope, Hay Rope, Whale 
Line, etc., etc 

Extra nines and lengths made to order on Bhort notice 

TUBBS & CO.. 
611 and 618 Front Street, San Franclsc 

Patent Life -Saving Respirator 

PltEVENTS LEAD POISONING AND SALIVATION. 

Invaluable to those 
engaged in dry crush- 
ng quart/, mills, quick- 
silver mines, white lead 
corroding, feeding 
thrashing maohinea 
and all occupations 
where the surrounding 
atmosphere is tilled 
with dust, obnoxious 
smells or nolsoni in 
vapors. The Resplra-' 
tore are sold subject 
to approval after trial, 
and, if not satisfactory, 
the price wi«l be re- 
funded. Price, $3 
each, or $30 per dozen 
Address allcommuni 
cations and orders 
to 

H. H. BROMLEY, Sole Agent, 

43 Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




FOR SALE 

By J. M. LAKBNAN, of Grass Valley Foun- 
dry, Grass Valley, Cal. 

One 20-inch bore engine, 24-inch stroke; one lS-ineh 
bore engine, 40-inch stroke, Meyer's cut-off; one If inch 
bore engine, 36-inch stroke, Meyer's cu^-off; two 12-inch 
bore engines, 30-inch stroke.; two sets heavy pumping gear, 
with bob and connecting rod irons, etc.; 450 feet of ld-iiuih 
pump pipe of j-inch iron, heavy flanges; besides other 
mining and milling machinery. 

For information, address 

J. M. LAKENAN, 

Grass Valley, Cal. 



IMPROVED FORM 

HYDRAULIC GIANT 




We call the attention of those using or interested in Hydraulic Mining Machinery to the 
above cut of an improved form of Hydraulic Giant, in which it will be observed that the De- 
Hector and heavy weighting rear part are abolished and a lever attachment, working with a 
ratchet and pawl substituted, by which the pipeman, standing in the rear of the machine, has, 
without danger of " bucking," full control of the direction and effect of the stream. In an action 
in the U. 8. Circuit Court, entitled F. H. Fisher and Joshua Heudy vs. Richard Hoskins et al. 
of the Marysville Foundry, a permanent injunction has recently been ordered against all persons 
manufacturing or using any form of Hydraulic Machine having the equivalents of the above. 

All of the usual sizes are manufactured (under an exclusive right) and for sale at reduced 
prices by JOSHUA HKNDV, at the 

JOSHUA H^NDY MACHINE WORKS, 



49 and 51 Fremont Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



$1,000 CHALLENGE! 




WM. BARTLINO. HHNRY KIMBALl 

BARTLIN0 & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS. 

Paper Rulers & Blank Book Manufacturer* 
505 Olay Street, (southwest corner Sansome), 

SAN PRJ.NOIBOO. 



THE FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR. 

— OR— 

VANNING MACHINE. 

Over 400 are now n use, giving entire satisfaction. Saves from 40 to 100 per cent, more than any other Con- 
centrator in use, and concentrations are clean from the first working. The wear and tear are merely nominal. 

A machine can be seen In working order, and ready to make tests, at the office ol Hinckley, Spiers & Hayes, 220 
Fremont Street. 

To those Intending to manufacture or purchase the so-called "Triumph" Concen- 
trator, we herewith state: 

That legal advice has been given that all shaking motion applied to an endless traveling belt used for concen- 
tration of ores is an infringement on patents held and owned by the Frue Vanning Machine Company. 

That suit has been commenced in New York against an end-Bhake machine similar to the Triumph, and (hat as 
soon as decision is reached tuHbe courts there, proceedings will be taken against all Western infringements. 

That the patent laws make uners of infringements responsible as well as makers, and the public iB therefore 
warned that there is considerable risk in purchasing any end-Bhake machine until our various patents have been 
decided. 

That if there are those who for any reason prefer an end-shake machine, we can nnnufacture and sell to such a 
machine of that description, as efficient as the Triumph, and at a lower price, and no liability for infringement wid 
then be incurred by the purchaser. 

That we shall protect ourselveB against any one making, selling or using any machine infringing any of our 
patents. Patented July 9, 1807; May 4, I860; Dec. 22, 1374; Sept. 2, 1879; April 27, 1880. Patents applied for. 

That we are, and have been, ready at any time, to make a competitive trial against the Triumph, or any other 
machine, for stakes of 91,000. 

ADAMS & CARTER, Agents Frue Vanning Machine Company, 

Boom 7. 100 California Street, - - - SAN FR&NCISCO, CAL 

Nov. (i, 1082. 



N. W. SPAULDING'S 



'ST? SEVTlia™ i 





PATENT DETACHABLE TOOTH SAWS, 

Manufactory, 17 & 19 Fremont St., S. F. 



H. H. BROMLEY, 

Dealer in Leonard & Ellis Celebra'-ed 

..TRADE MART) 




rapt 



STEAM CYLINDER AND MACHINE OILS, 
The Be^t and Cheapest. 

These Superior Oils cannot be purchased through dealer 
aid are sold direct to consumer only by H. H. BROMLEY, 
Bole dealer in theBe goi d* 

Reference— Any Brsl-clauB Engine or Machine Builder in 
America. Address, -V' S .irraiiientu Si., &• ■'• 



THE BEST IN USE! 



iMPRoVBkBUCKET 



ThiB is the only Scientifically Constructed Bucket in 
the market. It is ttiu k out from charcoal stampinp- 
iron. No corners to c.teh. No Beams to buret. No 
interior corners to clog up. It runs with great sase, and 
half the power of the old Btvle bucket. WILL OUT- 
WEAR HALF A DOZEN OF THEM. 

PRICES REDUCED. 

T. F. ROWLAND, Sole Mfr. 

Brooklyn, N. V, 

H. P. GREGORY & CO., Agents, San Francisco, Cal., 
carry a stock of all sizes. 



PACIFIC POWER CO. 

Room with steam power to let in the 
Pacific Power Co. 'a new brick building. 
Stevenson street, near Market. Eleva- 
tor in building. Apply at the Com- 
pany's office. 314 California street. 



cc :DTT:ixro-A.:Lsr " 

ROCK DRILL 

FOR MINES, (JUARRIE3, ETC. 

J. CTJYAS, Agent, 



10 Park Place, 



New York. 



RICHARD C. REMMEY, Agent, 

Philadelphia. Chemical Stoneware Manufactory, 

1100 East Cumberland St., Piii..A!.<am'A, Pa. 

I Manufacturer of 




FOR- 

g^. Manufacturing 
acid! OTreinfaUs. 



W P$ [*y* POT If Ainu Chemical Ericks 



fur Glover Tower; 



28 



Mining and' Scientific Press. 



[July H, 1883 



Patents y\ND Inventions. 

List of U. S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

From the official list of U. S. Patents in Dewey & Co.'s 
Scientific Pkess Patent Agency, 252 Market St., S. F 

For Week Ending Ji'i.y 3, 1883. 

280.437.— Seed Sower Attachment— Wm. T. 
Armstrong, Sole-dad, Cal. 

280,561.— Sulky— David Berry, Gualala, Cal. 

280,442.— Safety Car Truck— Samuel Brown, 
S. F. ' 

280,443. — BOOT— Thos. H, Buckingham, S. F. 

280,370.— Dough RAISER— A. P. Gross, S. F. 

280,617.— Making [nsertible saw Teeth— 
Wm. Hawkins, S. F. 

280,471.— Turning Wrist-pins— F. M. Hazle- 
ton, Red Bluff, Cal. 

280,475.— Extension Ladder and Truck— D. 
W. Hoover, Gas Point, Cal. 

280,484.— Gun Sight — J. C. Kelton, S. F. 

280,634. — Vehicle Wheel— E. Lawson, S. F. 

280,384.— Railway Operated by Under- 
ground Ropes — J. B. Low, S. F. 

280,652.— Type-holding Attachment for 
Hand Stamps— L. H. Moise, S. F. 

280,410.— Fire Extinguisher— A. F. Spawn, 
Oakland, Cal. 

280,532.— Feed Cup— E. J. Thomas, Oakland, 
Cal. 

280,694.- -Necktie Holder— E. B. Warner, 
S. F. 

280,545. —GREASE Trap— Silas Wilcox, Portland, 
Oregon. 

14,025.— Design (Masonic Jewel oh Emblem), 
D. W. Laird, S. F. 

Note.— Copies of U. S. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by tele- 
graph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent busi- 
ness for Pacific coast Inventors transacted with perfect 
security and in the shortest possible time. 

Notices of Recent Patents. 

Among the patents recently obtained through 
Dewey & Co.'s Scientific Press American and 
Foreign Patent Agency, the following are 
worthy of special mention: 

Rotaky Engine. — Chas. C. Garcelon and 
Wm. A. Woods, SantaCruz, Cal. No. *2S0,027. 
Dated June 20, 18S3. This invention relates 
to certain improvements in rotary engines, and 
consists in various details of construction by 
which steam is admitted through one or two 
ports, so as to be used expansively, and by 
means of a hollow piston valve one or both 
ports may be opened or closed, or the engine 
may be reversed. In the operation of the en- 
gine, the steam is admitted through two ports 
and pressed upon two of the pistons with which 
the engine is provided. After thus starting, if 
the steam is to be used expansively, it is done 
by closing one of the entrance ports. When 
this is done, a small portion only of the pis- 
ton having been projected, the steam follows it 
as it is gradually forced out, uutil the next pis- 
ton reaches the port and intercepts any further 
supply to the first piston. The remainder of 
its stroke, to the point where it passes the first 
exhaust opening, is completed under the pres- 
sure of the expanded steam. 

Folding Box. — Paride Canessa, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. No. 2S0,013. Dated June 26, 1883. 
This invention relates to that - class of boxes, 
trunks, valises, etc. , which by their construc- 
tion are adapted to be folded up into a small 
compass when not hi use, thereby facilitating 
transportation. This box is connected with 
folding hinged sides, and ends, connected with 
the sides by peculiar links or hinges, adapting 
them to fold over the sides when these latter 
are laid flat. The ends enclose the removable 
top, and all the parts are secured together by 
pins. When the box is opened locking devices 
hold it firm and well capable of carrying its 
load. 

Picture Bracket. — Chas. Megow, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. No. 280,057. Dated June 26, 1SS3. 
This invention consists in an easily arranged de- 
vice, to be suspended from the picture molding 
by other fastenings, and adapted to receive and 
sustain the picture. This rests on small brack- 
ets, and is hooked at its top from behind, by 
means of which it is supported and its inclina- 
tion assured. The advantage of this device is 
in its simplicity, economy and effectiveness. It 
does away with nails and other means usually 
employee! to suspend and hold a picture at its 
proper inclination. 

Two Salt Lake hoodlums, one a son of Apos- 
tle Rich and the other of Probate Judge Smith, 
shining lights in the Mormon church, entered 
the /ions' Savings Bank a day or two since, felled 
the cashier with an iron bar and then made oft' 
with all the money they could get. 

[xdigkstiox, dyspepsia, heart-burn, nausea, etc., cured 
li\ using Brown's Iron Bitters. 



Attend to This. 



Our 



subscribers will find the date they have paid to printed 
____: label of their paper. If it is not correct, or if the 
pape.- should ever come, beyond the lime desired, be sure 
to notify the publishers by letter or postal card. If we are 
not notified within a reasonable time, we cannot be respon- 
sible for the errors or omission of accents. 



Burs' i' Ymuuk ok tub Press.— We have a few seta of 

the back files of the Mining and Scientific Prkss which 

we will sell for S3 per (half yearly) volume. In cloth aud 

leather binding, §5. These volumes, complete, are scarce, 

aluable for future reference and library use. 



News in Brief. 

The number of deaths in the city of New 
York vary from 150 to 200 daily. 

The Wisconsin prohibitionists talk of run- 
ning a candidate for the Presidency. 

Chief Moses has completed and signed his 
agreement to relinquish his reservation in Or- 
egon. 

Fires in the Oregon woods have destroyed a 
great deal of valuable timber, lumber and other 
property. 

It is understood that President Henry Vil- 
lard's excursion party to the Pacific coast will 
number 250 persons. 

A -Waterfall 1,500 feet high, is reported to 
have been discovered at the head of the Cowlitz 
river, Washington Territory. 

Frank Rogel, of Oakland, lost four children 
last week by diphtheria, and his ouly remaining 
child lies at the point of death. 

Denis Kearney, who lately attended the 
Anti- Monopoly Convention, was refused ad- 
mission as a delegate to that body. 

There were twenty-six cases of sunstroke in 
New York and six in Philadelphia one day last 
week. Many of them proved fatal. 

Physicians, it is stated, have discovered 
over a hundred cases of leprosy among the boys 
of this city, caused by smoking Chinese made 
cigarettes. 

Postmaster General Gresham has affirmed 
the validity of Key's order, denying the use of 
the United States mails to the Louisiana Lot- 
tery company. 

Marco A. SOTO, President of the Republic of 
Honduras, is on his way to Washington, with a 
view of establishing a reciprocity treaty with 
the United States. 

GRiMLEYjtheaeronautwhostarted from Hones- 
dale, Pa., on July 4th, landed on the Catskills, 
encountered a severe hurricane, and had a ter- 
rible time generally. 

Abraham Goldsmith, a veteran pawnbroker 
of Chicago, was lately closed out under an exe- 
cution. It is noted as something unusual in 
this line of business. 

Theodore Thomas, who, with his noisy 
band, collected many ducats from our citizens a 
few weeks since, speaks now in terms not very 
complimentary of our people. 

According- to advices from Behera, in Egypt, 
the cattle plague has ended with the death of 
all cattle in that district. The cotton worm is 
now doing great damage there. 

Advices from Venezuela state that locusts 
arc making havoc in many parts of the country. 
In one night all the vegetation in the neighbor- 
hood of Mooron was destroyed. 

It is reported that a yacht is being prepared 
and will be held in readiness to take the Khe- 
dive to Naples in the event of the spread of 
cholera making his departure necessary. 

St. Mary's Hall, Benicia. 

Among our uotices of schools on another page 
will be found the announcement of St. Marys 
Hall, Benicia, an institution for the education 
of young ladies, of which Rev. L. Delos Mans- 
field, is director. Mr. Mansfield is on old and 
successful teacher, having been engaged in the 
work in the East L loug before coming to this 
coast, and in a school on the Hudson had the 
honor of educating the children of Wm. Cullen 
Bryant. His school at Benicia is in a highly 
prosperous and flourishing condition, enjoys a 
high reputation, and we doubt not is a most 
desirable place for the education of young la 
dies, to which sex its admission is limited. The 
catalogue contains a list of most desirable 
references, including some of the most promi- 
nent citizens of San Francisco, and gives full 
information as to the courses of study, terms, 
etc. Address Rev. L. Delos Mansfield, Benicia, 
Cal. 



The best cure for diseases of the nerves, brain and 
muscles, is Brown's Iron Bitters. 



Our Agents. 

Our Friends can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend to scud none 
but worthy men. 

G. W. McGrew — Santa Clara county. 

M. P. Owen— Santa Cruz county. 

J. W. A. Wright— Merced, Tulare and Kern counties. 

Jared C. Hoag— California. 

B. W. Crowell— Arizona Territory 

M. H. Joseph— Eureka, Nev. 

I. M. Leuiy — Los Angeles, San Bernardino and San 
Diego counties. 

A. C Knox— Oregon and Washington Ter. 

J. J. Bartell— Yolo county. 



Complimentary samples of this paper are 
occasionally sent to parties connected with the 
interests specially represented in its columns. 
Persons so receiving copies are requested to 
examine its contents, terms of subscription, and 
give it their own patronage, and, as far as 
pi'acticable, aid in circulating the journal, and 
making its value more widely known to others, 
and extending its influence in the cause it faith- 
fully serves. Subscription rate, $4 a year, in 
advance. Extra copies mailed for 10 cents, if 
ordered soon enough. Personal attention will 
be called to this (as well as other notices, at 
times,) by turning a leaf. 



Important additions are being continually made in 
Woodward's Gardens. The grotto walled with aquaria is 
constantly receivi ig accessions of new fish and other marine 
life. The number of sea lions is increased, and there is a 
better chance to study their actions The pavilion has new 
varieties of performances. The floral department is replete, 
and the wild animals in good vigor. A day at Woodward's 
Gardens is a day well spent. 



The Secret 



of the universal success of 
Brown's Iron Bitters is sim- 
ply this : It is the best Iron 
preparation ever made; is 
compounded on thoroughly- 
scientific, chemical and 
medicinal principles, and 
does just what is claimed for 
it — no more and no less. 

By thorough and rapid 
assimilation with the blood, 
it reaches every part of the 
system, healing, purifying 
and strengthening. Com- 
mencing at the foundation 
it builds up and restores lost 
health — in no other way can 
lasting benefit be obtained. 



70 Dearborn Ave., Chicago, Nov. 7. 
X have been a great sufferer from 
a very weak stomach, heartburn, and 
dyspepsia in its worst form. Nearly 
everything I ate gave me distress, 
and 1 could eat but little. I have 
tried every thingrecommended, have 
taken the prescriptions of a dozen 
physicians, but got no relief until I 
took Brown's Iron Bitters. X feel 
none of the old troubles, ana am a 
new man. I am getting much 
stronger, and feel first-rate. I am 
a railroad engineer, and now make 
my trips regularly. I can not say 
too much in praise of your wonder- 
ful medicine. D. C. Mack. 



Brown's Iron Bitters 
does not contain whiskey 
or alcohol, and will not 
blacken the teeth, or cause 
headache and constipation. 
It will cure dyspepsia, indi- 
gestion, heartburn, sleep- 
lessness, dizziness, nervous 
debility, weakness, &c. 



Use only Brown's Iron Bitters made by 
Brown Chemical Co., Baltimore. Crossed 
red lines and tradc.mark on wrapper. 



BUY LAND 



Where you cau get a crop every year; 
where you will make something every sea- 
son; where you are sure of having a crop 
when prices are high; where you have a 
healthy place to live ; where you can raise 
semi-tropical as well as other fruits; where 
you can raise a diversity of grain and vege- 
tables, and get a good price for them. Go 
and see the old Reading Grant (hi the 
upper Sacramento Valley), and you will 
find such land for sale in subdivisions to 
suit purchasers, at very low rates and on 
easy terms. There are 12,000 acres at from 
§3 to $30 per acre, including pasturage, 
vine, fruit and grain land. Will sell a 
large tract at a great bargain. .Send stamp 
for map and circular to Edward Frisbie, 
proprietor (on the Grant), Anderson, Shasta, 
county, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June .10, 1SS:1, the Board of 
Directors of the GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
C] ETY has declared a dividend on Term Deposits at the 
rate of four and thirty -two one-hundredths (4 32-100) per 
cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of 
three and six-tenths (.1 0-10) per cent per annum, free from 
Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 2d day of 
July, ISSS. By order, 

GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



This paper Is printed, -with In& Manufac- 
tured by Ciiarles Eneu Jonneon & Co., 5'.-t> 
South iota St., Philadelphia. Branch Offi- 
ces— 47 Rose St., Ne w York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Chicago. Agent tor the Paclno Coaut— 
Joseph H. Dorety. 5H9 Commercial St. S. F. 



Rediands. 



The most delightfully situated colony i 1 
Southern California. 

Remarkably healthy, being 2,000 feet above 
the sea level. 

Wholly devoted to fruit culture, and espe- 
cially adapted to oranges and raisins. 

Advantages of church, school, store, depot, 
hotel, stage line, telegraph and telephone. 

Illustrated Circulars on Application. 

JUDSON& BROWN, 

Rediands, 

SAN BERNARDINO. CALIFORNIA. 



Sewing Machines. 



Several first-class styles, good as new, will 1>e sold at 
a bargain. Call on or address 11. F. D., at this office. 



UNITED STATES 

Submarine Monitor 

230 Montgomery Street, Room 20, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

WM. H MILLIKEN, Engineer. 

jfc*?' Plans are on exhibition and stock ready for issue. 
Any information that is desired can he furnished at th 
office as above,. 

Spring Valley Water Works. 

oiTit'K, fill! California St., Sun Francisco, July 6, 1S811. 

The Annual Meeting of the stockholders of this Company 
for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year, and for 
the transaction of such other business as may be brought 
before the meeting, will be held at the office of the Com- 
pany, on the EIGHTEENTH <>F JULY, 1883, at 12 o'clock 
M. Ry order of the Board of Trustees. 

WM. NORMS, Secretary. 



EVERY FOOT WARRANTED. 




BELTING and PACKING. 

extra Quality Endless Belts, Steam and 

Suction Hose, Air, Oil ana Brewers' 

Hose, Car Springs, Valves, 

GasKetB, Etc., Etc. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 

R. H. PEASE, JR., ). AQK11T 3 

S. M. RUNYON, ) AGHira > 

577 & 679 MABKE ST., San Francisco 



Register Your 
TRADE 




MARKS 

Through Dewey & Co.'s Scien- 
tific Press Patent Agency, No. 
252 Market St., cor. Front, S. F. 



Explorers', Miners' and Metallurgists' 
Companion. 

Comprisi:.g a practical exposition of the various (M- 
j-iartmftiis of Exploration, Mining, Enginocring, Assaying 
and Metallurgy, containing 672 pages and S3 engraving?, 
by J. S. Phillips, M. E., forme' ly of California, a practical 
operator for 40 years. Bound hi cloth, $10.50. Sold by 
Dewey & Co 



July 14, 1883] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



Educational. 



/ST. 



MARY'S HALL 



BENICIA. CAL. 



LL^ 



the jstejx/t TEitivr 



SEMINARY FOR YOUNG LADIES 

■ 

I 
Art, will 

Thursday August 3, 1883. 

/*■ i ■ i ■■ itli full particular*, or 

; i . 

Rl I D\ i Ofi M \\M II l.|i, A. M.. 
Km rui 




THE HARMON SEMINARY, 

Berkeley, Cal. 

A FLRST-CLASS BOAKDING SCHOOL 
FOR YOUNG LADIES. 

Poi i laloffuoH <*r other information, address s. S. 
HARMON, Berkeley, Col., ox E, J. Wiokson, hi Olay 
Street. Son Fran 



Of rVEY & CO. 

<• SCIENTIFIC PRESS 
American and Foreign 

PATENT AGENCY, 




NEW OFFICES, 1882: 

Market Street, Elevator 12 Front, 

San Francisco. 

Branch Offices in ail Foreign Countries, 



OlKCULAflS OF INFORMATION FOR INVENTORS BENT FREB 
ON APPLICATION. 



GEO. H. 8TR0N8. 



W. B. Ewer. 



A. T. Dewek 



Mining Companies. 



Persons tntereeted in incorporations will 

do well to recommend the publication of 

the official notices or their companies lu 

■■iper. as the cheapest appropriate 

medium for advertising. 



QUICKSILVER. 



TjGLE CELEBRATED f\ BRAND. 

Skipped Direct from the New Almadea Mine, 

New Almaueo, Santa Clara Co.", Ca'. 

For sale in any quantity Tracl^m.i'k A on top c 
Husks Becurcd by United Sutcs Patent, nnd regl&JiiTd 
VI i8k8 contain 7t>i lt>s. Quicksilver. Wei^'rtt aod purity 
guaranteed, 

CAKLOAD LOTS will be shipprd from Sin Jose, f. o. 
b., for Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Mon amaoil Idpfro 
or Utab,or delivered at PacificMail Stc unship Co. 'swiiar,*, 
and Depot of S. P. R. R. Co., San FranciBCO, witoout 
charge. Railroad rates from San Jose are tbe tume rs 
?rom San Francisco. 

J. B. RANDOL, 



P. O Bo-c, 107$. 



S20 San --tome S~r«fir.. R. F 



Printers, Authors, Inventors, 
Patentees, Builders, Manufactur- 
ers, Machinists, Merchants, and 
other trades -people can have satisfac- 
tory Engravings and Electrotypes made 
at moderate prices by the S. F. En- 
cravinc Co., No. 405 Kearny St. 
Send photographs, sketches, drawings, 
models or samples for estimates. Map 
and Woodcut Engravings enlarged or 
reduced by the aid of photography, at 
less than one-half the cost of the origi- 
nals and in a short time. Photo-relief, 
Zincograph and other improved meth- 
ods employed. 



■ m ■ ■ M Goort lanu r,nat will raise a crop every 
I jl Ik 1 1 I year. < >ver 12,000 acres fur sale in lots to 
I 11 111 I I 'suit. Very desirable Fruit, Vine, Grain, 
Llll >U Vegetable, Hay, and Pasture Land. 
Near Railroad and Sacramento river; &i to $S(i per acre. 
Wood and water convenient. U. S. Title perfect. Send 
stamp for illustrated circular, to EDWARD FRISBIE, 
Proprietor of Reading Ranch, Anderson, Shasta Co., CaL 



Inventors modIPmTker. 

258 Market St., N. E. cor. Front, up-stairs, Sao Fra cisco 
Experimental machinery and all kinds of models, tin, cop- 
per and braes work 



Scat m Gold Mining Company. — Location 

Ipal plat • ol be i ilifornfn 

■t work-., Ilrvtnwn, \ 
SuTlUK, rii. ri an dt linquunl upon 

April 10, i 

ii LnhnldtTH, :.- i 

\.i it 



Naiiu - 

- .« i \ 

■■ ■ 

■ ■ \ Trustee 
Martin, \, Trustee 
A, Trustee 

A.Tru-t.. 

A, Trustee 

A, Trustee 

\ I i i i - t . ■, 
A, Trustee 
\. T 



Mnrtin 

Martin 

Martin, 

Martin 

Martin 

Martin 

M irtin 

Marti i 

Hartii 

Martii 



\. mi ,. 



\a 

17 

a, Trustee i* 

Martin, a. Trust* < . . . r» 

Martin, \, Trustee SO 

MirtiM, \, Trustee -ji 

Martin, \. Tm itoo 22 

Martin, A, Trustee j;i 

Martin, \, Trustee -ji 

Martin, \. Trustee m 

Martin, A, Trustee ■.;<; 



10 

in 

R.000 
5,000 
&.UO0 
fi.OOO 
1 .(Mm 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
i | ., 
■ ■ 
1,000 
1 ,000 
1,000 
1,000 

.'.IX I 

500 

. ,i ii i 
500 

.'KM. 

500 



Martin 

Martin 
Martin. 



ill bee 



1888. at tin 



;,i h i 

500 

500 

4,000 

!Khi 

On 

G.00O 

5,000 

,-,,11111! 

1,000 
100 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
111,1)1 mi 
111! I 

1,800 



87 50 
87 50 

:;: 50 
87 50 
37 50 
37 50 

:s; :.n 
57 50 

8 



Martin, \. Trust.. 

Martin, \. Trust,,. l »h 

Martin, v, Trustee 20 

Martin, A, Trustee so 

Martin, V, Trustee 8] 

Davis, John a ,;j 

Martin, a, Trustee 38 

Martin. A. Trustee 34 

Martin, a. Trustee 35 

Martin, A, Trustee 3G 

Kellogg, GW 87 

Martin, \, Trustee its 

Martin, A, Trustee 30 

A, Truster 40 

^.Trustee ii 

\ Tin.,, ,■ 40 

A. Trustee t:: 

Fischer, Bertha C 45 

( ibrnwall , P B to 

And in accord :c vj itli law and an 

of Directors, made oh tin- loth daj of April, 1883, bo main 
iharesol each parcel oi said stock as inaj be necessary, 

l( l --t pill lie :::;!- .;i :t ifjyj ] dlfinda St RcCK' 

incisco, Cal., on TUESDAY, the 5th dav of June, 
hour ol 1 o'clock r. h. of said day, to poj said 
ieliinpient assessment thereon, together h itli costs of ad- 
. ortising and expenses of sale. 

A. MARTIN, Secretary. 

OFFICE 1: n B, 528 Ualifornia St., San Francisco, 

talifornio. 



876 1 hi 

875 ihi 

:tG7 50 

7 50 

376 00 

375 «si 

875 00 



750 00 



300 75 

ler of the Board 



POSTPONEMENT. 

Tlic above sale of delinquent si.-.rk is hereby postponed 
to THURSDAY, the &th daj o( June, 1883, al I o'eloch 
r. m., at the same place, lu order of the Board of Di 
rectors. \, M \UTIN, 8ecretar>'. 

San Faancisco, June 0, 1883. 

The above salu of delinquent Btock is hereby postponed 

toTHUKSDAY, J11I3 26, IS88, at 1 o'c k p.M.,atthe 

,me place. By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. MARTIN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 28, 1883. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF Tin; 

Standard Consolidated Mining Company, 

San Francisco, July 2, 1888, 
At. a meeting of the Board of Directors of the abou 
earned company held this day, Dividend No. 56, of twenty 
live rents (25c.) per share, was declared, payable THURS 
DAV, July 12, 1883, at the Fanners' Loan and Trust 1 v.m 
pany, in New Vork, or at, the office in this city. 

WILLIAM WILLIS, Secretary, 
OFFICE Room No. 20, Nevada bldck, No. 309 Mont. 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF THE 

Bulwer Consolidated Mining Company 

San Francisco, June 21, 1883. 

At a nrteeting nf the Board of Directors of the abovi 
named company, held this day, Dh idend No, is, of fifteen 
cents (15c.) per share, was declared, payable on Monday, 
July '1. 1883, Transfer Looks closed on Saturday, J\ine28 
1883, at 12 o'clock m. This dividend is payable at tbe 
Farmers' Loan and Trust Company in New York, on al 
stock issued there, and at the office in this city on all 
stock issued here. - WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 

OPFIG&T-Rponi 29, Nevada Block, No. 300 Montgomery 
Street, Sun Francisco, Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould and Curry Sijver Mining Company 



ASSESSMENT Ni 

Levied lune 1 £ 

Delinquent July 20, 1888 

Day of Sale August 13, 1883 

Amount Fifty rents per share 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
OiKin-: -Room No. 60, Nevada Block, No. 30!? Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco, Cal 



Mining Books. 



Orders for Mining and Scientific Books in general will 
be supplied through this officcat published rates. 



THE CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS. 



lAXl'KAirri'KKRS OF 



Sporting, Cannon, Mining, Blasting and 

HERCULES POWDER 

HERCULES POWDER will break more rock, is stronger, safer aud better than any 
Explosive in use, and is the only Nitro-Glycerine Powder chemically compounded to neutralize 
the poisonous fumes, notwithstanding bombastic and pretentious claims by others. 

It durivee Its name from HimctTiiis, the most famous hero of Greek Mythology . whfl Ml 'i .hi. BUporhaman 

strength, on one occasion ho Blow Mvaitl giants who opposed nun, and witaoni blowol 

his clul' broke I high mouutaiu from summit to base. 



No. 1 (XX) is the Strongest Explosive Known. 
No. 2 is superior to anv powder of that grade. 

PATENTED IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE. 

ORDERS RECEIVED FOR HERCULES CAPS AND FUSE. 



JOHN F. LOHSE, SECY. 



Office. No. 230 California Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



"W^illiam Hawkins. 

(SUCCESSOR TO HAWKINS & CANTREL.U. 

MJLCiaillLSriE WORKS 

210 and 212 Beale Street, bet. Howard and Folsom Sts., • • San Francisco. 

Manufacturer of 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES, 

FOR MININQ AND OTHER PURPOSES. 

AJso of the HAWKINS' PATENT ELEVATOR HOIST, for Hotels, Warehouses 
and Public Buildings. 

Steam Engines and all Kinds of Mill and Mining Machinery. 



Patented Oct. 11, '81. 




1ST E"\n 1ST 'S 



Patent Ore 
FURNACE, 

Working up to 94 per cent ol Fire .ssaj 

using 25 per cenl loss sail since 

commencing, about a 

year ago. 

/(,- LICENSES F0H USE l'<n;;s.UK, i ( 

in- Furnaces Constructed, 

Address, 

R. A. NEVIN, Patentee. 

Box 2361.) San Francisco, Cal, 



Tustin's Pulverizer 

WORKS ORE WET OR DRY. 




MANUFACTURKD AT 

The Tustln Windmill Horse-power and 

Pumping machine Works. 
308 Mission Street. S. F„ Cal. 

By W. I. TDSTIN. Inventor and Patontoe. 



IMHAUSERS 

Watchman's Improved Time Detector, 

WITH SAFLTY LOCK ATTACHMENT. 




THE ROLLER ORE FEEDER. 



1 Wkv 2S, 1882. 




(Patented 187. r i-G-7-S0-81.) 
Bcwai e ol T.n'riTi^enivnts. Tbis Instnrncnt ii supplied 
vvitn 121o}*8lor 12 Btatioua. Invaluable for all '-oner rus 
employ ir*/ni(; lit watchrae.i. Scud for Circulars to 

DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & CO., 

Saa Francisco, - - C£t!fornla, 



Tbis n iae bt-.it Kid ebf.^i e i Ore Frj ier now in vrtc, 
It ma fewer pai J e, i-eiiuir^s 1- js power, is simpler Eta 

adjustment tban any otner. Freda •oaree ore or »>,'c 

clay alike uniformily, under one or all the stamps in a 

b ittery, as required 
In the Bunker Hill Mill it has run i-ontinuouslv £or two 

y trs, never having bean out of order or cc-.jtwj ;■ a rlollt'V 

for I'epnlrs. 

Golden State and Miners' Iron Works, 

Sole Marmfactureru, 
337 First Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Chas. E. Lloyd. J. S. B*ard3I,by. 

BEARDSLEY & LLOYD, 
KEAL ESTATE AGENTS. 

No, 912 Broadway Street, 

Between 8th & 9th Sta., OalJand. 



Particular Attention given to Negotiating; Loans upon 

Favo' able Terms. Acting as Ag-ents for Buyers and 

Sellers of Real Estate, and the Management 

of Business for Absent Owners 



Rkmittancks to this office should e made hy fiostal ovdr i 
or registered letter, when practicable. Cost ol postal 
order, for §15 or less, 10 cts.: for registered letter, En add 
tion to regular postago (at H cts. per half ounce), lO'etsi 



30 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 14, 1883 



Irop apd JWachijie toofe 

F. P. Bicon, Pres. C. L. Fouts, Sec'y. 

The Globe Ironworks Co., 

Manufacturers and Repairsrs of all kinds of 

MACHINERY AND IRON CASTINGS, 

ASD BU1LDBBS OF 

Locomotives, Hoisting and Mining Machinery. Port- 
able, Stationery and Marine Engines. 

Office and Works— 222 and 224 Fremont St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
iaTApents for C. H. Baker's Mining; Horse Power; 
BUhop's Mining Pump Apparatus; C. H. Baker's Quick- 
silver Feeder. 

UNION IRON WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO, OAL. 
ROOT, NIELSON & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STEAM ENGINES, BOILERS AND ALL 
Kinds of Machinery for Mining Purposes. 

Flouring Mills, Saw Mills and Quartz Mills Machinery 
constructed, fitted up and repaired. 

Front Street, Between N and O Streets, 

SACRAMENTO, OAL. 



COKE. P ATENT , COKE. 

This COKE is exclusively used by Prof, Thomas Price, In his assay office, by the Selby 

Smelting and Lead Co., Prescott, Scott & Co., Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works and others in 
this city. Large supplies are regularly forwarded to consumers in Salt Lake and Nevada, to the 
Copper Queen Mining Co., Longfellow Copper Mining Co. and other consumers in Arizona. 

The undersigned are in receipt of regular supplies from Cardiff, Wales, and offer the COKE 
for sale in quantities to suit purchasers. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

316 California St., San Francisco. 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works, 

Manufacture Iron Castings and Machinery 

of all Kinds at Greatly Reduced Bates. 

STEVENSON'S PATENT 

Mold-Board AMALGAMATORS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

First St., between Howard A Folsom, S. F. 



California Brass Foundry, 

No. 125 First Street, Opposite Minna. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



All kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt 
Metal Castings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes, 
Sheathing Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steam- 
boat Bells and Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks 
and Valves, Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Coup- 
lings and Connections of all Bizes and patterns, furnished 
with dispatch. ^.PRICES MODERATE.*^ 

J. H. WEED. V. KINGWELL. 



California Machine Works, 

WM. H. BIRCH, 

Engineer and Machinist, 

X19 Beale Street, San Francisco. 

Portable and Double Sawmills, Steam Engines, Flour, 

Quartz and Mining Machinery. BrotuVB Patent Rock Crusher 

PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

No. 1 Crusher, 4 tons per hour 8*50.00 

" 2 " 6 ' 625.00 

'• 3 " 3 925.00 

" " 1500 lbs " " 150.00 

The Best Crusher in the Market and at the Lowest Prices. 
Power, Hydraulic Ram or Cylinder Elevators, Hand Power 
Hoists, for sidewalks any purpose, Saw Arbors and Mill 
Fittings. Repairing promptly attended to 




Berry & Place Machine Go . 

* PARKE & LACY. ProDrletors. 





GARDNER 
GOVERNOR. 



No. S California Street, 

San Francisco, 

CAL. 

Importers and Dealers in every 
Variety of 

Wood and Iron Working Machinery, 

STEAM PUMPS, 

Stationary, Portable and H« latin g Engines and Boilers 
Sawmills, Shingle Mil!*, Emery Wheels and Grind- 
ers, Gardner Governors, Planer Knives, Sand 
Paper in Rolls, together with a general line 
of mining and Mill Supplies, includ- 
ing 1 Leather Belting, Rubber Belt- 
ing Packing and Hose. 
£3T Cataloe^ies furnished on Application, .SJ 



Geo. W. PitESCOTT, President. 
Irving M. Scott, Gen'l Manager. 



H. T. Scott, Vice-Pres't and Treas. GEO. W. Dickie, Manager; 

J. o'B. Gunn, Secretary. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Office, 61 First St. | Cor. First & Mission Sts., S. F. | P. 0. Box. 2128. 



BUILDERS OF 



STEAM. AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Agents of the Cameron Steam Pump. 

Home Industry. —All Work Tested and Guaranteed. 

Vertical Engines, Raby Hoists, Stamps, 

Horizontal Enotnes, Ventilating Fans, Pans, 

Automatic Cot-opt Engines, Rock Breakers, Settlers, 

Compound Condensing Engines, Self-Feeders, Retorts 

Shafting, Pulleys, *Eto., Etc. 

TRY OUR MAKE, CHEAPEST AND BEST IN USE. 

UNION IRON WORKS, 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

Of all sizes — from 2 to 60-Horse power. Also, Quartz 
Mills, Mi ni ng Pumps, Hoisting Machinery, Shafting, Iron 
T/mks, etc. For sale at the lowest prices by 

J. HENDY, 49 and 61 Fremont Street, S. F. 



THOMAS THOMPSON. 

THOMPSON 



THORNTON THOMPSON. 

BROTHERS, 



EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

and 1S1 Beale St., between Mission and Howard, S. F. 



MANDPAOTXJRBRft OF OABTTNGB OP BVHRT BH80RIPTTON. 



SILVER MEDAL AWARDED 



Mechanics' Fair, 1882, 



Best Upright Engine aud Boiler com- 
bined, BeBt Hoisting Engine and Boiler 
combined and Best Upright Engine in 
motion to 



Send fur Late Circulars. 



Successors to PRESCOTT, SCOTT & (.' 



SEX!! rllll LATi; I'MUTLAIltj 



Corner Beale and Howard Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

W. H TAYLOR, Pres't. JOSEPH MOORE, Sup't 

Builders of Steam Machinery 

In all its Brahohbs, 

Steamboat, Steamship, Land 

Engines and Boilers, 

HIGH PRESSURE OR COMPOUND. 



STEAM VESSELS, of all kinds, bailt complete with 
Hulls of Wood, Iron or Composite. 

ORDINARY ENGINES compounded when ad- 
visable. 

STEAM LAUNCHES, BargeB and Steam Tugs con- 
structed with reference to the Trade in which they are 
to be employed. Speed, tonnage and draft of water 
guaranteed. 

STEAM BOILERS. Particular attention given to 
the quality of the material and workmanship, and]none 
but first-class work produced. 

SUGAR MILLS AND SUGAR-MAKING 
MACHINERY made after the most approved plans 
Also, all Boiler Iron Work connected therewith. 

WATER PIPE, of Boiler or Sheet Iron, of any size 
made in suitable lengthB for connecting together, or 
sheets rolled, punched, and packed for shipment ready 
to be riveted on the ground. 

HYDRAULIC RIVETING. Boiler Work and 
Water Pipe made by this establishment, riveted by 
Hydraulic Riveting Machinery, that quality of work 
being far superior to hand work. 

SHIP WORK. Ship and Steam Capstans, Steam 
Winches, Air and Circulating Pumps, made after the 
most approved plans. 

PUMPS. Direct Acting Pumps, for Irrigation or City 
Water Works purposes, built with the celebrated Davy 
Valve Motion, superior to anv other Pump. 



BAKER'S MINING HORSE POWER. 



Jjk GOLD QUARTZ and PLACER MINERS' 

Silver Plated 

-A_]VL J A_LC3--A.:M:-A-Ti:rsrO PLATES, 

For Saving Gold. 

Eveiy description of plates for Quartz Mills and Wet or Dry Placer Anialgh 
mator Machines made to order, corrugated or plait 1 . 

OYER 2,000 ORDERS FILLED. 
The most extensive and successful manufacturer of these plates io. the 
United States. Will fitl orders for delivery In Rocky Mountain and Pacific 
Coast Mining States at lower prices than any oth'cr manufacturer. 

Old Miuing Plates Replated. Old Plates bought, i 
gold separated for low percentage of result. 
SEND FOR PRICE LIST. 

SAN FRANCISCO PLATING WORKS, 

653 & 655 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 
E. G. DENNISTON, Proprietor. 





W. H. 0HMEN,' 




Engine Works, 

109 & 111 Beale St. i 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Cheap Ore Pulverizer. 



Tliere is for sale in n,i„ city, by I. A. Heald, American 
Machine and Model Worts, Jll and 113 First St., a 
Rutherford Pulverizer, an improved revolving- barrel 
crusher, which was only used a f ew times and is as .rood 
as new. It will be sold very much below cost, and 
miners who are in need of such an appliance for a small 
mmo will do well to make inquiries concerning it It is 
suitable for a pulverizing mill tor powder or other unb- 
alances. Reference as to aboye can be had unon applying 
to this offlco. T •' * 



EXCELSIOR BLASTING POWDER, 

Manufactured by the 

EXCELSIOR POWDER COMPANY. 

This is no new, patent, non-explosive Safety Powder, but the Genuine 
Standard Nttro Glycerine Powder, as safe to use and handle as any other Nitro- 
Glycerine Powder manufactured. The fumes and gases, common in n i tro-elycerine 
powders, are destroyed, and do not leave the miner w'th headache or nausea. 

The powder is put up in cartridges of any size to sui*. the consumer, and is 
exploded in the samp manne- as all other high explosives; that is, by means of 
cap and fuse, or by electricity. It is not claimed for this powder that it ie a 
non-explosive, or safer than other nl'ro-ylycerine powder. All powder, and 
especially nitroglycerine powder, tbou'd he handled carefully. The EXCEL- 
SIOR POWDER is as safe, and for strength far surpasses any other powder on 
the market. Addre s all orders to 



r^ 



rpllE MOST EFFICIENT ANI) PRACTICAL MACHINE 
-*- ever invented for the service of Prospectors and 
others requiring the use of a Horse Power; possessing all 
the requirements of a first-class hoist and affording means 
for the continuous operation of a Pump or Blower without 
interfering with a hoisting apparatus. 

It is made entirely of Iron; no piece weighs 
over 250 pounds. At the ordinary speed of a horse a 
1,000-pound bucket of ore may he raised 12o feet per 
minute. The hoisting drum is underthe complete control 
of the man at the shaft, and is capable of carrying 50 ° 
feet of five-eighths steel rope. The cost of erection is 
slight, as two men in half a day can easily put it in place 
ready for work. 

While thi power is more particularly for mining pur- 
poses, it is equally adapted to all other uses where animal 
power is required. £3' SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 
Address 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

Rankin, Brayton & Co., 

SAN FRANCISCO - AND - CHICAGO. 



Only "PEBBLE" Establishment. 




EXCELSIOR POWDER 

Room 9, No. 3 California St., 



COMPANY, 

San Francisco, Cal 



Reliance Machine Works, 

CLOT & MEESE, 

Sole Licensed Manufacturers of the 

Medart Patent Wrought Rim Pulley 

For tho States of Californ ; a, Oregon aud Nevada, and the Territories of Idaho, Washington, 

Modtana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Lightest, Strongest, CheapeBt and 

Best Balanced Pulley in* tho World. AIbo Manufacturers of 

fat, oct. 25, 1881. SHAFTING, HANGERS AND APPURTENANCES. 

£STSbnd for Circular and Pricb List. T££ 

No?. 1 29 and 13 1 Fremont street, - »• • san FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Muller's Optical Depot, 

185 Montgomery St. near Bush 
SPECIALTY FOB. 33 TEARS, 



The most complicated cases of defect 
Ive vision thoroughly dlagnoBed, free ol 
charge. Orders by mail or express 
promptly attended to. 

Compound Astigmatic Lenses Mounted to 
Order. Two Hours Notice. 



JOHN L. BOONE, 

Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law, 

Rooms 7, 8 and 9, 

No. 820 California Street. S. F. t 

(Over Wells Fargo & Co.'s Bank. 

Special Attention Paid to Patent Law. 

N. B.— Mr. J, L. Hoone has been connected with the 
Patent business for over 15 years, and devotes himBelf 
almost exclusively to Patent litigation and kindred 
branches. 



Dewey & Co. { 



*5S. J Patent Agt's. 



July 14, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press 



NATIONAL COMPRESSORS and 




EDWARD A. RIX, Agent, 

18 and 20 Fremont Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

IROJST AND STEEL "WIHE HOISTING EOPES. 



ORE 

CAES. 



W I RE R OPE 

BRODER)CK&BASC0f»TR0PECD. 




ORE AND 

Water Buckets. I 



BELT 



HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL ENGINES Compressor?. 



vMtf 



1 to 100 Borae Power. 



KNIGHT'S 

Mining Water Wheel 

OVEB H>0 IN DM IN CAL. 



MINERS' HORSE-WHIM 



One Horn* can easily hoist over 1.000 pounds at a depth of 500 feet. The whim 

mainly built of wrought Iron. Tin- hoisting-drum ia throwo out of gear by the 

lever, while the load Is held in place with a brake by the man tending the 

ducket. The standard of the whim Is bulted to bcd-tlinberp, thur avoiding all (ram 

work. When required these whims are made in auctions to iwck ou mule*. 

NATIONAL DUPLEX COMPRESSOR. 





H. P. GREGORY & CO., 



Importers and Dealers in Machinery and Supplies. 



The Kortiiiir's Injector is the simplest, 
cheapest and best in use. Will draft its 
own water, ^ot or cold, and feed under 
varying: prossure Send for Circu.ar. 



Nos. 2 and 4 California Street, S. F. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 




J. A. Fay & Co., Wood Work- 
ing Machinery. 

Bement & Son's Machinists 
Toole. 

Blake's Steam Pumps. 

Perry's Centrifugal Pumpa. 

Gould's Hand & Power Pumps [/ 

Perrin's Band Saw Blades. || 

Payne's Vertical and Horizontal 
Steam Engines. 

Williamson Bros. Hoisting En- 
gines. 

New Haven Machine Co.'s Ma- 
chinists' Tools. 

Otto Silent Gas EngincB. 




Hoisting Engines 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

Sturtevant's Blowers and Ex- 
hausts. 
Judson's Steam Governors. 
Pickering's Steam Governors. 
Tanite Co. Emery Wheels. 
Nathan & Dreyfus' Oilers. 
Korting's Injectors and Ejec- 
tors. 
Diaston's Circular Saws. 
Frank & Co.'s Wood Workiug 
Machinery. 
i New York Belting & Packing 
Co.'s Rubber Belting, Hose~ 
Packing, etc. 
Ballard's Oak Tanned Leather 
Belting, 




BLAKE STEAM PUMP. 
More Than 1 G, 000 in Use. 







L. C. MARSHUTZ. 



T. G. CANTRELL 



National Iron Works, 

Northwest Cor. Main and. Howard Sta., San Francisco,. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

IMPEOVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES 

At Greatly Reduced Prices. 

HOME INDUSTRY I ALL WORK TESTED AND GUARANTEED ! 

Stationary and Compound Engines, Flour, Sugar, Quartz and Saw Mills. An'alga 

iuatlng Macmoes 

CASTINGS AND FORGINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Sole Manufacturers of Kendall's Patent Ouartz Mills. 



Pacific Rolling Mill Co.. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

RAILROAD AND MERCHANT IRON, 

ROLLED BEAMS, ANGLE, CHANNEL AND T IRON, BRIDGE AND MACHINE BOLTS, LAG SCREWS, MCTi 
WASHERS, ETC., STEAMBOAT SHAFTS, CRANKS, PISTONS, CONNECTING RODS, ETC., ETC. 

Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Hammered Iron of Every Description. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON 
tr Orders Solicited and Promptly Executed. 

Office. No. SOii Mftrkut St.. ONION BiOl K. 



STEEL 
CASHES 



FROM 1-4 TO 10,000 lbs. WEIGHT. 

True to pattern, Bound and solid, of uneq.ualed strength, toughness and 
durability. , , 

An invaluable substitute for forginga or cast-iron requiring three-fold 
strength . 

Gearing of all kinds, Shoes, DieB, Hammerheads, CroBBheads for Loco- 
motives, etc. 

15,000 Crank Shafts and 10,000 Gear Wheels of this Steel now running 
prove its superiority over other Steel Castings. 

CRANK SHAFTS. SHOES, DIES and GEARING specialties. 

Ctroularo and Price Lists free. Address 

CHESTER STEEL CASTING CO., 

IVorlie, CHESTER. Pa. «H library St., FIJI! Ai>£iPHI.l 



JAS. LEFFELS TURBINE WATER WHEEL, 

The "Old Reliable," 

With Importaat Improvements, mukmeflit the 

MOST PERFECT TURBINE NOW IN USE, 

Comprising the Largest and the Smallest Wheels, under both the Highest and 

Lowest head used in thia country. Our new Illustrated Book sent free to those 
owning water power. 

ThoBe improving water power should not fail to write us for New Prices, before 
buying elsewhere. New Shops aud New Machinery are provided for mak:j^ this 
Wheel. Address 

JAMES LEFFEL <& CO., 

Springfield, Ohio, and 110 Liberty Street, New York City 
PARKE &. LACY. General Agents. 21 & 23 Fremnnt St... S. F. 





THE. CONSUMERS' COMPANY. 

VULCAN B B, 

Black. G-lazeci Po\7rd.er, 

In kegs and cases. The Best Low Grade Explosive in the market. Contains no Nitro 
Glycerine. Buperior to Judson or any Clack Powder made. 

Is Unequaled for Bank Blasting & Railroad Work. 

VULCAN NOS. I, 2 AND 3, 

The Strongest, Mont Uniform and best Nitro Glycerine Towder mttnu factured, au 
winch we are prepared to furnish at very lowest prices. 

Caps and Fuse of all Grades at Bottom Rates. 
VTTI.C.A.XT POWDER CO,, 

218 California St„ San Francisco, 




Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jdlt 14, 1883 



Mining Machinery Depot, 



2 1 and 23 Fremont Street S. F. 



NO. 7 IMPROVED 

AIE COMPRESSOR. 



With Adjustable Cut-off Poppet Valve Engine, and Forced Iron Crank Shafts. 



SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

Absolute certainty in the action of the valves at any speed. Perfect delivery of the air at any 
speed or pressure. The heating of the air entirely prevented at any pressure. Takes less water to 
cool the air than any other Compressor. 

Power applied to the best advantage. Access obtainable to all the valves by removing air chest 
covjrs. Entire absence of springs or friction to open or shut the valves. No val?-e stems to break 
and drop inside-of cylinders. 

Have no back or front heads to break. The only Machine that makes a perfect diagram. No 
expensive foundations required. Absolute economy in first cost and after working. 

Displacements in air cylinder perfect. Showing less leakage and friction than our competitors 
and a superior economy of about 20 per cent. 

Small Sizes made in Sections not to Exceed 300 lbs. 



JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS, 



Nos. 49 and 51 Fremont Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



DEALEBS I3ST - 



UNTES^rtT" j^nXT33 SSESOOI^TID 3E3C^3LKrX> MACHINERY 

OIF E"V r EIR,^2" VARIETY. 
Stationary, llllllli'" 




PULLEYS. 





Portable, and 

Hoisting Engines 
and Boilers. 

Improved Single and Double 

Circular Sawmills. 

SHINGLE MILLS. 

Steam Pumps of all Makes. 

Centrifugal Pumps. 
MINING PUMPS. 

BLOWERS 

AND 

% Exhaust Fans. 
i Leather and Rubber 

BELTING. 



MACHINISTS' TOOLS 



-COMPRISINI 



M 



mm 

h 
i 



Mil! 




LATHES, 

DRILL PRESSES, 

PLANERS, Etc 

WOODWORKING 

MACHINERY 

COMPRISING 

Band-Saws, 

Stickers, 
s§| Planers, 

Shapers, 
Etc., Etc. 




HANGERS. 




PATENT COUPLINGS. 



UPRIGHT ENGINES AND BOILERS. 



DUPLEX INJECTORS. 



INING, aUAETZ, AND SAWMILL MACHINERY. 

AUTOMATIC ORE-FEEDERS, HENDY AND TRIUMPH CONCENTRATORS. 

AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF 

Baker U-stary Pressure Blowers. Akron (Ohio) Hot-Polished Shafting, 

Wilbraham Rotaty Piston Pumps, Blaisdell & Co.'s Machinists' Tools. 



I,. M. STARR. 



0. H. MALTKR. 



/ETNA IRON WORKS, 

M \M FACTURERS OF 

IRON CASTINGS AND MACHINERY 
of all Kinds. 

MARINE, STEAM, AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Mining; Machinery a Specialty. 

217, 219, and 221 FEE MONT ST., - SAN FRANCISCO. 

MALTER, LIND & CO.-, Agents, 189 Broadway, New York. 




■TO- 



HYDRAULIC 

nVLTHXTEEtS; 



rpHK ABOVE CUT REPRESENTS OUR NKW IMPROVED GIANT. WHICH 
•*■ we recommend as being the Best Hydraulic Machine ever manufactured. 
They are Simpler, Lighter, Cheaper axd More Easily Worebd than any stylo 
heretofore made, The midline is tally proteeted by patents owned by us, nnil we 
will guarantee protection to our customers, iter Send for Circular and Price List. 

■w»».n» HOSKIISJ- BEOS., 

JIARYSV1LLE '.CALIFORNIA. 




w 

An Illustrated 



BY DEWEY & CO., 
Publishers. 



The Dyer Cannon Ball Uuartz Mill 



We proeonl on thi ! 

.i.. oi quarto crusher, called the Dyer 

q Ball mill. 

ring to the cut, \ i a hopper through 

which the quarto enters the cylinder or rock 

l; l;. the top section and upper shaft 

of cylinder, is in o and has no 

connection with the cone or machinery working 

the mill. 

( I, c ■_', c :; and ' actions "f hard 
iolt ' together, as Bhown, which com- 
prise tho cylinder. 'I'll'- lower section, C I is 
curved in I according to .1 u 1 
tain rule with tli<' cone, and constitutes the 
principal wearing pari oi the cylinder, and as 
11 above it takes its place, 
and so on continuously. I', escape of crushed 
quarto from the rook-breaker. I''., where it de- 
scends to the balls, boneath which, when 
further pulverized, it passes through the 
screen. I 

What is termed tin cone, not shown in the 
cut, is provided with a "shoe" to renew the 
wearing parts, and is the only -section directly 
acted "ii by the power driving the mill. 

The cylinder ami cone, which together con- 
stitute the rock breaker, rests upon a scries of 
hard iron halls in circular grooved tracks above 
and below, moving or rotating freely upon 
them, ami turning together in the same direc- 
tion. Upon the introduction of the quarto, the 
cylinder ami cone close continuously upon it, 
1 si it a terrible force, and the rock breaks up 
from point to point until it finally falls out 
through the discharge space of such degree of 
fineness as desired. From this point the crushed 
quartz passes beneath the balls, and is further 
crushed by the weight of nearly the whole mill 
upon them, and the crushing force of the rock 
breaker combined; the pulverizing is there fin- 
ished and passes through the screen. 

It will lie seen that every part of this machine 
does some work; there arc no idle pieces, even 
the weight as a whole contributing largely to 
the operation. 

For this quart/, crusher the inventor claims 
the following advantages as compared with 
stamps : 

Less cost, wear and weight, and less power 
to run it, the reduction being from forty to 
eighty per cent. Being light ami made in sec 



pounds, costs $350; No. 2, capacity I- tons, 
weight I. .~>:ni pounds, $600. Larger mills in 
proportion. Two smaller sizes than No. 1 are 
made, ami ..I il",iil olHlaii.l SOU pi.unds weight. 

ami of aliiuit I '. to :> tons capacity respectively. 
These an' convenient for prospecting, etc. far 
tiis interested in ore crushing can see these 
mills in operation at No. 520 filth street, where 
invited to call and witness the same. 
One of tlu-'iti has been running for several 
mouths near Iowa Hill, Placer county; also one 
at Grizzly flat, Kl Dorado county: whence 
1 11 favorable accounts of the work done by 
them. A number of the machines have been 



Working Miners and Bullion Pro- 
duction. 

According to the last report of the Director 
"I tin Mint, the number of men at work in the 
mines of California in IKS2 amounted to :i7,147, 
lioing much the largest number so employed in 
any of the States or Territories of the Union, 
Colorado, with 2.s. 11711, ran king next in this respect. 
While tho bullion product of Colorado for that year 
reached Sill, .Slid, 000, that of California amounted 
to only $17,045,000; the smaller number of men 
employed producing in this instance the larger 
amount of bullion. Generally, this would be 



tions this machinery can be packed into locali 
ties where ordinary quartz mills could not be 
taken. The cannon ball crusher is simple, com- 
pact and strong, not liable to get out of order, 
and almost any one being able to run it. farts 
that wear out most readily are easily replaced. 

The movement is rotary, crushing (not grind- 
ing) either wet or dry equally well, and running 
in either direction the same, funs light, makes 
but Utile noise, and does not injure by running 
empty. Will crush according to power used, 
readily geared for steam, water or horse power, 
and can be mn by hurdygurdy wheel on pinion 
shaft. Occupies but little space. Is quickly 
set up and removed. Will take in good size 
quartz, dispensing with rock breaker where this 
is an olqect or necessary; leaves the gold blight 
and easy to amalgamate, and can be cleaned up 
in a few minutes; the discharge ample, and but 
little wear on the screen, no coarse quartz^com- 
ing in contact with it. The frame can be con- 
structed where used, thereby saving freight. 

Several of these mills have been put up and 
are now running at different points in the mines, 
and are said to give entire satisfaction. A num- 
ber more are now being built at the Globe 
foundry in tbis city, to fill orders from the in- 
terior. The prices of these mills vary with 
size. No. 1, capacity (i tons, .weight 2,500 




DYER CANNON 



BALL QUARTZ MILL. 



ordered by mine owners about Grass Valley, and 
elsewhere in Nevada anil adjacent counties. 
As this mill seems to meet a long standing want 
of our quartz miners — something cheap, durable 
and portable — we should be glad to be kept 
fully advised as to results of further trials of 
its merits. 



Bkssemek Cast Steel. — It is said that the 
first cast of Bessemer 3teel in America, was 
made on the 7th of May,' last, at the Pennsyl- 
vania Steel works, Harrisburg, fa. The pig 
iron contained two and a half per cent of phos- 
phorus, and was made from a mixture of South 
mountain ore and mill cinder. The resulting 
steel contained only 0.04 phosphorus and 0.12 
carbon. The steel was made in the old plant 
of the works named, which has two seven-ton 
converters, the pig being re-melted in a eupola. 
Several heats were made last week with com- 
plete success. 



construed to the prejudice of California; so, 
however, we do not view it. We have not in 
this State, as they have in Colorado, Nevada, 
Utah and Arizona, any mining companies mak- 
ing an inordinately large and profitable produc- 
tion of bullion. There is not in the State a 
single company whose gross annual product 
reaches half a million dollars. But we have a 
good many companies who are making very fair, 
and in some cases large net earnings on the 
amount of capital invested. 

With us the profits of mining are widely dis- 
tributed. A high percentage of those here en- 
gaged in the business are self-employers. They 
own the claims they work, and any resultant 
profit inures to themselves. This class of min- 
ers is probably twice as numerous here as in 
Colorado. This is due to the habits of our peo. 
pie, coupled with the diversified character of our 



VOLUME XLVII 
Number 3. 

auriferous deposits and the various methods 01 
working them. The old Califomian dislikes t" 
work for wages. Mr would rather In- his own boss 
though he cam not over a dollar per day. than 
to receive two on hire. Then, our gold mines 
are so extensive and varied in form that they 
give room for a large working population. In 
each department of the business we have many 
different kinds of deposits. In quartz mining 
we have regular veins, seams and bunch de- 
posits. In placer mining we have hydraulic, 
drift, river-bed, gulch, beach and divers other 
forms of operating. In the prosecution of some 
of these branches but little outlay for plant or 
apparatus is required, so that the man of small 
means, if so inclined, can very often engage in 
them to advantage. 

As a consequence of these conditions the I al- 
ifornia miner is apttobethepossessor of a home, 
generally comfortable and sometimes almost 
luxurious. He has usually a well-built house 
with a garden and fruit trees about his dwelling. 
Wry often these men own and cultivate a con- 
siderable tract of land. Fruit, grain and cattle 
growing is made a part of their business, being 
looked after at such times as mining does ii"t 
require their attention. Along the entire main 
gold belt of California, fruits of most kinds anil 
of fine quality can be grown with the greatest 
facility. Fair crops of hay and grain can also 
be raised here without much trouble. Water is 
good, fuel and lumber cheap, and the climate 
uncqualed for salubrity. Through the con- 
struction of railways and good wagon roads, 
nearly all the mining districts of this State are 
now easily accessible. Enjoying so much that 
is essential to their comfort and happiness, the 
California miner is incomparably better off 
than the fraternity elsewhere, even though his 
average earnings be not quite so great. So, 
too, the bullion product of our State, though it 
suffer by comparison with some of our neigh- 
bors, serves no doubt a more beneficent purpose 
than the much larger amounts taken out by 
them. 

Product of Quicksilver During the Past 
Year. 

We are indebted to Air. J. B. Uandol, agent 
of the New Almadcn mine, for the following 
table, showing the output of quicksilver by the 
several mines worked in this state during tho 
year ending June 30, IS83, and the total 
production made. Besides the properties 
named in this list, a few mines were worked in 
a small way, their entire yield being estimated 
by Mr. Eandol at only 671 tlasks. As this gen- 
tleman possesses superior facilities for obtain- 
ing correct data on the subject of quick- 
silver production in this State, and is careful 
in collecting the same, his figures and state- 
ments may lie accepted as authoritative : 

Minus, ' No. flasks. 

Napa l'"" J'Ui 

Great Western ■'"'!', 

Sulphur Bank ' •'.'■.".■ 

Rcddington -•■":: 

Great Eastern '■ ■ T'i',? 

New Idria I'i': 1 ,' 

New Alinadcn '-"■ ™ 

Various '" L 

Total 51,200 

Ax Oi.i> Electric Light Patent.— The 
first attempt to manufacture electric incandes- 
cent lamps, has been ascribed to M. de Chagny, 
whose operations were , said to have been con- 
ducted some twenty years ago. The credit of 
tho invention and its practical application, how- 
ever, are now claimed for a young American, 
Mr. Starr, whose patent was taken out in 184."i. 



34 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 21, 1883 



Correspondence. 

Ross Camp. 

Hassayampa District. A. T. 
[From our Arizona Correspondent.] 

Boss Camp, a part of the Hassayampa mining 
district, lies about twelve miles south of Pres- 
cott. It is very elevated, being situated at the 
head of the Hassayampa creek, and nearly as 
high as the Flint mines on the Union peak 
ridge, at the head of Jersey gulch. The country 
about the camp being a little lower, shows less 
gold and more silver, lead and copper, especially 
as the veins get below water level. 

In company with Col. Biglow, I first visited 
a singular kind of ore lying apart from the 
principal mines. The vein is very wide, thirty 
feet or more across, and some portions giving 
high assays of silver. 

This location, called the Sumner, has been 
developed by an open cut,runfortyfeet through 
hard slate. It shows a very strong lead, of sil- 
ver bearing ore, in conjunction with slices or 
kidneys of mineral resembling iron carburet, 
being in fact a micaceous iron. It is free from 
grit, very bright, and so soft as to rub fine be- 
tween the thumb and finger. 

The prospects here were so good that the 
owners were encouraged to go below and tunnel 
in to strike the vein. They encountered hard 
slate country rock, showing glittering iron sul- 
-phurets, the cost of tunneling amounting to 
about §12 per foot. They found similar indi- 
cations below as above. The whole ^ is yet a 
mystery and a new experience, awaiting coun- 
sel and cash for further prosecution, if the 
owners so advise. (This property is now bonded 
in the East.) Two miles north of this locality, 
over the ridge, is 

"The City of Mines," 
And I hereby copyright this name for this 
numerous family of separate leads, because if 
they were mapped off they would look like the 
streets of a town, with a main artery and many 
thoroughares. 

The Davis, a silver-bearing lode, and the 
largest of the group, is traceable for miles. The 
mines on either side of this lode keep mostly 
parallel to each other, and come to join the 
Davis at an acute angle. A visit of a few min- 
utes, passing hastily from one claim to another 
at different nights on the mountain, makes it 
risky to attempt any minute description of this 
city' of mines, all existing in a genuine practical 
and visible sense. They belong largely to the 
burro whacking prospectors. > The southerly and 
lower end of the Davis or Broadway is owned 
by Col. C. C. Bean and is well prospected by 
a tunnel '200 feet long. The supposed average 
assay value of the Davis ledge is given at $150; 
ledge five feet thick. 

Other Lodes and Average Assays. 

The Pearl, North Da vis and Dunkirk, all strong 
well-defined veins, are opening up with good 
ore. They are owned by Dr. Smith and Col. 
Biglow, who are now piling up ore on the Dun- 
kirk dump for shipment. Assays from the dark 
blue streak of the vein gave over §S00 per 
ton; §477 gold, balance silver. This streak is 
four to six inches thick. A vein adjoining as- 
says $282, $162 being gold, balance silver. The 
stratum here is about twelve inches thick. The 
iron streak on the west hanging wall, four to 
six inches, gave §35 gold, and sonic little 
silver. 

Near the above lodes lies the Esmeralda, with 
piles of ore all bright, clean and free from cab- 
rock. This lode belongs to Dan Hatz and Don 
Nejia, who manage the work, and can tell to a 
cent the assay value of the different classes of 
ore on the dump. Many of these consist of 
azurites with chlorides, some of which have 
assayed over $1,000 per ton. 

The Dosoris (wife's dower) is another, and 
favorite lode, carrying many kinds of rich ore, 
some nearly native silver itself. It is prophe- 
sied here that this mine will yet make some 
man rich. 

Howell's Blue Dick forms one of the alley 
streets in this city of mines. It is idle, but 
filthy in lucre. It would be tedious to mention 
even a tenth of these well-named streets that 
promise in the early future to do each a whole- 
sale business, on square coin basis. Among the 
names of mines here are those of nearly all the 
presidents, the birds of the air, and the States 
of the Union. 

The old Senator mine, on the east side of the 
mountain, is also entitled to notice, seeing it 
has on many accounts besides its age, claims to 
honorable mention. Its ample development of 
200 feet deep shows bidden treasures of gold to 
the amount of $160,000. The Senator, when 
on duty, speaks through the rappings of a ten- 
stamp mill, 

Robert M. Hansen, a lad fourteen years old, 
has just discovered a fine galena silver vein, 
and bridged the faulty law by locating it in the 
name of his mother. The claim is traceable 
700 feet in outcrops, and is found in excellent 
company. This clever lad was the first child 
born of a white mother in White Pine, Nevada, 
and must be a natural miner. 

From the divide above these claims, Dr. 
* Smith proposed "to play satan on me" by point- 
ing out the vast wealth of the surrounding 
country and attempting to awaken in me j a 
foolish desire to possess myself of the same, 
ficlow us was Slate creek, a branch of the 



Hassayampa, noted for the fact that this city 
of mines is located at its head branches. Be- 
yond is the deep gorge of the big Hassayampa 
and off towards the south Walnut grove, one 
of the prettiest ranches in the Territory, owned 
by A. Wade, in the early sixties a successful 
quartz-mill man at Dayton, Nev. A little to the 
westward lies Antelope Mt., site of one of the 
early gold excitements, and in which thousands 
of dollars were taken out in a single day, and 
this without water for washing. It is now 
proposed to buy this Walnut grove ranch for a 
great reservoir site, and work the grounds below, 
which are very rich, by the hydraulic method. 

Above and to right of Walnut is Peoples val- 
ley, named after one of the earliest settlers, still 
living there. Kirkland and Skull valleys fol- 
low. Just this side of Skull valley is Copper 
Basin, with Bradshaw peak named after Isaac 
Bradshaw, yet living and active, though carry- 
ing three-score years. He is widely known as 
"Uncle Ike," a title of respect. Bradshaw has 
taken a great interest in locating and develop- 
ing the group of Copper Basin mines. Though 
strongly wedded to camp life, he retains his so- 
cial and urbane manners, making him many 
warm friends. His brother, a noted pioneer and 
prospector, for whom the Bradshaw range of 
mountains was named, lias been dead for many 
years. 

The lofty knob behind and towering over us 
is Bean's Peak, so-called in honor of Col. Bean, 
who did good service in the late war for the 
preservation of the Union, and isnowa resi- 
dent and large mine owner in this district. 
Things of the Past- 

In my recent visit to the Hassayampa district, 
I crossed the bed of a deep rocky creek, the 
well-worn rocks of which showed that it car- 
ried sometimes a great volume of water, though 
so little is running there now that a man can 
step across it. On the bank of this creek I no- 
ticed an old house, the remnants of a water- 
wheel, and an old arastra, the place being now 
deserted. But these remains denoted that here 
had been made an effort some time ago to work 
the quartz, of which there is plenty and good 
looking in the neighborhood. This work was 
done before the present well-graded wagon- 
road, leading into the district, was built, and at 
a time when everything had to be packed in on 
animals. That the enterprise was abandoned 
does not prove the ores to have been lacking, or 
of poor quality, but only that there were too 
many obstacles to be contended with at that 
day to warrant the miner continuing his 
efforts. I know not the history of this plant, 
but just such small beginnings that often seem 
failures, and do bankrupt first parties, are the 
startings that in these frontier countries finally 
result in wagon-roads, quartz mills, saw-mills 
and towns. Then follow the continental rail- 
roads ami their various branches, and the 
mountains and valleys are made to yield up 
their wealth and help to furnish the means for 
luxury and refinement, here and elsewhere. 
The prospector shows the place for profitable 
investments, though too often he reaps little of 
the benefits of the great treasures he discovers. 
The rich and poor can and should mutually 
benefit each other. 

Passing onwardand upward two miles the wagon 
road mentioned leads to themining claims of Wm. 
C. Flint, formerly of San Francisco, now pleas- 
antly located in this section over 7,000 feet 
above sea level in the midst of heavy pine for- 
ests, cool waters, and grand distant views. 
While in the Hassayampa country, I visited 

The Delaware Mine, 
Located on the top of a high ridge, and lying 
northeast and southwest. It is a large, well- 
defined ledge six feet wide, with ore vein of 
about two feet; rock, rusty decomposed quartz, 
carrying gold, silver, lead and copper, and will 
work $25 to S30 per ton. The vein has a regular 
course, and dips about SO degrees, being nearly 
perpendicular. On this vein cuts and shafts 
have been made at various points to prove the 
continuity of the ore; one shaft is fifty feet deep. 
From this point to the southeast, across a ra- 
vine, in plain view, are 

The Crook and Providentia Mine', 
Supposed to run into this point. The Crook 
mine, which has produced considerable bullion, 
has a small prospect mill a few miles distant on the 
east branch of the Hassayampa now idle. The 
property belongs to Mr. Buffum, merchant in 
Prescott, and is reputed to be valuable. It is not 
free milling ore. The Delaware, at the extreme 
southwest end of location, has an open cut show- 
ing estimated $o0 ore; 100 feet from this cut is 
a fifteen-foot shaft, the ledge growing to the 
thicknets of five and a half feet at bottom of 
shaft. Mr. Flint has spent his labor on various 
points, and enough of it to show good looking 
mineral extending all through this 1,500 foot 
location. 

The locality is easily aces iMe from the 
main road by a good wagon road leading one-half 
a mile through a beautiful pine forest, in which 
is excellent pasture and good water. But my 
pilot moves on to show me his other mine, 

The Grosvenor. 
Gold and silver, located near by, and also well 
shaded with cooling pines. "This is my south 
monument; here you see the course of the vein," 
etc., as an enthusiastic miner will talk when he 
thinks his text is solid. "This shaft is 500 feet 
from that south monument, is thirty feet deep 
all in ledge matter; from the croppings not less 
than twelve feet thick from wall to wall." This 
rock, a rusty, porous quartz, prospects well by 
the pan, but none of it has been milled. 

Passing north by some small shafts and cuts, 



we arrive at the main shaft of the Grosvenor, 
50 feet deep with a 50-foot level run south 
from the bottom. Descending this shaft, the 
vein is found to be about three feet thick, giv- 
ing evidence of a good mine. The site of this 
lode being 7,666 feet above sea level we get here 
a fine view of the country for a great distance 
around. These are supposed to be the highest 
mines worked in the Territory. Looking off 
we see to the west of Prescott the Senator gold 
mine, owned byC. P. Head and Hugo Richards, 
and in nearly the same direction is the Dosoris 
silver mine, owned by a New York company ; 
also the Blue Dick silver mine, owned by the 
Howell Smelting and Milling Company, at 
Lynx creek. A little further south is the Davis 
silver and gold mine of C. C. Bean, and Dan 
Hatz mine, with many more well developed 
claims at the head of Slate creek, a branch of 
the main Hassayampa. The Davis and Hatz 
ores of high gradehavebeen reduced at Howell's 
works. Looking north is the head of Lynx 
creek— a heavy range of smooth mountain, cov- 
ered with pine fit for lumber, mining timbers, 
fuel, etc. There are in that direction several 
good mines. 

On the north slope of this range is located a 
mine and mill, owned by a Chicago company, 
who paid $1 10,000 for the mine, on which they 
have put up a Huntington oscillating crusher 
mill ; also Wadleigh & Co. 's mine and mill of 
five stamps, and on the same lead as the Gros- 
venor, and only two miles distant. A little to 
the eastward of north is the Maj. Dakes 
group of mines, and a little below, his smelting 
works and saw-mill. Close to him is the Belle 
mine and Howell's reduction works, and the 
new town Howell. 

Those valleys seen off through the low divide 
are good stock and farming valleys, and away 
beyond — seventy -five miles — are the San Fran- 
cisco mountains. To the southeast is Turkey 
creek. Now who would not like to do up Ari- 
zona from one of these lofty shaded mounts ? I 
do not blame our zealous California botanizers 
— J. G. Lenimon and wife — for making Arizona 
mountains a part of their home-station each 
year. I found in a garden at Copper mountain 
the wild potato discovered by him, now under 
cultivation by Mr. G. W. Hill, who hopes to 
develop it to useful size. Mr. H. remarked, as 
he showed it to me: "It's the prettiest thing 
you ever saw, as smooth as an egg; can't see 
any eyes till they sprout out." 

Looking east, Mr. Flint, my guide, pointed 
out a high summit called Mt. Union. Eleva- 
tion, 0,000 feet ; the highest point in this re- 
gion. The tourist can gain a grand panoramic 
view from this summit, and have no rocks to 
climb and no underbrush to ruffle his temper; 
shady, and perfectly luxurious for open air 
sleeping. 

Descending the mountain about 200 feet wc 
arrive at 

The Fremont Mine, 
With three shafts, twenty feet, twenty-five 
feet and forty feet deep, and three tunnels, 
twelve, twenty -five and thirty -five feet in 
length, all in vein matter and ore plainly trace- 
able for 1,500 feet. Below the Grosvenor and 
Fremont joint tunnel is a good site for reduc- 
tion works, with wood for years. 

On the Grosvenor lode two tunnels have been 
run, one forty and the other 200 feet long, all 
in ore and vein matter. 

Average samples of ore from these mines as- 
say $40 per ton. Fifty tons worked gave 
good results. It is gold bearing, free, and pre- 
sents a good appearance to the eye. 
"What Pluck will Do. 

Mr. Flint met with reverses a few years since 
in San Francisco, and gave up everything, and 
landed in Prescott with less than one dollar 
cash capital. He proceeded at once to the 
mines, where he now has control of the property 
I have described. He has done the most if 
not all of this work, and it is well done too. He 
has now, after all these years of toil, a valuable 
compact mining estate, thoroughly prospected 
and ready for a company with means to employ 
skilled operatives and put up proper reduction 
works. With these conditions fulfilled, success 
is certain. This is one of many claims of varied 
character scattered through this belt now easily 
reached, the Arizona & Pacific railroad run- 
ning sixty miles north and the Southern Pa- 
cific 145 miles to the south. The reason these 
mines have not sooner been developed is that 
the cost of doing so prior to the advent of the 
railroads has been too great, there being long 
stretches of sandy deserts to cross, and the In- 
dians in former days giving much trouble. 

Then the question is simply as to the value of 
ore thus exposed. A party desiring such in- 
formation sent Mr. Kiggs as expert to sample 
for average as well as he could; so he picked 
from different points clear across the ore stratum 
from wall to wall, which was assayed by Mr. 
Blake, of Prescott, and acknowledged to go §24, 
with a slight suspicion that all doubts were con- 
strued against the ore. Some fifty tons were 
worked. B. W. Crowell. 

Prescott, Arizona. 



or experimenting upon the method of working 
has been done, consequently, metallurgists have 
given the subject but little study; however, I 
desire to correct the above by a few facts which 
came under my observation. 

In the fall of 1S81 I sent to Mr. Charles 
Bell, of Sacramento city, ten samples of copper 
carbonate, for assay. Among them were two 
samples, one of deep apple green, the other a 
dark gray, intermixed with manganese. These 
samples proved upon analysis to he a fine grade 
of nickel. Upon this showing, Wm. S. Bell, 
of Oakland, an experienced miner, came to my 
place, and we examined the country for miles, 
being rewarded by the discovery of the Table 
mountain and Cottonwood canyon mines, sam- 
ples of which were forwarded to Charles Bell, 
of Sacramento, who thoroughly analyzed them; 
also Edwin Booth, of San Francisco. Since 
that time Mr, Bell has been experimenting upon 
the feasibility of extracting the metal upon the 
ground; this he has accomplished, by smelting 
several bars of nickel from the ore as taken from 
the ledge, and a furnace of peculiar design is 
now being erected by Smith & Bell, in Sacra- 
mento city, in order to thoroughly demonstrate 
the practicability of erecting a smelter upon the 
mines, when we hope to asrain bring the State 
of Nevada into notice and renew the flush times 
of the Comstock, as their is no doubt but these 
nickel mines will open out far beyond all expec- 
tations, as large bodies have been exposed which 
grade from seven to thirty per cent. Work is 
being pushed forward as fast as possible, and 
the company are determined to leave nothing 
undone to thoroughly develop their property. 

Lovelocks, Nev., July 11, 18S3. L. 



More about Nickel. 

Editors Prksk: — In your issue of July 7th, 
I noticed an article on the metallurgy of nickel, 
by Mr. Geo. J. Rockwell, of Sacramento, who 
claims to be the first on the coast to produce a 
bar of nickel bullion by simply smelting it from 
the ore. As this character of mineral has but 
lately come into prominence, but little thought 



Assay Ton System of Weights. 

Walter Lee Brown, author of Brown's Man- 
ual of Assaying, writes on the above subject 
to the Chicago Mining Journal as follows: 

The so-called assay ton system of weights 
seems to be one of the bug-bears surrounding 
the art of assaying to many beginners, espe- 
cially those advanced in years and opposed to 
progress, and whose knowledge of weights is 
based entirely upon the arbitrary systems 
known as the Troy, Apothecaries' and Avoirdu- 
pois. There is no difficulity in understanding 
it, and I think my explanations will make the 
matter clear to all. 

The assay ton system is not restricted 
to any one system of weights — it can be ap- 
plied to all, be they in use in whatever country 
they may. 

First, then, to illustrate its use: An assayer 
weighs, of an ore to lie tested, wc will say 1 5 
A. T. (assay ton. ) Very well, as a result he 
obtains a bead of silver weighing 10 milli- 
grammes. If 1-5 A. T. produces 10 ingrs., 
( milligrammes ), 1 A. T. of the ore will produce 
10x5 = 50 mgrs. of silver, and the assayer re- 
ports the ore as carrying 50 ounces of silver to 
every ton. The simplicity of the arithmetic, 
rapidity of calculation, and difficulty of mak- 
ing mistakes are all apparent here; but let us 
see where he obtained his starting weight of 
1-5 A. T., and what relation it bears to the 
well-known ton. 

In this particular case the French or metric 
system of weights is the one employed as a 
basis; but that is immaterial, as will be shown 
further along. To proceed: J ton Avoirdupois 
-2,000 pounds Avoirdupois; 1 pound Avoirdu- 
pois = 7,000 grains Troy; therefore, 1 ton Avoir- 
dupois = 7,000 x 2,000= 14,000,000 grains Troy; 
1 ounce Troy = 4S0 grains Troy; hence, 14,000,- 
000-^480 = 29, 166 ounces Troy in 1 ton Avoir- 
dupois. 

Now, the assay unit, called the assay ton, is 
(in this case) a weight of 20,166 grammes (a 
gramme being equal to 15.4 grains Troy), or, (1 
gramme being equivalent to 1,000 milligrammes) 
29,166 milligrammes. Hence the relation of 
mi lligra mines to ounces is as 1 to 1— hi other 
words, a milligramme corresponds to an ounce; 
so that if by assay of 1 A. T. of the ore we ob- 
tain gold or silver to the amount of 4 milli- 
grammes, then, without any calculation, we 
know the ore will run 4 ounces to the ton. 

The above calculation starts out witli the 
short or American ton of 2,000 i>ounds. The 
long or British ton weighs 2,240 pounds, but 
we can use it in like manner as a factor, thus: 
7,000 ■ 2,240 = 15,6S0,000; 15,0*0,000-^- 480^ 
32,666. 

Hence the unit of an assay ton system for 
Great Britain or Canada, based on the ton of 
2,240 pounds, would weigh 32.666 grammes, 
and accordingly as we took fractions or multi- 
ples of it in assaying ores, so would our result- 
ant beads of the precious metals be fractions or 
multiples of an ounce per the long ton. 

Those who may object to the metric system 
can still use the assay ton system by making 
the unit a weight of 201.66 grains troy, or 
326.66 grains troy. In actual work it has been 
found that 1-5 A. T. of the gramme system, 
equals 5.S3grammes, equals 90.01 grains troy, is 
a good quantity of ore to use in an assay. An 
equivalent amount, or nearly so, in the grain 
assay ton system first given, would be A A, T. 
equal to 97.22 grains. 

The adoption of any system of assay ton 
weights avoids long calculations and the use of 
tables. By employing a whole number for the 
weight, then dividing the result by the said ' 
number and multiplying the quotient by 20,166 
or 32,666, we obtain the same figures as by the 
assay ton system, but this necessitates consid- 
erable multiplication or the use of previously 
prepared tables. 



Jolt 21, 1883. 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



35 



II}EGHy\N!cy\L Progress. 

Destruction of Steam Boilers. 

The l>: 

owing t" be the chief 

boilers; 

team boil* w on tin- outside i- 

principaUj due tu the action ol the beating 

ad ni the moist masonry. The product* 

frequently contain mlphur- 

id, which, in contact with moisture, i* 

grade ill ; into sulphuric acid, and 

■ 

the brick work can rusting. With 

a, the follow u 

bi noted: When an upper and lower 

boiler .!!-.■ nsed, the feed water i> let into the 

latter, w hioh th n ach Inst, and, there- 

i 
noticed thai I his boiler 

ok marked with little grooves. When 
fresh water containing air is warmed, little 
bobbles ol air containing niucti 

there is very little motion in tbu part of 
the boiler, they adhere to any rough ipota on 
the iron and are deetructM etoit ft i 
.h iron is attacked 
and, ol course, the action 
powerful in th themselves, If steam 

■ V 

iii .t steam boiler, where tin tern] 

\ ery high froti n it h hoi gases 

only, rusting will take place. Here, 

l water would be the 

gent. I fence, it" care is taken to 

water in motion circulating around in 

tin- boiler, the ohief cause of mtvni.il corrosion 

will be for the greater pari neutralized. Polyt. 

Sotiz, 

Finishing Files bv Sand Blast. It maybe 
of interest to state thai the chief value of the 
well known -sand blast method of sharpening 
files does noi consist so much in its application 
harpeningof old files, but in finishing 
new files that have just been cut. Experiments 
i it such files, submitted to the ac- 
; blast, exhibit greater resistance 
to wear and greater outting power than files as 
ordinarily made. In order, however^ to obtain 
definite figures as to their superiority, a scries 
of experiments were made some time ago, yield - 
following results: A new bastard file 
some fourteen inches long was finished on one 
bo I be ana blast method, while 
the other lide remained in its ordinary state, 
■stilt another file of the Bame dimensions, and 
which had been in use for some time, was 
sharpened by a sand blast, and three pieces of 
j'Mi metal of exactly the same size and the same 
il i "i i were then operated upon, until 
finaUi one of the three cutting surfaces of the 
two files were found useless for further work. 
They were then used on east iron, wrought iron 
and steel, and in each case it was found that 
the nrdinury file gave out long before the others. 
The ordinary tile was completely worn out dur- 
ing the trials, while those which had been sub- 
jected to the sand blast were still in condition 
for further use. It may also be remarked that 
Mr. 1'iiedr. Krupp, of Essen, Germany, has in- 
troduced the method in his works. 



Rolling Cold Iron.— The process of rolling 
eold iron owes its discovery to merest accident. 
A foundryman, a workman at the rolls, neg- 
lected to take his tongs from a bar of heated 
iron in time, and they were carried through the 
rolls. Much to his surprise, the tongs, instead 
of being broken in passing through the rolls, 
Merc reduced to the same gauge as the heated 
bar, and shone like steel. The workman called 
the attention of the superintendent to what he 
thought was merely a " funny'' circumstance; 
but the superintendent jumped at the conclu- 
sion that if it were possible to roll iron cold 
once it could be done again. He commenced to 
experiment, and had not gone far before he dis- 
covered that eold rolled iron was in every re- 
spect the equal of steel for shafting purposes, 
and in some respects it is superior, as it is more 
easily turned to any desired size than steel. 
Other discoveries followed this, and the process 
for rolling iron cold was patented. 

How to Anneal Small Castings. — A corre- 
spondent of Cotton, Wool and Iron says: Have 
sonic cast iron boxes made, say six inches wide 
by six inches deep, by twelve inches long and 
one half inch thick, without covers. In these 
boxes first put a layer of cast iron turnings, 
about one half inch thick; then a layer of cast- 
ings, packing them as close as possible, and fill 
all the space between the eastings with turn- 
ings. Fill the box in the above manner with 
castings to within one inch of the top, which 
Kll even full with the turnings. Heat the whole 
to a cherry red, and let them cool off slowly. I 
have repeatedly annealed castings that were not 
over three thirty-seconds of an inch in thick- 
ness, ami "as hard as glass," in the above man- 
ner with perfect success. 

Growing Competition ok the G-as Engine, 
-It is stated that English shops engaged in the 
manufacture of the lighter class of steam en- 
gines arc receiving very few orders for such 
work. It is also stated that this new falling off 
in such orders is mainly due to the increasing 
demand for improved gas engines of small ca- 
pacity, the manufacture of which is rapidly in- 
creasing. The gas engine in England, at any 
rate, is gradually, but surely, taking the place 
of the steam engine, where only a small driving 
power is required. 



I KL U nil Sort [KOH It is W< 11 

known that the hardest steel can i>, readily out 

ft iron. A grindstone ma 

readily made true with a bar of soft iron. The 

UiUet explains the philosophy of 

the tiling as follows: "The discovery is as old 

as Tubal Cain, the first knovi n cunning worker 

and metal. It is on the same princi 

pie that the barber cuts th-' superfluous steel 

edge of his razor, bv the same prinoi 
pie oi abrasion, \* Ithout ascribing any magneti 
cal attraction to ids strap. A small, sharp 

i water nover fails to cut the hardest 
rock it meets with; in short, all rivers form 
their beds by the same power of abrasion, or 
friction. Supp was si\, eight 

inches in diameter, and only one-twentieth of 
.oi inch thick, it n ould occupy 
bin mi the materia) to be out; every particle of 
thai line would be subjected to many yards of 

, l-y th-- rotary motion ol the outting 
wheel, and no two particles of the line could be 
touched time by any round wheel; 

if tin' wheel were hud it would not out so 
well, but glide over; but the rile, or san 
hard, makes no difference here, because each 
particle, on beiug subjected to the current of 

rrii ti< 'ii. '■- in ; mi. s softened, and Bert ei to 

■ the flash of sparks seen on Buch occa 

[> it Possible to Cast "Chain? -A corre- 
spondent of Cotton, Wool and Iron asks this 
question, "Is it possible b» cast a chain, and if 
so, how should tin- pattern bemade and molded? 
Although we are living in an age when iron is 
op forged and welded in all variety of 

Shapes, still all this is threatened to be set aside 

by tin facility with which steel is being fist 
into every variety of forms, and if a chain can 
be east from one kind of metal without much 
trouble, why not of cast steel, which is both 
strong and enduring, and set aside the trouble 

of forging and the difficulties in welding the 
short links for a chain ?" In this connection we 
may remark that a die for welding links has 
recently been patented by Mr. Frank A. 
bblings, of Warren, O. The die relates specially 
to the welding of links used in railroad ear 
couplings, liy a peculiar construction of weld- 
ing dies, increased facility is afforded for open- 
ing the dies when necessary to remove the 
welded link. A finishing die is likewise pro- 
vided, which operates in connection with the 
welding die. 

( ' \si Hardening. — Probably no better 
method of case hardening can be employed than 
that of packing the article to be hardened in a 
box or crucible with the carbonizing materials — 
ground bone or animal charcoal— luting the ves- 
sel tight, and exposing it for several hours to a 
red heat. In large establishments, where case 
hardening is a daily duty, ovens and special ap- 
pliances are always at hand. But when there 
is only one piece to be treated, and the neces- 
sity for case hardening occurs only occasionally, 
a simpler method may serve. It is well to keep 
on hand for this purpose a powdered mixture 
of prussiatc of potash and bone black or animal 
charcoal, in equal proportions by quantity. 
This may be applied to the red hot iron, either 
as a powder, or as a paste made with oil or even 
mixed with water. 



Proukkss ok American Carriahe Indus- 
try. — A thoroughly made American pleasure 
carnage could not be had in this country in 
I860. We were obliged to import the springs 
and other steel work and most of the textile 
trimmings ; but as we now make as good steel 
as we import, and produce our own silks, 
fringes and tassels, we build our own carriages. 
Under protective duties we build, in the single 
State of Ohio, more pleasure carriages annually 
than are produced in Ureat Britain and France 
combined, and the returns of the census show 
the existence, in 1880, of more than 43,000 es- 
tablishments for the manufacture of carriages 
and smithing, which employed, in that year, 
105,000 hands, to whom were paid as wages, 
moretluin §38,000,000. 



Effects of Compression on the Hardness 
or' STEEL. — Mr. Lau reports that at the works 
of Saint Jacques, at Montluoon ; France, the 
method of compressing cast steel has been ap- 
plied on a large scale. The process consists of 
submitting the molten metal to the action of an 
hydraulic press which can exert a pressure of 
from about l.i,000 to '2'2, 000 pounds per square 
inch, the pressure being kept up until the ingot 
has solidified and cooled. The result of this 
method is a great increase in the strength of the 

etal. 

Suppose we wish to know the largest square 
that can be cut from a circular sheet of given 
size. To ascertain without measuring, multi- 
ply the diameter by 0.7071, and we have the 
side of a square that will be contained in the 
circle. This is a useful rule for all trades. Ma- 
hinists very often have occasion to use it; so 
do boiler makers and lumbermen.— JlFcchanival 
Engineer. 

LUBRIOAKT FOR Hkavy Bkakimis. — The fol- 
io wingjlu brie ant for heavy bearings will be found 
excellent : I dissolve the best white lead in good 
machine oil, make it pretty thick, take all the 
hard and clotty substance away, then add the 
emainder, and you will find this a good lubri- 
cant. 

American Plumbing. — British architects ap- 
pear to concede that plumbing and other sani- 
tary arrangements of American houses are far 
better than those of the English. 




Photographing the Solar Corona. 

■ d-d, by the aid ol 

ite, in photo 
graphing tin- corona. 

, with a focal distance of tin 

half feet, In- obtains .i very distinct photo 

graphic image of the sun. without any | 

t. w hen tin exposure is verj rapid. 

■ ! ound th"- -nil. under suits- 

■ littcno of iiiuiinii iti c the int'-ri- 1 

which is more regular in form than the 

exterior oprona, and which extends about a 

quarter of a hi un 

imago. An exposure a Little Less rapid pro. 
sal of the photographic in 

the bud; the intei tore Bd in the 

exterior, which appears black, as in a noga- 
ii\ ' proof. If the t bii Le longer, 

the !■ \ ersaJ is produced both in the Bolai 

and tu the QOrona, but not in tho.se parts of the 

plate which are affected by the atmospheric 
Light alone. A tteru ;irds the plate represents 
the corona in white, as in a positi 
the atmospheric light in black. Then the 
straight and curve. 1 lines, and the other VSI ied 
forma whiob characterize the corona, can be 
easily traced. Captain Abnoy has carefully 
compared these plates with those which were 
taken during the last total eclipse. lb does 
not doubt that Muggins is able to photograph the 
corona at any time without waiting for eclipses, 
which occur only fifteen times in a century. 
Tin in u method will enable observers, es- 
pecially in southern climates and at high eleva- 
tions, to make chia phenomenon, which is one 
of so great importance in solar research, the 
subject of daily study. -Complex Hendm, 



A Rem \kk w.i.i. S iuri \\. The Brazilian 
Minister at La Paz, Bolivia, has transmitted to 
his government at Rio Janeiro, photographs and 

drawings of a most extraordinary saurian, lately- 
killed ( near La Paz, but only after receiving 
thirty-six rifle halls. The dried body of the 
monster has also been preserved. The body is 
twelve meters long from snout to point of the 
tail, which latter is flattened. Besides the an- 
terior head, it has four meters behind, two small 
but completely formed heads (?) rising from the 
back. All three have much resemblance to the 
head of a dog. The legs are short and end in 
formidable claws. The legs, belly and lower 
part of the throat appear defended by a kind of 
scale armor, and all the back is protected by a 
still thicker and double cuirass, starting from 
behind the ears of the anterior head and contin- 
uing to the tail. The neck is long, and the belly 
large and almost dragging on the ground. Pro- 
fessor Oilveti, who examined the beast, thinks 
it is not a monster, but a member of a rare or 
almost lost species, as the Indians in some parts 
of Holivia use small earthen vases of identical 
shape, and probably copied from nature. Mr. 
William E. A. Axon, in a note giving the above 
to the Journal of Science, says : " If this ac- 
count should prove to be accurate, it would 
form a counterpart to the etching of the mam- 
moth, which forms so interesting a memorial of 
prehistoric art." 

Frenuh Academy Prizes. -The French Aca- 
demy of Sciences has recently published a list 
of the prizes offered by them for essa} 7 s on scien- 
tific subjects during this year and until ISSti. 
In applied mechanics the Fourneyron prize will 
be given for the best "study, both theoretical 
and experimental, of the different methods of 
transporting force to a distance." A grand 
prize will be awarded in 1S84 for a mathemati- 
cal solution of the problem " to perfect in some 
important point the theory of the application 
of electricity to the transmission of power.' 1 
The prize will consist of a medal valued at 3,- 
000 francs. The memoirs must be submitted 
to the secretary of the Academy before June 1, 
I8S4, and should lie anonymous, but accom- 
panied by a sealed envelope with the real name 
and address of the author. The Hordin prize, 
which was not awarded this year, is carried on 
to 1S85, and memoirs must be lodged before 
June 1st of that year. The subject is a "re- 
search into the origin of electricity in the at- 
mosphere, and the causes of the great develop- 
ment of electric phenomena in storm-clouds." 
The prize is a medal worth 3,000 francs. 

A New Food. — According to the Ch«miker 
Zeitung, M. Muller has evaporated skimmed 
milk in a vacuum, so as to obtain a permanent 
product, which can be preserved for many 
months in a dry atmosphere, and which has* val- 
uable alimentary properties. He thinks that 
it may be of great use in pastry, and in various 
kinds of bakiug, and the best sugar of milk can 
be made from it. The skimmed milk which is 
collected in dairies and cheese factories, is usu- 
ally given to animals or wasted in sewage; it 
contains, however, lai"ge quantities of salts, and 
particles of butter and caseine, wdiicheanbc util- 
ized by Muller's method. — Rev. Scientif. 

The QOESTioxis being seriously asked whether 
the increasing transfer of iron from the earth's 
interior to its surface, can have any influence 
upon the weather. It seems that, at least, the 
vast masses of iron that are being spread out in 
railways, bridges, etc., must affect the electric 
currents which move about the earth. Per- 
haps the cyclones becoming more frequent and 
destructive every year, and which are now 
■ecognized as electric storms, may be traced to 
this cause. 



To !>■ doisri kk 

ik Walls. -Dr. W. Q 
official at Schwarzenberg, has communicated to 

the technical pre--, oi < tarmany a simple | 
for the quantitatn e definiti ■ ee water 

which may be contained in a wall, i 
carrying out of this pr cess it i.- 
have a uu ika with glass 

stoppers. The ol about one-half to 

known 
weight A small portion of mortar sum 
till one of the Masks is taken from I i,, intern; l 
of the wall by boring with 

the Wail, pi Ol pa] h ing held under- 

neath, unpor- 

icles the flask is filled rapidly, and well 
closed with an indis rubber Btopper, In the 

laboratory the flask itself, as weU as th 

, is carefully dusted, the 

glass stopper is inserted and the Mask v. ■ 
i 

212 to 230 I', until the mortar is com 

pletely dry, this process usually taking se\eral 

hours. The flask is then alio wi inappa 

ratus specially designed for the purpose, and is 

again weighed. By deducth hi oi a 

esscl ai prei iouslj a u ertaini d), thi difference 

between the weight of the mortar before and 

ing Ifl arrived at, and tie pel a I 
moi tun i thus < bablished. 



PllOTOmi U'HINC Till \ ••' m l lie s 

attempts ha \ e 1 ii made in bmidou to phi 'i 

graph the human vocal organs in the I 

The principal object was to obtain a 
picture of the ligaments known as thi 

COrds, Wllioh are situated at the top of the 

larynx-. These can be viewed in the I 
scope, a small mirror, which when placed at the 
bacK of the throat boh oe at once to reflect light 
upon the membranes, and to form m image of 
them visible to the observer. With the aid of 
this instrument numerous observations have 
been made upon singers, and most, valuable in- 
formalioii has bei/n collected, but all previous 
efforts to obtain a photograph by substituting a. 
camera For the observer's eye have entirely 
failed. The difficulties were overcome by the 
useof a powerful Siemens electric lamp, supplied 
by a dynamo machine. By means of this light 
some excellent photographs were obtained of the 

laryngOSCOpic image. The patient in each ease 
was If err liehnke, at whose instance theexperi 
ments were made. 

Electricity, --The following not over well 
authenticated paragraph is floating about in the 
sea of newspaperdom: The most astonishing 
claim yet made in behalf of electricity is, that it 
has been proven possible to convey by it vi- 
brations of light, so that it is practicable not 
only to speak with a distant friend, but to see 
him. According to the ( Itago Times, 1 >r. 
( luidrah, of Victoria, has invented an appa- 
ratus, called by him the electroscope, which 
accomplishes this. The paper in question says 
that a public test of this instrument was made 
in Melbourne in the presence of some forty 
scientific and public men. Sitting in a dark 
room, they saw projected on a large disk of 
white burnished metal the race-course at Flcm- 
ington, with its myriad hosts of active beings. 
Each minute detail stood out with perfect 
fidelity to the original, and as they looked at 
the original picture through binocular glasses. 
it was ditiieult to imagine that they were not 
actually on the course itself, and moving among 
those whose actions they could so complctcly 
scan. 

Powkr ok THE WAVES. — The tremendous 
power of the sea waves has been illustrated at 
Wick, on the extreme northeast coast of Scot- 
land, where a breakwater was being built. It 
may give an idea of what wave power really 
can do. It was found that stones of ten tons 
weight were as pebbles to the waves, which 
have been nieasured to be fifty-two feet from 
the crest to the bottom of the trough. The outer 
end of the breakwater, where the storm beats 
most violently, was built of three courses of 
100-ton stones, laid on the rubble foundation ; 
next above these were three courses of large 
flat stones, and upon these a mass of concrete, 
built on the spot, of cement and rubble. The 
end of the breakwater was thought to be as 
immovable as the natural rock, yet the resident 
engineer saw it yield to the force of the waves, 
and swing around into the troubled waters in- 
side the pier. It gave way, not in fragments, 
but in one mass, as if it were a monolith. The 
displaced mass is estimated to weigh about 
1,850 tons. 



Rain now Glass. — The soap-bubble colors 
upon glass are produced by a vapor, which i.s 
deposited on the hot 'glass before it goes into 
the annealing oven. The vapor comes from a 
mixture of protochloride of tin, carbonate of 
baryta, and carbonate of strontium. It is said 
that the workmen of a Bohemian manufacturer, 
wishing to celebrate his arrival, kindled some 
Bengal lights in the annealing furnaces, and the 
pieces which were in the furnaces all became 
iridescent. The colors can be removed by hard 
rubbing. Messrs. Clemandot and Fremy pro- 
duced a pearly luster, like that of shells, by 
means of different chemical agents, chlorhydrie 
acid among others, under pressures of four, 
li: <■, or six atmospheres. They were thus able 
i n imitate the magnificent glasses of antiquity, 
which have become iridescent through the lapse 
of time. 



A Knowledge of drawing and use of tools 
is of iuealculable worth in all trades. 



36 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 21, 1883 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 

COMNCKD BV'BHY THURSDAY 1 'ROM AdVERTISKMBNTS IS MIXING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS AND OTI1KR S. F. JOURNALS. 



ASSESSMENTS-STOCKS ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS. 



<';ilif..n! 






I M i 



M I. 



Location. No. 

Nevada.. 26. 

Nevsi(lii..22. 

Nevada.. 16. 

Ncvit.la.-H. 

Nevada.. 19. 

....Nevada. 



Am't. Levied. Delin^'nt. S-vi,k. Seurbtary. 
Aug 27.. Wm. H. Watsoi 

Aul- 22. ,B Burns 

Aug IT. .KM Hall . 



25, .July 3. .Aug 7.. 
25... Time 27.. Aug 2.. 
25...Tuue21...Iuly 24 . 
50.. July 17. .Aug 20.. 
20. .July 11.. Aug 15.. 
20.. June 26.. Aug 4.. 
20.. June 15. July 19.. 
40.. June 16.. July 23.. 
5. 00.. June 5.. July 



.Sent S..A W Havens.... 
.Sept 5. -A W Havens. . . . 

.Sept 3..CPGordoii 

.Aug 9. .R Wegener 

Aug 10..T J Wattson 

.July 26.. W. Cunningham. 



20. .June 14. .July 19. . . . Aug 9. .0 E Elliott. . 



.Sept 3..W .1 Steivart. 

.Aug 20..p:MHall 

, Aug 13 . . A K Tmrhrow . . 



Nevada. .39.. 

Excelsior f> G M Co California. .22.. 

ExcelBiorD GMCo California.. 1.. 

Exclieyuer M <'" Nevada.. 19.. 

Exceluibr Water and M Co... California.. 5.. 

Grand Prize M Co Nevada.. 14.. 

i iould & Cuny M Co Nevada. .45. . 

Holmes M Oo Nevada.. 7.. 

Hale& Norcmss M Co Nevada.. 77.. 

Independence M Co Nevada. .11. . 

Justice M Co... Nevada. .39.. 

Mexican M Co Nevada. . 23. . 

Martin White M Co Nevada. .15. . 

Red Hill H M Co California.. 8.. 

Tip Top M Co Arizona.. 6.. 

Union Con M Co Nevada.. 25.. 

OTHER COMPANIES-NOT ON THE LIST3 OF THE BOARDS. 



60.. July 6.. Aug 11. 
25.. June 25.. July 27.. 
50.. June 15.. July 20.. 
30. .June 27. .July 30... 
50..Juue 7. .July 11.. 
30.. May 25.. June 28. . . 
10.. July 9.. Aug 13... 
50. .July 17.. Aug 22.. 
25. .July 9. .July 11.. 
05. .May 24. .June 26. . 
25 May 29.. July 6 
50, .July 17. .Aug 21.. 



Plauk of Business 
. . .302 Montgomery b 
. . 309 Montgomery s 

327 Pines 

...309 Montgomery v 
...309 Montgomery H 
.. . 309 Montgomery s 
.... .414 California E 

114 Davis? 

. . .326 Montgomery e 

327 Pines 

215 Sansome b 

327PineE 

309 Montgomery * 



4.ug 21. .CT Bridge 224 California s 

.Aug 2..SF Lightuer 309 Montgomery f 



July 23..J WPew. 

Sept 3. .RE Kelly 

.Sept 11.. CL McCoy 

.Aug S..J J Hcoville 

.July 23 E Hestres 

Aug 6 . . H Deas 

Sept 11. .J M Buffiugtorj, . 



310 Piue t 

....419 California E 
..309 Montgomery s 
..309 Montgomery .- 
,.32S Montgomery} 
. 309 Montgomery* 
309 California - 



Alexander M Co 

Alaska M Co 

Bald Mountain M Co 

< Continental C & I Co — 

Champion M Co 

Kintraeht G M Co 

Genesee M Co 

GoodshawMCo 

GoriUaM Co . 

Hazard Gravel MCo 

Hamburg M Co 

Homeward-hound M Co..., 

Lima Con M Co 

Pacirlic M & Reducing Co. . 

Roma Union MCo 

Sau Miguel Con M Co 

West Branch Feather River 



. . . .Nevada. 
..California, 
..California. 
. California. 
..California. 
, .California. 
. . California . 
..California. 
. .California. 
. .California. 

Nevada. 

..California. 

Arizona. 

. .California. 

Nevada . 

Mexico. 

M Co..Cal. 



1.00.. June 20. 

4.00. .June 7. 

3.. June 26 

05.. May 26 

10.. June 4 

05.. June 12. 

40... Tune 20. 

10.. June 6. 

10.. June 1. 

V... June 20. 

25".. May 24. 

05 .May 29. 

05. .June 11. 

25.. June 20. 

02. .June 18. 
1.00.. Apr 28. 

01.. July 16. 



Aug b. 

July 9, 
.July 27. 

July 5. 
.July 34 
.July 7. 
.July 30. 
.July 14. 
.July 7. 
.July 21. 
.July 2 
.July 10. 
.July 18. 
.July 25. 
.Aug 6. 
.June 4. 

Aug 20. 



..Aug 27. 
..July 28. 
..Aug 30. 
..July 24. 
..Aug 11. 
..Aug 3. 
..Aug 22. 
..Aug 4. 
. Aug 1. 
..Aug 10. 
..July 24. 
..July 28. 
..Aug 6. 
. . Aug 15 . 
..Aug 27. 
..July 22. 
..Sept 10. 



J K Warren 

,A Judsou 

,L Hhannahan 

.W E Greene 

.TWetzel 

.H Kuuz 

..TStedtfeld 

,C C Harvey 

.A A Euquist 

, J T McGeoghegan. 

.D A Jennings 

.A Bowie 

,RD Hopkins 

.J W Beviliug 

.F. X. Simon 

.C G Brooks 

.A B Paul 



..307 Montgomery; 
320 SauBomei 

..369Morjtgomerj 
..522 Montgomery 

209 Sausome 

419 California 

. .309 Montgomery sj 
. .436 Montgomery st 
318 Pine st 

401 California st 

. .314 Montgomery st 
. .436 Montgomery st 

413 California st 

518 Sanaome s t 

210 Front s* 

.328 Montgomery - 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Name of Company. Location. Secretary. Office in S. F. Meeting. Date, 

Benton Con M Co Nevada.. W H Watson 302 Montgomery st Annual July 25 

Champion M Co California,. B Biu-ris 309 Montgomery st Annual July 30 

McMiflian S M Oo Nevada.. J Morizio 328 Montgomery st Annual Aug 1 

Monumental Bar UHCn California.. J W Pew 310 Pine st Aunual July 27 

Silver Hill MCo Nevada.. J W Pew 310 Pine st Annual July 26 

LATEST DIVIDENDS -WITHIN THREE MONTHS. 

Name OF Company. Location. Secretary. Office in S. F. Amount. P. 

Kentuck MCo Nevada.. J W Pew 310 Pine st 

Navajo M Co Nevada.. J W Pew 310 Pine st 

Silver King M Co Arizona.. J Nash 315 California st 

Standard Con M Co .California. .Wm Willis 309 Montgomery st 



10 Tune 20 

25 May 14 

25 Tmieir. 

25 June 12 



Table of Highest and Lowest Sales in 
S. F. Stock Exchange. 



Name of 


Whkk 


Week 
Endihg 


Week 
Ending 


Week 










Company. 


June 27. 


July b. 


July 12. 


Julj 


19. 




1 75 


2.00 




1.801.b0 


2 00 


2 mi 


2.30 




4!> 


611 


40 


.4b! .7b 


1 I" 


.05 


.7.1 




55 


llll 


4b 


.b0! .4b 


.51! 




.4.1 




.3b 






.4b! .40 


.bl! 


..is 


.40 


Argeuta 

Belcher 

Balding 


.Id 


.20 


.10 


.lb .0b 


.10 




.05 


1.10 


1 211 ... . 


1.1b 1 lb 


1.2b 


1.20 


1.25 


4 05 


i'Mi'.iti 


4.204.25 


4 4b 


4.15 


4 40 


Bullion 


.90 


.95 




.75,.... 


.8b 




.85 




















,4!i 


on 




.50 .... 


.4b .35 


45 




.00 


1.0b 


.so 


.90 .00 


.80, .60 


.80 




.05 


.Id 








.25; .15 


20 


BoJie Tunnel 


.30 




.10 










lib .5 


.25 




.10 

.40 


.IS 




"M 


.10 


.lb .10 


lb 










2.76 
2.00 


2.003.00 
2.402.10 


3.853.30 
2.252.0b 


3.7b 3.3b 
2 2b 2.00 


3 SO 




1, lb 


Con. Imperial. 


.0b 


.101.... 


.10'.. 


.10.... 






,4b 


.55 


4b| .40 


.501 ,3b 


M> 




1.2b 


1.451.25 


1.30,1.40 


1.4b 1.30 


1 4b 




.60 
.20 


.85 .50 
.25.... 


.55.... 
.25.... 


.50.... 
1 


50 


Klko Con 


25 




. ill. 


S.004.10 


b.00'4.75 


0.004.50 


,i 00 


Eureka Tunnel 


.25 


.70.... 


.60!.... 


.60.... 






.20 


.30.... 


.25! .20 


.2b| .20 


■SO 




.0b 


.25 .05 


.io|...: 


.0b 1 .... 


05 


< ii.nl.l .<; Curry 


2.50 


2.802.2b 


2.452.40 


2 502.40 


3 05 


Hale & Norcross... 


b.2b 


7.00 6.00 


7 00 


bi' 


6J, 6) 


Of 






........ 










Independence 


.35 








M. . . . 


.50 


Julia 


.10 










Justice 


.15 


.20 .... 


2' 


.25 .... 




Jackson 




....!.... 






.3b.... 


50 


Kentuck 


:: 50 


...J 








2 60 


Martin "White 


.Ob 








.Obi.... 








1 










Mexican 


2 30 


"..lib 2.9J 


3 or 


V !IH 


3.ib|2.60 
0.005.00 


V 9b 


Mt. Diahlr> 


3 nil 


:; --. .... 




4 bll 


5 50 






























Northern Belle 


fi.50 


6J 63 


6,75 


On 


7.66.... 




North Noonday.... 














Navajo 


2.25 


4.202.90 


3 a: 


?, 40 


3 202,55 


3.10 


North Belle Isle.... 


3b 


.501. . .. 








35 


Occidental 


1 lib 


1.90 .... 


1 25 






1 50 


1 )|iliir 


2,2b 


2.90 2.25 


2.552.40 


2, lib 2.30 


?. 55 




.3b 


.40.... 




.40 .30 




Oro. 








['otosi 


] .2o 


1.404.2b 


1 40 


1 45 


l.bbl.50 


1 70 


Pinal I'tiu 




.80.... 






.011.... 


fib 


Savage 


i.au 


2.301.9b 


2 II 


1 9b 


2.05 2.10 


•', 4b 


Meg. Belcher 




,,..| 






3.00,.... 




Sierra Nevada 


3.011 


4.b0 3.bb 


3 81 


3 90 


4.453.65 


4 10 


Silver Hill 




05 












Silver King 


10 


10? 




If 


S bll 


9.75| 61 
.70 .55 


fi;; 


Scorpion 


.60 


:n: 






00 


6b 


Tuscarora 
















I r ninu Con 


4 3b 


ij 


4 40 


4 XI 


4 'III 


584.40 


4 9b 


rt;r, 


2 Ml 


■I. '.'0 2.7b 


■• HI 








Ward 

Wales 














Yell.." Jacket 


3.60 


4.1b 3.6b 


3190 


3.7b 


4.053.75 


4 00 



Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange 



THUK.S1 

300 Ar- 
um All 



!2b Bodiel 

1070 Chollar 

300 Crown Point.. 

780 California 

bn Con. Virginia. 

30 Eureka Con.., 

15*90 lv Mt. Diahlo. 

200 Gouhl& Curry 

;:nii Oraud Prize .. 

120 Hales Nor... 

100 Independence. 

IbO Mexican 

HKi Navajo . 



If vemian ', 

360 Savage'.'.'.'.'!!!!! 
600 Sierra Nevada. . 

llmi Senator 

in I'tah 

650 Cuion 

340 YellowJacket.. 



• Inly 19. 

Obi 

35c 

6bc 

3 70 

1.30l"1.3b 

10c 

40c 



!. 351*2.40 

!!!!!. i5c 

2.40 

.4.70@4! 

,3.obc»:i 



Altn... 
All In. 
Argeuti 



i lb 



us SESSION. 

7bc 

2.20 

Obc 

3bc 

Cher 4,15 

40c 

3.bb'"3,6b 

..40c 



ut. 



Bureks 

Eureka Tunnel 60c 

Bjcheiiuer 40o 

i'.l Dorado 35 c 

Gould .v rurrY.2.9IK"2 9b 
Grand Prize... 
Hule.x Nor... 

Navajo 

Ophir 

I Ivennan 

Putosi 

Silver King . 
Sierra Nevada 

Union Con 

Utah 

Yellow .Tucket 



.Obc 

i;;,„u; 
..3.10 
..2.3b 
...30c 
....1.'. 
....61 
..3.70 



...2.45 
.3JW3.80 

Kvia.isir gold coin is said to have become 
so worn that it will cost S4.000.000 t,, restore 
:ln' f-_'ii,000,000 in circulation. 



Mining Share Market. 

Operations in mining shares during the week are 
without interest, the market tias been feeble and inac- 
tive with few transactions, and prices of the preced- 
ing week but little changed. As usual, accounts 
from the leading comstock mines continue hopeful. 
In the absence of new ore developments the long 
hoped for "boom" seems as far off as ever, and since 
"hope deferred maketh the heart sick" that organ 
with the expectant crowd must by. this time be exten- 
sively diseased, nor is the outlook atalt encouraging. 
Without any new finds, and the two principal "bo- 
nanza" magnates away in Europe, the prospects for 
a more lively market grows every day "smaller and 
beautifully less." Meantime, the ranks of the "ehip- 
pers-in" are being thinned out. The habitues of 
"Paupers' Alley" grow daily more seedy and dropping 
off one-by-one disappear from view. The occupation 
of the claquer is nearly gone, and the grinding with 
the curb-stone broker is low , where this decadence 
is to end without an early strike on the Comstock or 
a generally^'whooping-up" of the chiefs, it is easv to 
devine — the whole miserable business must inevitably 
go to the dogs. 



Bullion Shipments. 

Alt. Diablo, July 12th, $7,633; Rodie, i6th t *$3,- 
122; Northern Belle, 12th, $5,513.66; Tiptop, 14th, 
$4,876; Central City, 16th, $41,000. 



Production of Gold.— The future supply of 
gold, even for coinage purposes, is beginning to 
be one of more than common interest. Ancient 
history is resplendent with the prodigal display 
of gold by the barbaric peoples of the Orient. 
Arabia, Egypt and Africa, according to this 
same authority, were prolific in their produc- 
tion of this precious metal. Pliny states that 
Cyrus returned from his concp-lest with 34,000 
pounds of gold (about .'510,000,000). Alex- 
ander the Great brought 8100,000,000 in gold 
from Persia. !But at the present time these 
great fields, so renowned in history, are barren, 
so far as the production of gold is concerned, 
and it is evident that Europe can no longer be 
depended upon to perform any appreciable part 
in furnishing a supply of gold to meet the de- 
mands of the future. Even in this country 
the statistics of production show a constant 
and marked decline in gold, although the field 
is largely extended and mining is more thor- 
oughly prosecuted than ever before. 



Paper Steamboats. — Some of our exchanges 
are under the impression that a piper steam- 
boat has recently been launched at Pittsburgh. 
This is a wrong impression. Pittsburgh steam- 
boat builders have not yet got beyond the use 
of wood, iron and steel in their department of 
industry. The paper steamboat is not of the 
present, nor of the past. Further than this, 
we are not willing to accept any responsibility. — 
Am, 

Growth of Oakland.— In 1860 the popula- 
tion of < lakland to San Francisco represented a 
ratio of 1 to 37; in 1S70, 1 to 15; in 1S78, 1 to 
S, and by the school census of 1 SS3, 1 to six. 



The digestive organs weakened and worn out by using 
cathartic medicines, restored hy .using Brown's Iron 
Hitters. 



HQlf\l|J\IG ^UJVljViyXF^Y. 



The following is mostly condensed from journals pub- 
lished in Lhc interior, in proximity to the mines mentioned. 



CALIFOB^NIA. 

Amador. 

M AiuiNKV.— -Ledger, July i 4: A favorable change 
is reported in this mine, Good rock was struck in 
the 900 level on Monday last. It has every appear- 
ance of being permanent, and it is probable that a 
portion of the mill will be started on it in a few days, 
when the quality of the ore will be definitely ascer- 
tained. 

From Deytown. — The Palmer, or Black Hill 
Co. cleaned up $3,000 the other day, that being the 
result of a run of 21 days, 

Jackson. — Operations have once more come to a 
standstill at this mine. The miners quit work Sun 
day morning, and nothing but pumping out water 
has been done since. The cause of this suspension 
is that the company was about six weeks behind in 
the payment of wages. The mine seems to be of a 
pocketty character, but the pockets encountered so 
far have not proved extensive nor rich. Some good 
ore has been met with, but not in quantity to justify 
the erection of a mill, or the hauling of the rock to 
a custom mill. 

Miscellaneous. — Messrs. Matson, Hagerman 
and Fleming have their quartz mill about ready to 
commence operations. The millisbuiltfor lostamps, 
but only 5 have been put in at present. It is located 
at Red Hill, near Butte City, on the Mokelumn 
river side of the ridge. Water is conveyed by 300 ft 
of pipe with a pressure of 150 ft, which will enable 
the machinery to be run with about 15 inches of 
water. The mine is close by. The ore body is 
small — from 12 to 18 inches wide, but it is said to 
pay big. By pounding a small quantity of rock in a 
hand mortar thev took out $100, About 100 tons of 
quartz lies on the dump ready for milling, and it i; 
estimated that the yield from this will more than pay 
all expenses incurred in putting up the mill. They 
will get to work in a few days. J. Stewart has his 5- 
stamp mill near Butte City in running order, and 
started it the other day, but the water supply was 
hardly sufficient. The Kelly mill is again in opera 
tion on rock from Morgan's mine in Murphy's gittcll 
Butte. 

Big Bend Tunnel, — Mcrctny, July 13: The 
Big Bend tunnel is in about 2600 ft; the work is be- 
ing pushed vigorously. 

Btg Bar. — We were lately shown some specimen* 
of gold, ranging from the size of a pin's head to that 
of a large pea, taken from the Big Bar drift mine, 
situated about eleven miles above Big Bend. The 
mine is the property of D. K. Perkins, of this citv, 
and according to all reports it will turn out one of 
the richest in the county. 

At Vankkf, Hill.— Pred Wellington, living near 
Yankee Hill, is the owner of a fine quartz lead, from 
which, he says, ten thousand tons of $15 milling ore 
can be taken out above the water level, at a cost not 
to exceed $2 per ton. The ledge is eight ft wide, 
and the owner thinks the supply of ore is inexhausti- 
ble. Mr. Wellington will show his mine to any par- 
ties who may wish to examine it. There arc many 
other good leads in the vicinity. Wood and water 
are abundant, and good roads run to, or within a 
short distance of many of the mines. One of the 
great drawbacks to this section of the country is that 
there is no mill within reaching distance, by which 
the ore can lie prospected. We have no doubt that 
a mill erected in the vicinity of Yankee Mill, lu <lo 
custom work, would be a paying investment. 

Mines on Butte CREEK-.—fiecord, July 14: 
J. A. Hedges & Co. have struck a blue stratum of 
gravel coming out of the hills which prospects sur- 
prisingly well in coarse gold. John Foley, working 
two men has taken out in six'mon'ths nearly three 
hundred ounces of gold exclusive of expenses. Joe 
Rice just below the Foley claim, is putting money in 
the Bank of Butte County every week. William 
Longley has a very good claim on Boneyard Flat, 
making $1.50 to every bucket of dirt taken nut. 
Alex. Mclntyre, is working his hill claim, and mak- 
ing money, too. W. N. Xesbit, another of our 
forty-niners, has struck rich diggings opposite Whis- 
ky Flat, where he has located a derrick. He thinks 
Helltoun will yet come up to the old palmy days of 
the past, when he used to take in a thousand dollars 

cry Sunday. 

Calaveras. 

Anox'T West Point. — Chronicle, fitly 14: The 
Star of the West mine has been yielding some very 
ich rock lately; The Haskin's mine islooking more 
favorable now than for years past. Mining experts 
and capitalists arc here prospecting some of the <>ld 
mines. Prospects look encouraging for this place. 
Five tons of ore from the (Jno mine in Nassau Val- 
ley owned by Sylvester & Co. were recently worked 
by arrastre process, which yielded $15 75 per ton. 
The shaft from which the ore was taken is about 27 
ft deep, and the vein about two ft wide. 
El Dorado. 

RICH Sulphuret. — Rcpuldicati, July 12: Mr. 
Stevens, who is developing a promising gravel mine 
n the vicinity of Texas hill, has opened up a sul- 
phuret vein of considerable dimensions that is execed- 
ngly rich in gold, assaying away up into the thou- 
sands per ton. In some of the small conglomerate 
pieces as much gold as anything else can be plainly 
seen. 

Bi.air Mine. — The machinery here was started 
up last week, and the pressure was so great and ap- 
plied so suddenly, that the large iron spur wheel was 
made a complete wreck in a twinkling. This injury 
was repaired by replacing it with a new wheel, and 
on Monday the works were started up again, and in 
a few hours a cog was broken in another wheel. A 
bad beginning. 

Varioi s Mines. — Mountain Democrat. July 14: 
The ditch property at Indian Diggings is reported 
sold to Alvinza Hayward. Mr. James D. Hague, 
president of the Mount Pleasant mine, Grizzly Flat, 
was in town Tuesday and went over to inspect the 
Gopher-Bowlder mine near Kelsey. We are confi- 
dent that in such hands this mine would develop 
into one of the best properties in the State. It is an 
immense ledge, and even if the ore were of lower 
grade than it is would pay. The mining business 
is lively about Garden Valley. John G. Jennings, 
Jr., of Cleveland, Ohio, one of' the owners <>{ the 



Melton mine at Grizzly Flat, was in town yesterday, 
for the purpose of making final payment on the pur- 
chase of the mine. 

Inyo. 

The Mineral Exposition. — Mr. Woodhull has 
finished packing the Independence collection of Inyo 
county ores and minerals, and the whole will be 
shipped to San Francisco the coining week. The 
specimens are over 500 in number, and they fill 14 
boxes, and weigh about one ton. The specimens are 
from every tlistrict in the county, and every known 
mine of any value, and comprise samples of gold, 
silver, copper, and lead. They have been selected 
with great care, both for their "beauty and richness, 
and we shall be much mistaken if they do not attract 
much attention when placed on exhibition. 

A Salt Specimen.— SheriffGregg has contributed 
a splendid specimen of salt from his salt marsh, near 
Big Pine, for the Mineral Exhibition. The piece is 
about three ft by two in size and eight inches thick. 
The salt has crystallized around and over a sage 
brush, leaving a portion of the brush partly exposed 
with the branches covered with salt crystals. It is a 
fine specimen and will weigh about 100 pounds. 
Mono, 

Booie Con.— Free Press July 14: During the 
week ending the 6th instant 01.105 tons of ore were 
sent to the mill and 159.585 tons were crushed. The 
average assay value of the pulp was $31.92 per ton; 
that of the tailings was $4.90 per ton. The ship- 
ment of bullion was valued at $3,924.20. There were 
101 car loads of ore hoisted from the mine, 72 cars of 
which were from the workings between the 640 to the 
780-foot levels: the remaining 29 cars were taken from 
the 740 to the 77ofoot levels of the shaft. At the 
jooo-ft level the west crosscut was driven 6 ft: its 
total length being 289 ft. The north drift, same 
level, is 294 ft long, a gain of 14 ft since last report. 
Work on the east crosscut at the 1000-ft level, which 
was suspended on the 7th of April last, was resumed, 
and has been driven 9 ft during the week, its entire 
length heing now 370 ft. 

Virginia Creek Hymuai i.h 1 Co.— Bar No, 1 "l 
this Co. was melted Thursday h\ A. Soderling, the 
assayer, giving a value of $2000. This company is 
operating at the old Mono diggings, and but ,\ few 
days since commenced hydraulicing with a littli 

giant. They have an ample supply of water, ! 1 

rich territory to work. They have been quietly get- 
ling ready for operations fur some time, and clierc i 
every prospect that they will add materially to the 
resources of the county. 

Nevada. 

Mines in Buim.—Tra/ncri/t/, July 14: Mir 
ledge in the Sherman Con. mine continues to ini 
prove in size and general appearance as the drill Js 
extended south. The 600 level of the Nevada I it} 
minesb.ow.sH 1 * > - i l ledge, which is the largest d< posh 
of ore ever found in that mine. All of thequarm be- 
tween the walls, pays well for Working. \^ soon a 
this level is fairly opened up, sinking will be recom- 
menced. 

Mining for Agates.— Capt. Weare, who ha; 
for three months past been prospecting lor agates in 
the vicinity <>l Newtown, recently struck a ledge thai 
yields some very beautiful specimens of various kinds, 
including chalcedony, carnelian, pure crystal, com- 
mon moss agates, etc. He finds the deposits in 
pockets. His claim is at the head of Rush creek, 
three and a half miles west of this city. 

Miners Discharged.— Since the breaking "i tin 
English dam 70 miners have been discharged from 
the Milton Company's mines at French Corral and 
only four remain in employ. As the dam can not 1" 
reconstructed in time to furnish any more water this 
season, the operations of the mine must !«■ suspend 
ed, and the miners must seek elsewhere for employ- 
ment. If repairs are not made to the dam this sen- 
son there will be no water for next summer's work. 
As the company has made no sign as to what will be 
done, there is a feeling of great uncertainty among 
the residents below San Juan, and there are fears ol 
a general business stagnation. 

Placer. 

In Full Blast. — Times, )uly 14: The iron fur- 
nace at Hotaling are now using 80 bushels of coal i" 
the ton of iron. They arc now turning out _■ | 
of iron per day, and one day 30 tons were turned 
out. Last year 185 bushels of coal were used to 
make one ton of iron, and the result was only about 
half as much was produced as at present, 'I heraan 
now 165 men employed about the mine, ami the) gal 
from $2.50 to $3 per day. The company issue crip 
to their employes in any amount from 5 c-nts lu $-, 
and issue it a-, often as it is wanted. 'I his scrip i: 
good anywhere in the town of Hotaling, as it will 
buy breadstuff's at the stores. None of the employe 
are compelled to trade at the company's store--. The 
mine is in better condition than it has ever been, and 
WOOdchoppers and teamsters are in demand there. 
Plumas. 

Started up.— Greenville Bulletin, [ulvrr: On 
Saturday last the new mill on the Premiun mine was 
started up for the first time. The mill machinery 
was made at the Greenville Iron Work,, and k as 
thorough in finish as it is complete in detail. The 
owners of this mine are all working men; dining the 
past five years ihey have patiently an steadily worked 
to develop their properly. They did not attempt to 
build a mill till they had first sntisiieil themselves that 
there was ore enough to warrant such a step, and tt 
s to be hoped that their most sanguine expectations 
may now be more than realized. It is reported thai 
Rev. Colin Anderson has struck a rich ledge of gold 
and silver bearing quartz on Eagle deck,"" in poop 
county, Nevada. 

San Bernardino. 

Mining Notes. —Calico Print, July 14: The 
Oriental are going down on the 300 level. Steam 
hoisting works running smoothly and a rich deposit 
of ore has lately been found; bullion prospects an 
looming up in this mine. Taggart has struck rich 
ore. Four tons of first-class milling at $534 per ton , 
and four tons second-class at $200. That bonanza 
of a mine the King, yet continues to roll out the sil- 
ver thousands, and its black hive of a hill fairly hums 
with the busy workers down in the deep drifts. To 
the Oro Grande mill 40 miles away goes daily 20 tons 
of its rich ore. Pen tons of first-class ore from the 
Blackfoot mine, have been hauled to the station to ' 
be shipped to San Francisco. 'Pen tons more of 
what is considered to be $2oo-ore, remains on the 
dumps. The Garfield mine is coming out brilliantly, 
striking the rich ledges in every direction. The Bis- 
mark is still looking well. They have a 20-ton ship- 



July 21, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 






i.i'-ni ol ui 

at $250. Messrs. Greer & Barrel! of the O. K.. mine, 

loped some very fine ore, and will 

this week ship lo Ihe Pioneer mill five Urns. This 

I in our comroun- 

: ■ 

I he Humbdg mine is laid 
■ ■ 
of ore on the dui Ible --till at work with 

favorable returns. Gobbler, Alhambra an< 
continue to report favorable. The Manim 
■ 

, ore from the Snow Bird 
milled. 

Shasta. 

1 1: The 
Phoenix mini Bell and 

king well. Ilu* 
Bangharl continues i" turn oui the big 
is really becoming \ mmt w> i 
Ihe beit "f it is i nuggets is 

likely to become i prominent busim 
irrg the superintendeni I dm in an 

mi ,\ thoroughly 
■like manner. The Danghart will 

Ba< kbonr Creek. ■ are beginning 

over the hills, along the creeks, and wher- 

.u ol the pie fi mid. As 

oity, more parties 

iiu broad are com it oui mines. 

We Im latch win- h. 

of tin 

i«d, and no doubt *•■ m shortly. 

halt miles north from f< rty miles 

beloM pal attraction. 

Sierra. 

i n| i mi - Mi i I rihtii,-, July 12: I I 

erty* Is reported to have been sold, J. P, Di 
lieimer bonded it scveni] mo .ro.oooand 

■ m_\ was formed 
\ force "f men liave been en- 
gaged hci i undei the man igemi nl 
ofT. Bsfgei .mil Ui" prospectsare Mattering for open- 
ierty. 
Tub Sierra Buttes. — Thi pushing 
ahead work "ti tin.- foundation ol the new mill to be 
built below No, 9 tunnel, on the river. They are do- 
ing .hi immense amount of dead work thisyi ir. I ■■■ ■ ■ 
hundred thousand dollars will probably be expended 
n be n alized from the lower 
the mine, h is reported that the company 
■ ■ h in. Mt recently. 

Another Big Hai [..—The Bald Mountain F.x- 

i. ire working to an the South 

Kork ground at Foresi ' ity. S'inety-four ounces of 

■ ult of l.i-! week's run. The South 

. . red I h o dh idends. 

Trinity- 

July 14: Many of the 
1 1 1 r 1 )n Tri already \ leaned up for 

the season while others are jusl concluding that 
learned at the pres- 
ent, the gold yield will fall © msiderably short of what 
is considered an average, attributable to the exceed- 
ing dryness ol the winter 1882-3, Po* the quantity 
of gravel washed, the yield is considered excellent. 
Miners will generail) gu on and fix up their claims 
for next seas«»u, the prevailing belief being that it will 
be a wet one. 

Quartz.— The farther down they go on the B lack- 
more ledge, the wider and bitter it gets; The first 
i<>< 2 tons of rock produced $2500 while the last 
crushing of a little less than 16 tons ran close on to 
$3000. Water has given out for this season, but tin- 
work of getting out rock and developing ihe mini- 
will continue and everything lie put in first-class 
order for running when water comes again. Quartz 
prospects in Trinity are more promising than in any 
other section of the Pacific Slope. Deadwood dis- 
trict is producing its thousands every week and new 
mines are being discovered with a frequency that is 
1 encouraging, Bultychoop district is coming to 
tin front with several well developed and good pay- 
ing mines proven, and others which give promise of 
good results in the near future. At Last Pork but 
little work has yet been done, yet it shows that the 
ledges in that section are rich enough to pay well 
from ihe vers beginning, just at ihe present but 
little crushing is being done owing to the lack of 
water for running arrastras, but rock is being taken 
out and piled on the dump ready for crushing as soon 
as water comes, New mines are being discovered, 
and new arrastras erected all the time, from which we 
expect to hear good reporfc another season. 

NEVADA. 

Candelaria District. 

\<iki hern Belle.— TVim Fissure, July 14: 
There has been verj little change in the appearanceol 
the mine since the date of the last report. The work 
in the mine has been much interfered with in conse- 
quence of the celebration. About sixty tons of ore 
of fine grade are being extracted and sent to the mill 
daily. Both mills continue to rim steadily and are 
accomplishing good work. The shipments of bullion 
on July account to the 12th hist, amounted to 
$14,526.49. 

Mount Diablo.— The --tope near winze No. t, 

below the third level, shows a foot of $70 ore that 
looks promising. A little $150 ore is being taken 
from the first level near the shaft. The bullion ship- 
ments for the week were: $4,243.36 on the 6th inst., 
and $9,013.79 on the 9th. 

Columhus CON.— The new hoisting works 
have reahed completion, and will soon be out of tfie 
hands of the carpenter and machinist. The roof of 
the building and the smokestack are plainly visible 
from the town of Metallic, and look quite imposing 
as they rise above the intervening hill. The roof of 
the works is one continuous shed. A fine cupola 
surmounts the apex and from it shoots a nice flagstaff. 
The size and height of the building afford ample 
room for the machinery and gallows frame, as well 
as comfortable quarters for a carpenter shop. The 
hoisting engine" is the largest in the camp, being tin- 
one formerly used in the Fairfax works, at Virginia 
City. The hoisting cables are flat, three inches wide, 
and each about 750 ft in length. A large, fine boiler 
is in position. The pumps and heater are conven- 
iently placed. The supply of water is obtained by 
means of a pipe running into the works. The work 



of taking down the machinery, removing il here and 

putting ii ill done under 

' . 

It and himsell icksmith 

ituated at ihe rear ol the 1 1 

been built near at hand, Tlie sinking of 

,ei which tin ■ has been 

and will be pushed downward speedily. 

Making Borax.— The upper or northern end ol 

. in.ii-li, lying ■ . h ol die tow n ol 

1 'olumbu ne ol industry. After 

.in idle p lufacture 

me three 

or four companies haw been formed and begun 

Its, bofl- 
ei - and other machine) 
and And ithward bj means of teams 

i - done much UJ 

: ibe held in ihl 

cm end of Esmeralda 1 almost inexhaustible. 
Lexington District. 
Rj.\ iyinu. Pioche AV ord, July 14: Mining 
in this old district, located in the 
comer of White fine county, are beginning to mc-.d. 
The turn of ih 11 tick that 

work on 
the gold ledge, on which a sliafl nftj it In depth has 
been sunk, and Ihe ore assays from jao to $70, there 

being 1.11 ■ and i 

required in extracting; it. Thei couple o1 

mi ' incinnati there die other day looking at 

I .1 gold mill at 

once. The district i- ■ witll H LtCt 

Safford District 
Zanoi : I . ' . ing the pa I 

week, three men have been at work in this mine, 
running a drifi easterly on tin ore vein at tl 
level, a distance of over and 45 ft west- 

. , ing the total h nfgth ol drift on this level 
over l ft A vein of rich carbonate ore was encoun 
tered the whole distance. It is contemplated to 
start another drift at water level, 25 or 30 ft lower. 

Shi] 'in of .ores in large quantities from this mine 

will be m order in the very near future, Work on 
the Onondaga has progressed favorably during the 
1 ft is down about 50 perpendicu- 

lar li, 'I he -tratum of rich ore on the south side of 

gouge is continuous, and the general appearance 
ol the shaft at bottom is indicative of in* ■ 
magnitude ol ore vein and grade of ore. The shaft 
now produces ore assaying as high as 201 ounces to 

tl e toil in silver. This continuance of Vein of high 
grade ore at depth is a very encouraging feature of 
the camp. The tunnel and crosscut are pn 
rapidly and are still in ore. The river is now ford- 
able and cars on the switch ;it Gerald will be receiv- 
ing ore from the Onondaga to-morrow or next day. 
A Large number of sacks are alread) at the river 
ready to be taken across and emptied into the cars. 
The company expect to ship several cars to Salt 
I .(]:<■ each week. 

White Pine District. 
Various Mines. — News, July 14: 
11 put to work on the Kinsley 
prospects there are very encouraging. 
field showed us this week some line gold prospects 
from his mine on the upper belt, west of town, lie 
is energetically prospecting it. The Sweetwater 
Company at Hamilton have suspended work on their 
mines on Treasure Hill, and ore hauling has been 
stopped. They have about 250 tons of ore at the 
mill. Thev intend to put on a force ;it the Rescue. 
which is looking well. 



fifteen men 
nines. L'he 

k. ( I. Scho- 



ARIZONA. 






Copper.— Globe Chronicle, July 7: Last year 
Arizona produced over 17,000,000 pounds of 1 upper. 
Thus far during the present year the increase has 
been 33 , and new furnaces are going up. It will 
be a safe estimate that Arizona's output will be at 
least 25,000,000 pounds for 1883. The Old Domin- 
ion Copper Co. have bought all the properly and 
plant of the Long Island Co., consisting of the Cup- 
eritc, Gray, Hoosierand Nevada mines, and the 30- 
ton smelter. It is probable that the furnace will be 
moved to die site occupied by the other Old Domin- 
ion furnaces, and that all four stacks will shortly be 
running steadily. We understand that the Old Do- 
minion Co; also proposes to smelt copper ores for 
ine owners in the district, and that probably an ad- 
ditional furnace will be erected for that purpose. 

ITEMS. — The wages of miners have been reduced 
to $3 at Russelville. The Head Center mine of 
Tombstone has shut down. The ore being taken 
out of the Cave creek mines, Maricopa county, shows 
very rich in gold, silver and copper, and the ledges 
are well defined arid growing larger as depth is at- 
tained. 

Strike. — Epitaph, July 13: In sinking in shaft 
No. 7, of the Toughnut mine a few days since at a 
depth of 60 ft an ore body was encountered which 
promises to rival the famous Combination body, 
from which over a million dollars worth of ore was 
extracted. So far this new strike has proven to be 
12 ft across, and averaging 120 ounces, being of simi- 
lar character and grade to that from the Combination. 
The ore bodv'is continually widening, with every in- 
dication of a bonanza; Professor Church considers 
this the best strike since the ' 'ombination ore body 
was discovered. Being adjacent to Vizioa and 
Mountain Maid, :i fresh impetus \\ill doubtless be 
given lo development in those properties, The com- 
pany is erecting a new concentrating mill in Charles- 
ton, with capacity of 100 tons per day, to be used in 
concentrating tailings, and an experienced concen- 
trator will arrive this week to take charge of it. Fifty 
tons per day are forwarded to mill and smelter, sup- 
plied mainly by West Side, although Toughnut and 
Good Iinough are yielding considerable amounts. 
The quantity of ore in sight to-day in the Tombstone 
Co. 's properties is greater than at any time in the 
past 18 months, and the prospects were never brighter. 
For the month of June the mill turned out $61,400/ 
and the smelter $32,000. Mill and furnace both 1 tin- 
ning regularly. 

About Pkescott. — Courier, July 14: The 
Conger mine, Cherry Creek district is looking well] 
The owner is having a mill erected on the Verde 
river, live miles above Fort Verde. Mr. Lachman', 
superintendeni of the Hidden Treasure, Turkew 
Creek district, expects to start his furnace, etc. , in a 
month or two. Messrs. Morgan, Gavin & Roberts 
have in the neighborhood of $50,000 worth of ore 
sucked. They will ship it to San Francisco. All of 
tills wealth has 1 ome out of a small shaft, scarce 23 fi 



deep. M 

work developing mines in I 
The " opper Mountain furnao dn on or 

about Ine tir>t of next month. 
is yielding an ibundam r*he miners of 

reek district an ttulated. They 

faith in theri ir lodes, which 

will now l«- made to give up their wealth, 1 

ter is up and read) to turn out bullion. 

Prospecting asm Exi*i.OKiNG. — A number *>f 
rluachui 
report having mad ike. displaying 

I pedition, men- 

made in the 
left I leniing on Friday la it. 1 
Syntona commands the expedition and 

. . 
l'he expedition will reach the San Pedro river in 
aUtui 10 da) -. li will 
line from the Kiu < irande to the !\i 

COLORADO. 

I ulv l.| The v.:, 

lii in proi Iiu 
p. 1 st tin. tounted to $4,279,81 5.31, The 

product for the first three mouths ol i I 
gated $ ■;,- ;■ 1.1I foi [he fir l '-■ 

Against $7,822,390 for 
or a gain of $120,087. 
(_ onsidei ing the loss oi lime am decn 

! bj Hi I miction by lire of the Harrison 
smelter and the l abor si. imp mill, the results must 
certainly be considered Bui for these 

casualties, the productii m would show at leasts quar- 
ter of a million dollars more. The amount of ore on 
hand at tin- smelters is not included in this estimate. 
In making the l> .■■ 1 all illation lead is fi 
$90 per ton, silver at $1. iu per ounce, and 
$20 per ounce. 

Red Mountain.— Mitidoon, Tub 14: Red 
mountain is to-da) Ihe greatest and most wonderful 

1 amp on the continent. The entire district seems one 

mass of mineral, and strikes continue in rapid suc- 
cession. Last week the Full Moon, Guadaloupe, 

( irand I'ri/e, Carbonate King and Maud S. and 

others were added to the list of producing mines; 
and while they are not .is >et "Yankee Girls" or 
"National Belles," bid fair to add thousands to the 

output before snow Hies. There is no vamp in the 
history of mining that has ever produced as many 
paying mines as has Red Mountain, and the pay in 
many instances dates from the first stroke of the 
prospector's pick. Eastern capital seeking invest- 
ment in mining industries generally look with dis- 
trust upon the assertions of local papers; but those 
who have read the XI it Moon, since its origin know 
that we are exceedingly careful regarding mining 
news, and always disposed to surprise rather than 
disappoint. But Red Mountain needs no exaggera- 
tion, aslhe truth itself, 10 saj the least, wears that 
garb. 

IDAHO. 

Bay Horse, Messenger, Jul) 12: This is a lively 
camp this season. 'Ihe rock work of the new stack, 
is completed, and the company is placing the water 
jacket in position. The old stack is running very 
smoothly, yielding about two tons of excellent bull- 
ion per day. The Smelting Co. have one kiln for 
coal finished and are going right on with more ma- 
chinery and more extended improvements in all 
departments. The Spring Mountain M. & S. Co., 
intend to start their smelter on the 20th and expect 
to keep it running all summer. The mines are look- 
ing splendid over there. The S. M. S. &. M. Co, 
have been busy repairing their tramway damaged by 
snow slides lasi winter. It is now running in good 
order and taking ore from the AUeghania and Big 
Windy to the smelter. They had made a new strike 
a few days ago in the Big Windy that shows an 8-ft 
vein of thousand dollar ore which they are running 
to the smelter. They are building a new tramway 
to there mines on Mineral hill where they intend to 
work a large force of miners this summer. It is their 
intention to push their mines to their utmost and 
try and keep their smelter running all next winter. 
The camp in general is looking better than was ex- 
pected. There has not been a mine in the camp this 
spring that has not improved in richness and size. 



MONTANA. 



About Butte. — Inter Mountain, July 14: The 
Cable mine is being thoroughly re-timbered. The 
main shaft of the Mountain View is 440 ft deep. The 
old Longmaid concentrator has been started up on 
Bell ore. A gold mine at Yam Hill is producing ore 
which assays $2,000 per ton. The projected Drum 
Lummon mill will be the finest structure of its size in 
the world. The machinery will weigh 500 tons. Mr. 
W. A, Clark to day contributed for exhibition at 
Denver a handsome piece of Original ore weighing 
150 pounds. It is a characteristic sample from a 
mine which for the past two years has paid regular 
monthly dividends of $3,000. The Anaconda com- 
pany-will send handsome specimens of copper glance 
to Denver, as will also the other copper mines. Thi 
amount of silver in the copper ore at Butte gives this 
district the advantages over all others. Important 
ore developments have recently been made in the 
Alice mine. The 800 level has been reached jjnd 
drifting west for the main ore shoot has begun from 
the bottom. Sinking from the Magna Charta 500 
ft station has also been resumed. 

About Bo/.kman. — The mineral deposits daily ev- 
idence increasing \alue. Two coal properties jusl 
east of Bozeman have recently changed hands. The 
Chesnut mine is siill owned by local capitalists, but 
a stock company has been formed. The North- 
ern Pacific company has con traded for theen- 
tire output of the mine for five years, and will pay 
the owners five dollars for each ton of coal taken out. 
The product of the mine will be put on sale in all the 
towns of Montana cast and west. The Maxey mine 
has also teen sold to an English capitalist. It is one 
of the finest veins of coal in the wesi. The location 
of veins <£ more precious minerals isof every day oc- 
currence. I n Emerson district development proceeds 
upon the recently discovered lodes and there is every 
prospect of a rich camp. From 16 Mile, 60 miles 
north of Bozeman, comes report of renewed vigor in 
working the lodes long since known and recorded. 
The ore carries silver, copper and a large percentage 
lof galena. The ore is very heavy showing it to be 
full of mineral, 



Vnai's W1.1 1.. The Algonquin mill at l*hili| 
making a trial run on ,1 400 ton lot ol ■ 

from th< miain mine, from wto 

ing to pn 1,000 

. ■ 
■ 1 

NEW MEXICO. 
GBORGRTOVi f*W, July 14: The 

Naiad ■.■ the Mi Nuliy, the 

Hon and in fact all the Georgetown min 

are imw steadily producing Ore and it i> estimated 

that the bullion produ ( o.- 

000. f ■ .illa- 

tion as the leading prod 

Rn ii ■ ■ hip- 
■ 

Bella gl . k, and his rein 

aln first- 

■ 

return , ihe figures 

upon mill runs. Mr, Miller has arranged with I 

load 

lots, and will o itariy. The 

mine look- extreme!; be- 

mputed .u fully 200 toi ' coal in 

the I- 1< mda mountain ■ find, and will help 

lo make cheap fuel in southern v ■■■ Vf< kioo. 

OREGON. 

1 11 1: \i 1 m Mines. - Vakima ft< 

ip b\ the usual ro id is about too mil 
Yakima city, principal!) north, and aboitf 12 miles 
west. Hie first claims met with on ascending the 
mountain, is ihe Tlee-al-um. A little furthi 1 
the Foster, and still higher the lias, a( an 
of about 700 ft. The Tacoma Mining Company's 
are here, Theyown the Hawkins mine on 
the riec-al-um ledge and the Wilson on thi Fostci 

Ige. The ore is free milling, ami be 

gold and a 5 Ly< 50 to $4 surface ore. This 

pain has two men at workthereand will soon increase 

the force. Mr. E. P. Boyles, b-q , ol V 

interests here and has a shaft 60 ft d< 

orable prospect. North from these ledges about 

IWO miles, and on Hawkins gulch, an- ihe Silver 

King quartz ledge, the Madeline and Red Jacket, 

About half way up from ihe Burn to the Tlce-al-um 

thi Ida Elmore, These also prospect well. 

1 here are 1 5 claims located in this district. During 
v ork will be prosecuted on most of tin m 
and it is thought the near future will sec the 1 lee-al- 
um an important camp. 

Si it.' IT I Wl.si 1 KN ORKGON. / .'//.'<■, JuK 13: W. 

T. 1 lemons, who h is been looking after the English 
company's mines at Galice creek, has removed from 
that section and will remain in town a while. He 
informs us that considerable prospecting is being 

done on Silver and Briggs creek, as also In quart/ 
on Galice creek. The English Co. will probably 

operate their mines at Galice creek next seaf 

Walter Simmons is building a big reservoir at that 
place anil making other preparations for extensive 
operations next season. Winter & Sou-- are clean- 
ing up and a big yield may be expected from their 
mine. R. Cook has finished 300 ft of his tunnel 
at Steamboat and is going still further in. He expects 
lo strike the lost bonanza in the near future. I losel- 
les & Co, of Scotch gulch Josephine count), have 
finished cleaning up and no doubt did well. Sargent 
Bros., in vicinity of Steamboat, are doing well. Have 
found some fair size nuggets. |. I Epperson A: Co. oi 
Steamboat are taking out considerable gold from 
their placer diggings. I', l-'elnly. and others, who 
have been prospecting in Josephine count) have 

struck il rich at the head of Johnson creek. Wtil. 
Griffin of Slate creek precinct, Josephine county, 
who is prospecting .1 quartz ledge in the vicinit) ol 
Rogue river, brought some fine specimens of ore to 
town last week. Jack Lay ton is now engaged in clean- 
ing up ai Applegate and will be occupied for 
al weeks lo come. Notwithstanding the fact that 
water has been scarcer than usual, a large are.n ol 
rich ground was piped off. 

UTAH. 

Buying Ores.— Salt Lake Tribune, July t6: A. 
W. Foster while in Lake City, Col., buying ores for 
the Sandy Smelter, Utah, 12 miles south of Salt Lake 

City, offered $1.06 per ounce for silver, and 4 '■ cents 
per pound for lead; less $8 for treatment. Railroad 
freight is $8. 

[TEMS.— The road up the canyon is being repaired 
by a big force. Two hundred men are engaged in 
mining in the district. The Maxfield mine is making 
regular daily shipments of rich ore. The nights are 
cold enough in the canyon to make fires comfortable. 
A large number of prospectors are looking over the 
hills this season. All the saw mills in the canyon arc 
running, the demand for lumber is so great. The 
mining outlook has not been so promising in to years 
as it is at present. Salt Lake men have just locale,! 
four claims and bonded four more in the vicinity of 
Argenta. The Silver mountain is building a road, 
preparatory lo shipment of ore. The strike is a huge 
one. The upper works of the Reed & Benson have 
been leased, and shipments will soon be made from 
that property. The snow in the gulches is much 
deeper than at this time last year, andin some place 
is from live to six ft in depth. The Irma, owned b> 
Salt Lake parties, has a fool of 65 ounce ore resem- 
bling the Flagstaff. This mine should soon he able 
to ship. 

Bingham Canyon.— The Frisco mine, Bingham, 
continues to take outa large quantity of ore daily. The 
company has 3,000 ft of tunnels, shafts, and raises, 
and ore every inch of the wa> in all ol them, Their 
vein will average jo inches all through the mine. 
Their lower tunrtel, to tap the vein nl a depth of zoo 
fi deeper than the present vein workings, is in 240 It, 
and according to the survey they have only 36 ft 
more to run to strike the vein. Allan Donaldson, the 
superintendent oi this mine, is doing good and faith- 
ful work. Reports from other mines in Bingham are 
all favorable. 

The Right Man. — Utah will lie well represented 
in the Denver Mining Exposition, which opens on 
Tuesday next. Prof. Clayton will be thereto spread 
our productions before ihe eager gaze of ihdnsands. 
No more suitable man could have been chosen for 
this service. Talented, learned, and upright, 1 lay- 

redit 



ton will n; ] be discharge of Ins duties reflect 

on ihe Territory. In honoring such a man 
honors herself! 



Utah 



S3 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 21, 1883 



Colliery Accident Relief Funds, 

That colliery accidents cannot be entirely 
prevented is acknowledged by all who are prac- 
tically acquainted with the business of coal min- 
ing; so that to provide for the survivors, when 
these calamities do occur, would appear to be 
not only praiseworthy, but an imperative duty 
of colliers and colliery owners alike, for it is an 
indisputable fact that, although the public come 
forward and subscribe liberally upon the occur- 
rence of these unusually fearful accidents, 
which result in the sacrifice of many lives, by 
far greater misery is caused by the more fre- 
quent fatalities which deprive but one or two 
families of their bread winners. It is to meet 
these cases that the fatal accident relief socie- 
ties have been proposed in various districts, for, 
as it is truly said, these associations will pro- 
vide not only for the few fatal accidents which 
awaken public sympathy, but also for those 
minor cases which at present escape attention. 
The object of the Midland District Miners' 
Katal Accident Relief Society is to provide for 
the widows and children of married members, 
and for the payment of legacies to the relatives 
of unmarried members who may be killed by 
those casualties which are of such frequent oc- 
currence in and about coal or other mines or 
quarries, and a sum to defray the funeral ex- 
penses of members accidentally killed in and 
about the pits. This society, which it is ex- 
plained is essentially a workman's society, will 
relieve all the local clubs of the death-rate and 
consequent liabilities, and will not interfere in 
any way with the present working of them. 
The committee earnestly recommend each and 
every member to look anxiously after the inter- 
ests and welfare of the fund, and, individually 
and collectively, endeavor to further and ad- 
vance and assist each other in carrying out the 
aim and objects of the society and the princi- 
ples laid down in the code of rules, bearing in 
mind that men who are dependent upon their 
own hand-labor for the maintenance of them- 
selves and families, are in duty bound to lay by 
something to provide for their wives and chil- 
dren. 

To entitle a society of this kind to support 
from the general public it must be shown to be 
essentially a benevolent society and altogether 
unconnected with trade questions, such as from 
time to time arise between masters and work- 
men. In this respect the Midland Distri2t 
Miners' Fatal Accident Relief Society affords 
by its rules all the guarantee that need be de- 
sired. Its operations extend and are confined 
to the districts of Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, 
Leicestershire and Warwickshire, and it is pro- 
vided that all moneys received on account of 
contributions, subscriptions, donations or other- 
wise shall be applied towards carrying out the 
objects of the society, which, it is explained, 
are to provide a sum payable on accidental 
death and for the relief or maintenance of the 
widows and children of ordinary members who 
may be accidentally killed in or about coal or 
other mines or quarries. With regard to the 
banerits offered to the miners connected with 
the society, the rules provide that when any 
full member or half member meets with an ac- 
cident causing loss of life, the funeral allowance 
shall be £5; there shall be allowed in addition 
for an unmarried full member, £10; and for an 
unmarried half member, £5; and to the widow 
of a married member, the sum of £2 10s in ad- 
dition to the funeral allowance of £5, and the 
sitm of 5s per week; the allowance to continue 
so long as the recipient conducts herself with 
propriety, to the satisfaction of the society. 
Any widow re-marrying shall lie paid the sum 
of £10, in lieu of the weekly allowance; but 
such re-marriage shall not affect the allowance 
to the children. Notwithstanding the fore- 
going scale of allowances, the board shall have 
power, under special circumstances, and at 
their absolute discretion, on the application of 
the person intex'ested, to commute the above al- 
lowances for such fixed sum as they may think 
reasonable. Each child of any married member, 
whose life may be lost through accident, shall 
receive an allowance from the funds of the so- 
ciety of "2s 6d per week. The payments to 
children to continue until the sons attain the 
age of twelve years and the daughters the age 
of thirteen years. 

It must be obvious that such handsome bene- 
fits could not be offered in return for the com- 
paratively small contribution of the working 
miners; but the stability of the society is in- 
sured by the strength which it derives from its 
honorary members, who are interested in the 
miner's welfare. The rules provide that all 
persons shall be eligible for admission as ordi- 
nary members, who are employed in the district 
in or about coal or other mines or quarries; and 
on payment of the contributions, hereinafter set 
forth, they shall be ordinary members, and en- 
titled to the benefits of the society. All per- 
sons not being owners or lessors of mines and 
quarries, who assist in supporting the society 
with an annual subscription of not less than one 
guinea, or a life donation of not less than ten 
guineas, and nil owners, lessees, occupiers, or 
workers of mines and quarries, who subscribe 
not less than twelve, and one-half per cent mi 
the.amount paid by the ordinary members in 
their employment, and all lessors of mines and 
quarries who shall sub c ibe amiually not less 
•than ten guineas, shall become honorary 
members. Honorary members have the right 
to take ['art in the proceedings at any uieethiL; 
of the local agency \yith whie*h they are con- 
nected; and are eligible to hold any ofliee in the 
society; but they have no claim to any benefit 



or emolument from the funds of the society. 
And there is a great inducement to acquire 
honorary membership from the advantages se- 
cured for one's workpeople, since if a member 
meets with a fatal accident, while working at a 
colliery, or mine, or quarry, where the owner, 
lessee, or occupier is not an honorary member 
of the society, the benefits under the rules are 
reduced to twelve and one-half per cent or one- 
eighth. 

The constitution of the society has much to 
recommend it, and the rules are framed with 
judgment and care, so that it may be antici- 
pated that the society will prove permanently 
useful and successful, and afford all those phil- 
anthropically inclined a ready channel for con- 
tributing to the relief of the bereaved and des- 
titute. — London Mining Journal, 



Return Air in Mines. 

The London Mining Journal says: The Royal 
Commission on Accidents in Mines appears to 
have overlooked one most important item in 
the investigations in which they have been en- 
gaged during the last four years, and which has 
not yet terminated. In the preliminary re- 
ports they have given not a word has appeared 
with respect to the air in its chemical aspect as 
it is found when it has performed its duty in 
neutralizing the effects of gases and ascends to 
the surface. Our attention has been drawn to 
this by the action of the Prussian Fire-Damp 
Commission which is now actively at work, and 
issues notes of what is being done, showing that 
the investigations will be of the most thorough 
and practical character. One branch of inquiry 
in which great interest is taken is the chemical 
examination of the air from the upcast shafts 
of a number of German mines. The nature of 
the ail', of course, would depend a good deal 
upon the gases that are given off, and in some 
mines there would be scarcely any, and in 
others a considerable quantity. As a rule, how- 
ever, the German mines do not give off any- 
thing like the quantity of gas that a great many 
in this country do, for, at not a few of these, 
even in the early morning, it is not an unfre- 
quent thing for the men to waft the gas away 
with their caps and jackets before commencing 
work. It may, therefore, be fairly assumed 
that were the return air in some of our mines 
examined it would be found to contain a much 
larger proportion of fire-damp than any of the 
mines in Germany. Yet we are told that Dr. 
Schoudorf, of the Bochum laboratory, found 
the air coming from the upcast shaft of a mine 
in Westphalia contained 1.05 percent of fire- 
damp, although the ventilation going on was at 
the rate of 30,000 cubic feet of air per minute. 
At another well-known mine in Germany the 
air was impregnated with no less than 1.5 per 
cent of fire-damp, where over 500,000 cubic feet 
of air was sent through the workings every 
minute. Even these returns show how a mine 
might gather such an amount of gas, owing to 
an interruption of the ventilating current, that 
would lead to an explosion in a very short time. 
This will be evident when we repeat that a 
mixture becomes in the highest degree explo- 
sive, when the fire-damp is one-ninth or one- 
eighth of the total volume. Therefore, by 
chemically examining the return air, the state 
of the mine, so far as gas is concerned, is easily 
ascertained. If there is a high percentage of 
gas, it shows that the ventilation is not suffi- 
cient, and that the mine is by no means a safe 
or healthy one, and that an immediate remedy 
should be applied in the shape of an increased 
quantity of fresh air being sent from the surface, 
or by splitting the current. A record of the 
state of the air as it comes from the workings 
up the up-cast shaft of the principal mines in 
the districts in England and Wales that are 
termed "fiery," is highly desirable for many pur- 
poses, and could not fail to result in improved 
systems of ventilation, and in increased com- 
fort and safety to the workmen. The Royal 
Commission has not yet sent in its final report, 
and, before doing so, it is to be hoped that it 
will follow the example of the Prussian Fire- 
damp Commission by investigating the chemical 
properties of the air from the up-cast shaft of 
certain mines in districts where they are known 
to give off considerable quantities of carburetted 
hydrogen gas. We have no doubt the Home 
Secretary would look upon such an addition as 
a most valuable portion of the report, as we 
feel sure all our mining engineers would do also. 

New Montana District. — A promising min- 
ing district is being opened in Montana, about 
25 miles west of Bozeman, and across the Jef " 
ferson river. The discovery cannot properly be 
caUed a recent one, as a claim was staked off 
there 13 years ago. But this spring several min- 
ers went to prospecting the district, and the re- 
sult is some 30 locations have been matte. Speci- 
mens are on exhibition, and the indications 
favor a good mining camp. The ore carries 
gold, silver and copper, the latter predominat- 
ing. Assays of the latter metal have given\ 
from IS to 70 per cent, and as high as 240 
ounces of silver have been received. The veins 
are about eight feet wide, and have one well- 
defined wall, the other being somewhat broken 
and irregular. As there is not a 20-foot shaft 
in the district, but little can he said, but there 
is every assurance that some big mines are go- 
ing to be opened up. 

i'i;rsi'KKoi's Miners.— Itis estimated that 
the miners and mechanics of Butte, Montana, 
have on deposit at the three banks of that city 
about $90(1,000. 



The Gold Fields of Venezuela. 

The encouraging mining operations now being 
carried on with British capital in Venezuela, and 
especially in the province of* Ouayana, have 
several times been referred to in the Mining 
Journal, and it must be particularly gratifying 
to those whose funds are embarked, to find that 
local opinion is quite in accord with that ex- 
pressed in this country. It appears that Vene- 
zuela is each year acquiring a more prominent 
position, and that the growing prosperity will 
be equally shared by Venezuelan and British 
capitalists. The returns published in the Trin- 
idad Royal Gazettf, showing the values, duties 
pjaid, etc., of the imports and exports during 
the past year, are highly instructive to those 
who have at heart the interest of this thriving 
colony. It will be noticed, says the New Era, 
of Trinidad, how largely Venezuela figures in 
these statistics, both in the imports of her gold 
and the various manufactured goods and other 
supplies forwarded there by our merchants. 
Little public notice has heretofore been taken 
of Guayana and its auriferous region, the prod- 
uct of the latter being now the foundation of 
all the business in the neighborhood of the Ori- 
noco, and, in fact, of the State. It is an undis- 
puted fact that these mines are the richest in 
the world. Who has ever heard of a district 
with the limited population which Caratal has 
at present, producing upwards of £600,000 
worth of gold per annum '! This amount is 
gradually increasing, and no doubt the ideas of 
our great explorer (Raleigh) have been realized 
— that the gold fields of Uuayana is the verita 
ble El Dorado. This island is the key to the 
Orinoco; it is the base of supplies. 

What a great interest we should take, there- 
fore, in watching and assisting in developing 
that wonderful land. Some will say we know 
what these mines are; we went into some fool- 
ish speculation and lost our money; but the oc- 
currence of one mine turning out unprofitable 
is not sufficient evidence to condemn generally 
a country which has such a great future before 
it. Referring to the older-discovered mining 
districts, where are situated the fabulous El 
Callao Mine, the Chile or Tigre, have not these 
proved that there is quartz more highly aurif- 
erous than any known gold diggings in the 
world. Then in the later opened region, south- 
east of Callao, there is the Mexico, San I'as- 
quale, La Cruz, and the Victoria; all of these 
are producing, it is said, gold quartz which bids 
fair to equal, if not eclipse, the older mines, 
and gold mining is as legitimate as any other 
enterprise when managed in a business-like 
way. Gold mining has been the foundation of 
the success of all our eastern colonies, notably 
in Australia and New Zealand. Why, there- 
fore, when we have a country so near us which, 
though comparatively undeveloped, is rich, we 
say, should not more public interest be taken 
in proving that Guayana is a place well worthy 
of attention as a field for mining enterprise? 
By so doing, says the New Era, in conclusion, 
we think the golden sands of Yuruari will be 
gradually washed more and more this way, and 
ultimately make the Port of Spain the Mel- 
bourne or San Francisco of the Antilles.— 
London Mining Journal. 



Mountains of Mica. 

A New Mexican exchange says: Much lias 
been said and written about the mica found in 
the mountains west of Las Vegas, and many 
may imagine, because there lias not been al- 
ready a large, profitable output, that the expec- 
tations at first announced have been met. Such 
is not the case. On the other hand, mineral of 
excellent quality, and in paying quantities, has 
been found in place in more than one locality. 
Unfortunately for us, however, the parties who 
have undertaken the mining of mica in San 
Miguel county upon a large scale, with ample 
means to prosecute development work, do not 
possess the best property, or rather that upon 
which the best showing can be made in the 
shortest time. Others who have really very 
promising claims, however, have not the means 
to work them, but are holding them at higher 
figures than can be obtained every day 
in the year. Few people understand the 
value, method of working, and character- 
istics of mica mining, but those few experts who 
have examined the prospects in this county have 
rerjrted favorably upon them, and it is only to 
b j regretted that more active operations have not 
already been begun, Upon the other slope of the 
range prospects lying in the same belt and for- 
mation have been sold to Ohio capitalists, who 
formed a company called the Alansfield Mica 
Co., and several large contracts with East- 
ern stove manufactories have already been en- 
tered into. The mine is located in the northeastern 
portion of Santa Fe county. The product will 
be shipped via Espanola to Mansfield, and 
there resorted and boxed for shipment to the 
factories. 

i N. E. Peterson and others, of the hot springs, 
have, within the past few days, made locations 
of; mica mines near the source of the Gallinas, 
and it is their intention to work them promptly. 
There is certainly a large industry open for cap- 
italists in this subject. 



Quartz Mining in Amador. 

A correspondent of the Amador Dispatch 
says: As quartz mining is one of the principal 
interests in Amador county, and in which I 
have been engaged for the past thirty years, I 
send you a few notes for publication in your 
valuable paper on that subject: The first loca- 
tion for quartz mining in Amador, was made at 
Amador City, in March, 1S51, by Glover, Fitz- 
waters, Rogers and Dover, who located the old 
Amador and Spring Hill claims, and many 
other claims were located on the extension?. 
The Alpine, at Plymouth, by John Souther- 
land, the Empire, and other claims were located 
in 1851. The quartz veins in the northern part 
of the county, have been prospected and worked 
for the last thirty years, and large sums of 
money expended in prospecting to secure pay- 
ing claims, but the most of the locations have 
been abandoned as worthless. The. value of 
many claims have been misrepresented, which 
is working a great injury to claims that are 
really valuable. Many locations are only made 
for speculating purposes, and are "wild-cat" 
claims, represented as valuable to victimize in- 
nocent purchasers. What is known as the 
"mother lode or lead," extending from the Mo- 
kelumne river to the Cosumnes river, iucluding 
the locations at Jackson, Sutter creek and 
Amador, Drytown district and Plymouth 
are all on the west lead blue ribbon 
rock, and there is no other in this State. 
No other quartz belt that has as yet 
been found, has rock like this blue rib- 
bon rock, or has ever been made to pay 
by mill process. East of the Empire or blue 
lead, in the Plymouth mining district from Dry 
creek to the Cosumnes river, there has been ten 
quartz mills built on east leads of the blue lead, 
and every one lias proved a failure and been 
abandoned as worthless. East and west of the 
mother lode, as far as I know, the quartz leads 
have a pocket formation, and have never paid 
for working by mill process, and, in iny opinion, 
cannot be made to pay, but must eventually be 
abandoned as worthless. For more than thirty 
years I have been interested in quartz mines, 
and my personal interest would deter me from 
doing anything to retard or injure the develop- 
ment of the mining interest ; but I think the 
location and efforts to sell worthless mining 
claims to capitalists is a detriment to the min- 
ing interest and prevents capitalists from pur- 
chasing claims that are valuable. The most 
successful mining capitalist in this county is 
Ah'inza Hayward, commencing at Sutter creek, 
on the mother lode, and he still sticks to the 
mother lode or blue ribbon rock lead in his 
Plymouth mines, and has followed it up to the 
Church Union in EI Dorado county. 

It is not the wish of the writer to discourage 
prospecting for quartz mines, but on the con- 
trary I have always given all the information 
and encouragement in prospecting that I could. 
But capitalists have been fooled so often in this 
county that they are now afraid to invest in 
mines that are known to be valuable and pay- 
ing claims. 



iPiiE value of the raw materials of hardware 
is as nothing compared with that of the finished 
fajbrics. A chain was manufactured which 
Weighed only two ounces and cost $170, being 
y(53,GOO times the value of the original iron 
from which it was made. 



A Slickens Ranch.- The Nevada City 
Transcript has this to say about a slickens ranch 
near that city: About eight acres of the ranch 
is where there was but a few years ago a ravine 
that served as an outlet to various mines. Mr, 
Uetchell built a brush dam across it, raising the 
structure as the tailings from the mines piled 
up above it, until now the surface is forty feet 
above the original bed of the stream. From 
this made ground the owner annually cuts an 
average per acre of from six to seven tons of 
timothy and clover. Noother land in this part of 
the State produces such wonderful crops as 
does that slickens deposit. It needs compara- 
tively little fertilizing, and does not "wear out' 1 
like ordinary soil. 



Liquefied Carbonic Acib. — The use of liq- 
uefied carbonic acid in the preparation of car- 
bonated beverages is recommended by Mr. 
Apothekcr Volk, of Itatzeburg, who states that 
experiments have proved it to be the purest, 
most suitable, and best method of impregnating 
mineral waters. It is also claimed that by 
using the carbonic acid in this form the more 
expensive part of the apparatus now used in 
the manufacture could be dispensed with. The 
great disadvantage however, lies in the fact 
that liquefied carbonic acid requires a pressure 
of thirty-six atmospheres to hold it in that con- 
dition at zero of centigrade, which pressure 
rapjidly increases as the temperature rises. 

The Usk ov Oilstones. — The proportions of 
glycerine and alcohol to be used on oilstones 
vary according to the instruments operated 
upon. An article with a large surface — a razor 
for instance — sharpens best with a limpid 
liquid, as three parts of glycerine to one of al- 
cohol. For a graving or any similar tool, the 
cutting surface of which is very small, as is also 
the pressure exercised on the stone if sharpen- 
ing, it is necessary to employ glycerine almost 
pure, with but two or three drops of alcohol. 

Gas Flame Light. — The amount of light 
given out by a gas flame depends upon the tem- 
perature to which the particles of solid carbon 
in the flame are raised, and Dr Tyndall has 
shown that of the radiant energy set up in such 
a flame, only the.l-*25th part is luminous; the 
hot products of combustion carry off at least 
four times as much energy as is radiated, so 
that not more than one hundredth part of the 
heat evolved in combustion is converted into 
light. 



July 21, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



Gold Quartz Mining. 

Mr. Thomas Cornish, M. EL, the well known 
writer on in i 

: Lhurst \ ictoru)»the noted quarts min- 
lvc been man} 
in gold mining, DOt 
only to many joint-stock componii 
private mine owners, who have been exception' 
ally fortunate in striking rich reefs in their 
milhonaires, and ire still 
in receipt « »f enormous in< 
The rystem inaugurated for developing the 
he district ■•■. . i iy days 

such m tended to retard rapid development, and 
of time, capita] and labor, 
The claimi were t->.. small, and consequently 
caused I oi mors shi 

li ) foi efficient working. In mai 
1 have seen ten or twelve shafts sinking on oi 
for a lode where there onlj 

1 main shaft, a suitable bim I 

dowu !■■ a great depth. Many oompani 

ihaft t" s depth 
of :(ik» to WO fe it, dawdlii work by 

only employing ■ few men, where with energy 
tod a Less cost the same work might hs 
done in .i \ i 
When 

ii. it should be put lied on with all expo- 
ilitinu possible, as the qui i suits are 

proved, the better and cheaper will it be for 
. ho have to pay for it. Thus in shaft 
sinking as many men should be kept below as 
i .in conveniently work. There is no mo 
face labor required for four, five or six miners 

■ in a shaft than tin it- is for tWO, While 

more than double or treble the wort 
'luring the Bams time. 

In quartz mining, it Le generally ae< e arj 
thai the main Bhaft should be fcopt continually 
sinking, while levels should be opened forde- 
lent at intervals of from sixty to one 
hundred fe it, oa experience may guide the man 
ager. The neglect of keeping pro 
work well ahead is oftentimes attended with 
much loss, not only in time wasted, but in de- 
preciation of the value of the mine. 

One «»f the greatest wonders in connection 
with gold mining industry, when any new dis- 
coveries have been made, and a dish Bets in lor 
nent, is the surprising rapidity with 
which mushroom authorities spring into exist- 
ence. Men who by a fiuke have made a lucky 
i [on in shares, or obtained a concession 
or claim in or near a locality where gold might 
have been seen or expected, to be found, arro- 
gate to themselves the position of oracles or 
authorities on the Bubject of gold mining, and 
impudently assume a knowledge of an industry 
that con only be acquired by long practical ex- 
perience and intelligent application. 

Men who m- ;er saw a gold mine, and know 
nothing of the proper method of working one, 
will write reports and undertake the control of 
works of which they arc completely ignorant. 
Tin- natural result follows that large sums of 
money become squandered in the purchase of 
mines at fabulous prices, and afterwards wasted 
in di Bgracefu 1 management. At the expense 
of the shareholders and their unfortunate dupes, 
these mushroom authorities enjoy a butterfly 
existence during a brief period of sunshine 
l while the money holds out), when they sudden- 
ly collapse, and fall into the obscurity from 
whence it is a pity they ever emerged. The 
mischief created by these new chum authorities 
on gold mining, is, however, incalculable, as it is 
not mere'y the money they waste in gaining ex- 
perience and making a muddle of everything at 
Other people's expense, but their utter incapaci- 
ty brings discredit upon the industry of gold 
mining generally, and retards the development 
of legitimate mines by experienced persons. 

The reports which have appeared from some 
of the so-called managers of mines in India and 
west Africa from time to time since the rush 
set in for mining in those places have been 
enough to condemn the writers as utterly in- 
competent for the positions they have under- 
taken, and the shareholders are beginning to 
rind out to their cost the mistake they have 
made in their selection of directors and man- 
agers, whose chief qualifications have been 
bumptiousness and entire ignorance of the prac 
tieal details of gold mining. 



Useful Information. 



Musty Smells in Untenanted Houses. 

It is.t cause of much wonder anion 
who do not study the subject, why a compara- 
tively new house, after b 
tun. and then lefl vacant a few weeks, should 

Sted with bad smells and told at- 

not to 1.,- endurable for habi 
tation until the house has been thorough!) ven- 
tilated. 
A bttle study will irrive at 

m for nidi i a The parties 

last inhabiting tin- house may have lefl il in 
perfect on . cleanli- 

tar as outward appearance v, 
corned, nothin ted to lead any- 

i hal i he musty smell genei ated 
would Boon be in running order. 

w e can best illustrate the mottum <•/« ranrfl of 
: he following di Bcripl ion, as 
furnished us by the owner of the pri 
•• The house had only been built a little more 
th in b y< or, u the expiration of that time it 
tndergo s thorough change. A Bervant 
was left to Bweep out and clean up generaUy. 

After a thorough (?) sweeping, the windows 

were washed and the almost muddy water 
dumped into the kitchen sink, instead of being 
thi ■..I. min the yard hopper. The shelves in 
the pantry were washed, and the water ahio 
empied in the sink. Instead ot letting a boun- 
tiful supply of water run, that the trap might he 
thoroughly cleansed of filth, the girl simply 
used the cloth in brushing the water down the 
sink and forcing the thicker portions through 
the b1 rainer. 

Tin- same thin- was done upstairs; windows 
ami shelves washed, and the dirty water 
dumped into the wa&h basin, a cloth used to 
wipe the basin clean, and all was right. We 
prefer not to put in print what took place in 
the bath-room. To all appearance the house 
looked clean. The servant went through the 
house, shut and locked every window, and left 
the death-dealing musty smell generators at 
work. My advice to leave the windows open 
was not regarded, and as the time would not 
be up for several days for me to take possession 
of the premises to make the necessary altera- 
tions, 1 had no authority to leave the windows 
open. 

Of course the gas fiend was soon at work. 
The filth left in the traps, the dirt on the 
shelves, wet ami but half washed, etc., soon 
began to putrefy ; the absence completely of 
fresh air from the windows being closed, helped 
on the decaying mass, and a lively ferment took 
place. With such generators of musty and foul 
vapors, is it any wonder that in a short time 
the house was filled with a noxious atmosphere?" 
We are sure, when we visited that house some 
days afterwards, even after sending a boy the 
day beforehand to open the windows all through 
the house, that we were met with, on opening 
the door, a smell that put us in mind of a cer- 
tain story where a river had to be turned from 
its course in order to purify certain stables. 

Landlords would be well paid after a tenant 
has left a house to immediately give it a thor- 
ough sweeping; allow the water to run several 
minutes in all the sinks, basins, and water- 
closets; if there be a cellar, see that not a par- 
ticle of vegetable matter is left around; leave a 
window in every room open ; scatter a little 
chloride of lime in the cellar, and place some 
in a saucer in the bath-room and kitchen. It 
will take you but a few hours to follow these 
suggestions, and only a few dimes 1 worth of 
materials to carry them out. Your house, 
even if idle for quite a time, will be sweet 
and wholesome, and the little labor you have 
spent will be well rewarded by the praises of 
your new tenants upon the nice clean house 
they have secured. 



Bi rminc (i i.m-I'ii.js. An inter- 
esting application oi a patent analogous t<> those 

for Utilizing the waste product- 

oently taken out by Mr. II. I.. Armour, and the 

property ol the Jameson I iokel panj I limited I, 

has just been made in the i heap at 

Seaton Burn Colliery, in Northumberland. A 

pit heap 

and dust, lor which, as a rule, no marl 

be found, ;u> well as loi shale and iron pyrites 
m»-t with in working thecoaL 'I hese lieapa are 
generally burning, and in very many instances, 

give oil ike and dirt as t)0 bl 

terrible nuisance t" tin- m ■ i. This 

.i Seaton Burn; but ^;. 
the heap with sand, and sinking a 
I iron pipes connected with a main, in 
which .i ' ustant suction is maintaim 

u removed, and a 
yielding both oil and ammonia, ia obtained, In 
this manner a worse than valueless property 
converted into a profitable one, and, 
a- the system is now in coi i a "i extension to 
ipa at Keli ii I ilasgow, it is 

ipod that before long an end will be put 
to one of the greatest nuisances in colliery dis- 
tricts. 

BkNDINU I'].«i\\ J Ian DLES. No special ma- 
chinery is required for bending plow handles, 
further than a WOOden form to bend over, and 
an eye to hold tin- end, with a hook to catch 
the long end and hold it, all of which may be 
home made. Tin timber does not require to 
be seasoned. The handles, if gieen, require 
steaming long enough to heat them through, 
possibly one hour. If they are dry, they should 
be snaked in warm Water at least one day before 
steaming; then two or three hours' steaming 
should be enough. Much depends upon what 
kind of timber the handles are made of. Those 
who make a business of bending and making 
plow handics make them double to prevent 
splitting the ends by bending close to the end, 
and afterward cut them. Often a piece of band 
iron is placed on the convex side of the wood, 
and bent with it to prevent splintering. — Wood 
Worker. 

FlXlNO Locks. — When it is not convenient to 
take locks apart in the event of keys being 
lost, stolen or missing, and it is desired to lit a 
new key, take a lighted match or candle and 
smoke the new key in the flame, introduce it 
carefully into the keyh'dc, press it firmly 
against the opposing wards of the lock, with- 
draw it, and the indentations in the smoked 
part of the key will show exactly where to file. 



Tin Rubber Plant in Mexico. — Mexico is 
making a study of the culture of the rubber 
plant. The hardiness of the plant is said to be 
such that its culture is exceedingly simple and 
inexpensive, where the climate and soil are suit- 
able. In much of the Mexican coast region the 
only expense is the weeding required, when 
the plants arc young, to give them a chance to 
grow and strengthen. 



1*koi;kkssi\ r Indians. — The Piutes at the 
Pyramid Lake reservation, Nev., are showing 
considerable progress. They have dug five 
miles of ditch for irrigating purposes this year, 
and will raise 1,000 bushels of wheat this sum- 
mer. A number of children arc attending the 
boarding-school, begun last fall by direc- 
tion of the Covernment, and many of them can 
read, write and do some work in primary arith- 
metic. They arc also taught to cook, sew, etc., 
and have made considerable progress in this di- 
rection. Mrs. McMasters has charge of the 
school, and Mrs. Mapes is matron. Religious 
service is conducted on Sunday by Mr. Aibby, 
the Baptist minister of Wadsworth. The ser- 
vices are well attended, and the Indians are 
generally respectful and attentive. 



A Metal Exchange has been established in 
New York. Forty-four applications for seats 
were received in one day. The initiation fee is 
$350. Regular daily calls are made, and con- 
tracts for pig iron will, it is believed, be fixed 
at the minimum of one hundred tons, with mar- 
gins at $'2 per ton. Storage arrangements, 
which will reduce the cost of carrying pig iron, 
are being made. 



Re-i\untim: an Olo Wagon. — Some one 
recently asked the Blacksmith anil Wheel- 
wright if it w r as possible to make a good job of 
painting an old cracked or scaled wagon with- 
out scraping or burning all the old paint off. 
That journal replies as follows: "When a body 
is slightly cracked, it may be pasted over with 
putty made of dry white lead, japan and rub 
bing varnish, put on with a wide putty knife, 
After it gets perfectly dry, grind down with 
hard pumice stone and water. For burning off 
a body 1 use the alcohol burner. It costs 
about §4.00, but is the best burner I ever saw. 
For cleaning off the grease, I use an old half- 
round file ground up to an edge. Scrape all off 
clean, sand paper, and paint up as a new job. 
In painting over old paint that has commenced 
to scale off', it will continue to do so and throw 
off the new." 



No Advantage, — The usual ways of adding 
to the transmitting power of belts are by apply- 
ing to them oil, rosin, or some adhesive sub- 
stance, and by tightening them on the pulleys. 
The use of oil, rosin, etc., results in a direct 
waste of power, for*, as it gets old, it becomes 
gummy, and the belt sticks to the pulley, re- 
quiring a more considerable power than is gen- 
erally supposed to separate it, anil effectually 
neutralizes all the advantage sought to be 
gained by its use. 

An oil for belting is recommended which con- 
sists of nine parts of linseed oil and four parts of 
litharge, ground in water. These, boiled to a 
plastic consistency, thenj liquefied by an addi- 
tion of turpentine, Furnish an oil which, it is 
claimed, promises many admirable qualities. 



Good Health, 

Dyspepsia— Variety in Human Stomachs. 

Dyspepsia, which is so much complained of 
and seems to be so w idespread , arises from 
various causes, and is cured in various ways. 
Many people imagine that the internal organs 
in all individuals are the same, and that like 
treatment will produce like results in every- 
body. The internal organs are alike in different 
people just as their faces, hands, feet, figures, 
are alike. A celebrated surgeon who has at- 
tended a thousand autopsies, says that the 
aspects of the inside of bodies vary as notice- 
ably as the aspects of the outside of the same 
bodies, and we know that the variations in 
these are infinite. It is very rare that we find 
the hands of any two persons agree exactly in 
form, proportion, color, symmetry, even though 
the same number of glove may be worn by both. 
The same thing is true of the other external 
members of the body, and equally so of the 
internal organs — the heart, the lungs, the liver, 
the stomach, and all the rest. Just as a man must 
have his clothes made to order if they are to 
be a perfect fit, just as he must have his own 
last for his shoes, and his own measure for his 
gloves, so he must fit his stomach with food 
"convenient" for it. 

"I've tried to eat oatmeal and vegetables and 
graham bread, and do without meat and fine 
flour," said an author to an expounder of hygi- 
enic living on the vegetarian plan, "btit I can't 
write on such food. I must have a generous 
diet or my brain won't work." The professor 
was a man of sense, and looking over the com- 
plainant carefully, replied: "Your stomach is 
small and you need concentrated foods; meat 
eggs, and fine flour with fruits are your proper 
diet." A person with a large stomach and 
vigorous circulatory system can absorb large 
quantities of plain cold food and find nutriment 
and comfort in it. To such a person, condi- 
ments are superlluities, but with a person of 
limited capacity of eating and feeble circulation, 
warm food and vegetal des are not only grateful 
but necessary. Even sheep like spicy bushes, 
and when they are permitted to run wild in the 
woods, regale themselves on aromatic herbs and 
shrubs, and by this food their flesh acquires a 
gamy flavor. 

The kind of work a person does largely de- 
termines the quality and quantity of food he 
requires. Corn bread, cabbage, pork, onions, 



■ i, supply th. necessary elements 
wanted by tiie average workinginan in t,;. 

ail'; but the ill 111 liflS Ofl well as 

his hands, and works indoors, w ill nut til 
this diet, and In hlS brain- and not 

ill not find it at all suited to his 
What lie will find suited to hit 
■ . eterimne onlj mi nt, and this 

is true, more or less, ■ adividual. To 

an active poison; to another, 
■ 

■ ' ■ are good (or the 
majority ol eat i . Somi i - a mal ■ itisfac- 
■ I oi om di b others require a variet) 
ol dishes to keep their stomachs complai 
Bant. T ireum 

stances will relish and digest foods that under 
■ i eni .on! Bick< aiug to him. 

has been surfeited with rich and varied 
bills ol tar.-, will settle down to the mush and 

brown bread ol some "Cure," and thrive on the 

diet, lb- has been overfed, and now it bene* 
iit.s him to be underfed. Another, who has had 
his fill ,it Lean Eare at home, will Loath the mush 
ami brown bread, and suiter indigestion from 
eating it. * hie who lias enjoyed b choice ol 
dainties maj | i "hog and homing 

tolerabli when "roughing it," but a steady ad- 
herence to this dish will causi dj pe] ia in the 
toughest stomach. — JV, Y. Tribune. 

The moral ol the above is, thai as stomach 
are as unlike each other as faces or dispositions; 
so each must acquire that wisdom which will 
enable him to be perfect master of himself and 
govern his taste and appetite according t>> his 
own peculiarities of constitution and needs, 

Baldness. 

In an article recently contributed to the 
Gesundfirit—u paper, as its name imports, de- 
voted to sanitary subjects I'rofessnr lleclam, 
a ( terraan <■■ U fvrter, makes some timely and use 
ful observations on the subject of baldness. Af- 
ter describing, in a vein of pleasantry, tin \ 
array of bare polls which may be seen any even 
ing in the pit of a theater, or the body ol a lec- 
ture room, he discusses the causes of baldness. 
He does not think, as is sometimes said, that 
loss of hair is the result either of impaired 
health or of much study. The strongest men 
are often bareheaded, and German profi 
who tare nothing if not studious, are dis- 
tinguished above all men by the profusion of 
their locks. (In the other hand, soldiers and 
postilions, who wear heavy helmets and leather 
caps, and wear them a good deal, are frequently 
as bald as billiard balls. From these facts Heir 
Keclani draws the conclusion that baldness 
comes chiefly of the artificial determination of 
blood to the head, and to the heat and perspi- 
ration thence arising. The result is a relaxed 
condition of the scalp and loss of hair. If the 
skin of the head be kept in a healthy state, 
contends the Professor, the hair will not fall oil. 
To keep it healthy the head covering should be 
light and porous, the head kept clean by wash- 
ings with water, and the hair cut short. The 
nostrums vended as hair restorers, and on which 
a fabulous amount of money is wasted by the 
ignorant for the benefit of quacks, he denounced 
as worse than useless. In ninety nine cases out 
of a hundred they are worse than useless, 
Cleanliness and cold water are the sole trust- 
worthy specifics; but when once the hair roots 
are destroyed, uotjall^ the oil of Macassar, the 
bear's grease of Siberia, nor the cantharides of 
Spain will woo back the vanished locks. 

Poisonous I' 1 lowers. — Every summer, when 
the beautiful oleander is in bloom, some cases 
of persons being poisoned by this flower have 
been recorded. Last year a young lover at 
Orovillc was nearly fatally poisoned, by chew- 
ing the leaves of an oleander boquet, given him 
by his sweetheart, and a young gentleman and 
lady, at Marysville, came near climbing the 
"golden stairs," by chewing the twig of an ole- 
ander bush. This flower is usually of a rich, 
pale red, but is sometimes white, and is a 
lovely, sweet scented bloom; but the wood and 
all parts have a poisonous action, resembling 
that of digitalis,' and is best treated by a judi- 
cious use of stimulants. The first instance of 
poisoning this year, has just reached a Record 
reporter, who was informed by a person con- 
versant with the facts. One evening last week, 
a young lady named Sadie Meeker, residing 
with her pai'ents, near Vina, carelessly chewed 
an oleander bud. In a short time afterward sin- 
was taken deathly sick, and probably would 
have died had not medical assistance been im- 
mediately brought from Tehama. Her mouth 
and face were distorted out of recognition, and 
the pains suffered by the girl were most intense. 
Happy to relate, though, she is now recovering, 
but her once pretty mouth now looks like a piece 
of raw liver. — Chico Record. 



The Isthmus of Corinth Canal. — IJy the 
canal through the isthmus of Corinth, which 
will probably be finished in less than five years, 
vessels from the Adriatic ports will save IS; - ) 
miles, and those from the Mediterranean 95 
miles. There is also an advantage in avoiding 
the dangerous coasts in the vicinity of Mata- 
pan. The canal will be four miles long} seventy- 
two feet wide, and twenty -six feet deep at Low 
water. 

"Helium." — Professor Palmer i announce 
the discovery in the lava of Vesuvius, fehe sub 
stance giving the spectrum line of ' lielimn,-' 
an element hitherto recognized in ti 

Efforts will probably be made to isolate it, 



40 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 21, 1883 






5GIENTIFIC 



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SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday Morning, July 21, 1S83. 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS.— The Dyer Cannon Ball Quartz Mill; 
Working Minors and Bullion Production; Product of 
Quicksilver During the Past Year, 33. What the Re- 
port of the Director of the Mint Shows; Improving on 
Further Acquaintance, 40. Iron and Civilization, 41. 

ILLOSTRATIONS.-Dyer Cannon Ball Quartz Mill, 

33. Apparatus for the Analysis of Furnaue Cases 41. 
CORRESPONDENCE.— iiuss Camp; More Abouj 

Nickel, 34- 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS. —Destruction of 
Steam Boilers; Finishing Files by Sand Blast; Rolling 
Cold Iron; How to Anneal Small Castings; Growing 
Competition of the Gas Bnghie; Cutting Steel with Soft 
Iron; Is it Possible to Cast a Chain: Cast Hardening; 
Progress of American Carriage Industry; Effects of Com- 
pression on the Hardness of Steel; Lubricant for Heavy 
Bearings; American Plumbing, 35. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. - Photographing the 
Solar Corona; A Remarkable Saurian; French Academy 
Prizes; A New Food; To Determine the Quantity of 
Moisture in Walls; Photographing the Vocal Organs; 
Electricity; Power of the Waves; Rainbow Class, 35. 

MINING' STOCK MARKET.-Sales at the San 
Francisco Stock Board, Notices of Meetings, Assess- 
ments, Dividends and Bullion Shipments, 36. 

MINING SUMMARY-From the various counties 
of California, Nevada, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New 
Mexico, Oregon and Utah, 36-7. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.-Musty Smells in Un- 
tenanted Houses; Repainting an Old Wagon; No Ad- 
vantage; Utilizing Burning Culm-Piles; Bending Plow 
Handles; Fixing Locks; The Rubber Plant in Mexico, 
39. 

GOOD HEALTH. - Dyspepsia— Variety of Human 
Stomachs; Baldness; Poisonous Flowers, 39. 

NEWS IN BRIEF— On page 44 and other pages. 

MISCELLANEOUS.- Assav Ton System of Weights, 

34. Colliery Accident; Relief Funds; Return Air in 
Mines; The Cold Fields of Venezuela; Mountains of 
Mica; Quartz Mining in Amador, 38. Cold Quartz 
Mining 39. The Analysis of Furnace Cases, 40. 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Machinery — hanc & Bodley Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Civil Engineer— Wm. Bredemeyev, Salt Lake City, Utah 



Nothing momentous or especially noteworthy 
to be reported in the category of Passing Events 
this week. We are having a rather cool sum- 
mer at the bay, and. not over hot elsewhere on 
the coast. There is work for almost every class 
of laborers at fair wages in both city and coun- 
try, the farmers in some localities complaining 
of a lack of harvest hands. The grain crop be- 
ing gathered will about come up to the average, 
and the grape crop will be very abundant, which 
is more than can be said of most kinds of fruits 
and berries. The shortage in these, due to the 
hot, high winds of June, is being made mani- 
fest in the high prices ruling for these products, 
and in the somewhat restricted and much inter- 
rupted operations of the larger canneries, which 
find it impossible to procure enough material to 
keep their employes constantly busy. This 
works a great hardship to the many girls and 
poor women who, at this season of the year, 
rely upon these establishments for employment, 
and some of whom are able to put in not more 
than three or four days in tbe course of the 
week. 

Many of the denizens of .San Francisco have 
left the city, the most comfortable place of 
abode in the State or out of it, and gone off to 
enjoy the torments and harrassmeuts of the 
springs and other summer resorts, or to swelter 
in the heat of the interior. They all have a 
royal good time, and are generally glad to get 
back. Meantime the inhabitants of the rural 
districts repair to the city to swelter in the 
fogs and get thoroughly cooled off in the frigid 
clime of San Francisco. 



What the Report of the Director of 
the Mint Shows. 

From advance sheets of the forthcoming re- 
port of H. C. Burchard, Director of the Mint, 
the mines in the United States appear to have 
produced during the year 1S82 nearly two and 
a fourth million dollars less in gold, and over 
three and three-fourths millions more in silver 
than they did in 1SS1. The falling off in the 
product of gold was mainly due to the inter- 
ference with hydraulic mining in this State by 
legal process, and the lessened output of the 
Bodie mines. The yield of gold in Idaho, how- 
ever, decreased to the extent of §'200,000, and 
of Dakota §700,000, Oregon showing also a di- 
minished production. The opinion is expressed 
in this report by Mr. Burchard that the pro- 
duction of gold with us will follow that of other 
countries, and go on diminishing hereafter. 

Canvassing the prospects of the future, we 
feel constrained to dissent from the opinion here 
expressed. It is true, there has been a great 
falling off from the quantity of gold formerly 
taken out in California; the declension during the 
last quarter of a century being even so great as 
Director Burchard states. But the product 
here has probably reached its minimum. Cold 
gathering during the first ten years of its 
existence in this State could hardly be called 
mining. It was little more than collecting the 
metal which nature had already mined for us 
and placed within easy reach. Being so accessi- 
ble, and with so many hands in the field, the 
most of the crop was soon garnered. As re- 
gards the shallow placers, we are now merely 
gleaning the stubble, finding now and then a 
full sheaf hidden in some by-corner of the field, 
or overlooked in the rushing harvest. In the 
deep placers and the quartz veins lies our great 
and permanent wealth in this metal, and these 
stores we are now only just beginning to open 
up in anything like a systematic and efficient 
way. After a few years our annual production 
of gold will sensibly increase; then for a con- 
siderable time it will augment more rapidly, 
only in the remote future again undergoing a 
marked decline. As in California, so in most 
of our other mining States and Territories the 
yield of this metal will sooner or later experi- 
ence some increment, to be kept up for an indefi- 
nite period, and then fall off again. Within an- 
other decade there will Vie some increased pro- 
duction of 'gold all round, though in all proba- 
bility not so great relatively as that of silver. 

The largest gain for the year in silver has oc- 
curred in New Mexico, amounting there to 
nearly two million dollars. The gain in Mon- 
tana amounted to$l, 700,000; in Idaho to #700,- 
000, and in Utah to $400,000, while Arizona 
barely held its own. 

The following table shows the total amount 
of gold and silver taken out in the several 
States and Territories named therein, and the 
production made of each of these metals: 



States and Territories. 


cold. Silver. 


Total. 




§150,001 

UJCS.DDii 
16,800,000 
3,360,000 
3,300,000 
250,000 
1 ,500,000 
-2,550,000 
2,000,000 
1. -,o,oi 10 

100,000 

830,000 
25,000 

190,000 
15.000 

120,000 
5,000 

$32,500,000 






Arizona. 

California 


§7,500,000 
845,000 

1(5,500,000 
175,000 

:',iioo',o00 
4,370,000 
0,750,000 
1,800,000 

25,000 
35,000 


8,565,006 

17,045,000 
10,800,000 
3,475,000 

250,000 


Dakota 

Georgia 




6,920,000 

8,750,000 

1,050,000 

215,000 


Nevada 

New Mexico 


South Carolina. 

Utah 

Virginia 




6, Mill, oon 


0,990,000 










Totals 


§46,800,000 


S7S),300,000 



The dividends made by incorporated com- 
panies in 1SS2 compared with those of 1SS1, 
show a slight falling off, being for the former 
year, as follows: 



States and Territories. 



Arizona, 
Coloradt 
Calif or n 
Dakota , 
Montana 
Nevada , 
Utah. ... 
Idaho . . 
Georgia. 
New Me: 



Mines. 


Amounts. 


5 


§1,887,500 


l(i 


2,320.050 


10 


1,312,047 


3 


1,110,000 


3 


221 ,000 


7 


003,262 


4 


2,129,000 


3 


3S,000 


1 


48,000 


2 


204,000 


54 


§0,930,975 



The above fails to show all the dividends 
realized during the year by incorporated com- 
panies, to say nothing of profits realized by 
incorporated companies and individual miners. 

The number of persons engaged in mining 



during the year was, so far as reported, as fol- 
lows: 

Arizona 4,67S 

California 37,147 

Colorado 28,970 

Dakota 3,570 

Idaho 4 70S 

Montana 4,813 

Nevada 0,074 

New Mexico., 1,406 

Oregon 3,696 

South Carolina 114 

Wyoming , 328 

Utah 2,592 

Total 98,786 

The number of men engaged in mining west 
of the one hundredth meridian is less than 100,- 
000. The total product of bullion made aver- 
ages nearly §1,000 per year for each man en- 
gaged in the business, besides large values real- 
ized from mining, coal, copper, lead, etc. 



Improving on .Further Acquaintance. 

As some persons who disappoint us at first 
improve on furthur acquaintance, so are many of 
the mining districts on this coast which dis- 
appointed the pioneer prospectors, beginning to 
show, under more patient and skillful explora- 
tion, a much greater wealth than they were at 
first supposed to possess. Many localities that 
in the early day were passed by as unworthy of, 
notice, and even sonic in which a good deal of 
work was done, but with results so little en- 
couraging that they were afterwards abandoned 
or nearly so, have in these later times begun to 
attract capital and gather in population by 
reason of the much medium grade ore they 
contain and the promising indications 
shown. It is true, ores can now be 
worked with profit which were entirely 
worthless twenty years ago. Many and nota- 
ble changes have during this period taken place 
in the business of mining, more especially in the 
departments of metallurgy and ore extraction. 
During these years our prospectors and miners 
have learned many things they required to 
know, and forgotten a few that they might bet- 
ter never have learned. They have discovered 
that Comstock and Eberhardt lodes arc few' and 
far between. They have learned that less than 
hundred dollar ore can be worked with profit, 
and forgotten, or at least partially forsaken 
their roving, unstable habits and stock gam- 
bling practices; besides some gains made in other 
forms of grace and other kinds of saving knowl- 
edge. Hence this rehabilitation of the once 
neglected and nearly deserted districts and 
this contentment to there abide and work for 
more moderate but surer returns. This ability 
to subsist at less cost and make living wages 
out of lower grade ores is equivalent to the dis- 
covery of new mineral regions and richer de- 
posits in the olden time. So great is the extent 
of our known mineral domain and so abundant 
its resources that some improvement in the 
habits of our mining population and hi our 
methods of mining is of more moment just now 
than the discovery of new metalliferous regions. 
Our prospectors have already run over too much 
territory making locations and doing little else. 
As a general thing they have too many claims 
with too little work done upon them. The 
miner who has stopped in* one place and proved 
his lodes is apt to have something to show for 
his labor, whereas the persistent prospector has 
generally very little. 

Among other of these partially resuscitated 
districts is the locality known as American 
Flat, two miles south of Virginia city, and 
through which it was at one time confidently 
believed the great Comstock lode was continued 
in that direction, and in the effort to discover 
which, millions of dollars were expended in the 
early day. Proving ineffectual, labor on Ameri- 
can Flat was at last nearly suspended, very 
little having been done there for the past ten 
or twelve years. Recently some very rich ore 
has been struck there by parties working the 
mines on tribute, and the old camp, with its 
dilapidated mills and hoisting works, its aban- 
doned shafts and tunnels, its empty houses 
and generally woe-begone appearance, exhibits 
signs of new life, and it would not be 
strange if something of its ancient importance 
were in course of time restored to it. From 
Pioche and other points in eastern Nevada, from 
Lida valley in the southern part of the 
State, and from divers camps m south- 
eastern California, come like notes of a 
general revival in districts where for years past 
little or nothing had been done. This awaken- 
ing is creditable to the good sense and pluck of 
our miners, and augurs well for the future of 
the business. We shall watch with interest 
and make a note of all other examples of this 
kind brought home to our knowledge. 



The Analysis of Furnace Gases. 



Read at the Boston meeting of the American Insti- 
tute of Mining Engineers, February, 1883, by Mag- 
nus Troilius, chemist to the Midyale Steel Company, 
Philadelphia. 

For some time I have been using with great 
advantage, for the purpose of determining 
rapidly and accurately the chemical composi- 
tion of gases from Siemens' producers, an ap- 
paratus arranged generally like that proposed 
by Prof. Fggertz; * and I now take pleasure in 
laying before the members of the Institute a 
description of the apparatus and its use, hop- 
ing that some of them may find it of practical 
advantage. 

At the end of the paper are given some re- 
sults obtained and heat calculations, with the 
necessary data for the same. 

Collection of Gases. 
Fig. 1 shows the arrangement for taking a 
sample of gas. The funnel, F, which may be 
made of tin plate, is made to fit the test-hole. 
The gas passes up through 'the funnel and 
through the rubber tubing with the glass tube, 
K, filled with asbestos for retaining dust, and 
is drawn into the upper flask by means of water 
flowing from the same into the lower flask. The 
upper flask must be completely filled with water 
from the beginning, so that no air remains. 
When filled with gas the sere w ; compressors 
are securely fastened on, and tbe flask discon- 
nected from the funnel and receiver, (juart 
flasks, with openings at the bottom, are very 
suitable and easily obtainable. 

Composition of the Gases. 
The ingredients found in producer gases arc : 
Carbonic acid (COg ), oxygen (O), ethylene (Ca 
H4 ), carbonic oxide, (C. O), hydrogen (H), and 
marsh gas (CH4 ). The nitrogen is taken by 
difference. COo 0,C2 H4 ,CO are determined 
by absorption in various liquids and by ob- 
serving the resulting diminution of volume. H 
and C H-i arc determined by combustion with 
oxygen. 

Carbonic Acid. For this gas is used a solu- 
tion of 10 grams of potassium hydrate in 100 c. 
c. of water; 4 or 5 c. c. of this solution absorb 
100 c. c. of CO2. 

Oxygen. — Twenty grains of pyrogallic acid 
are dissolved in 100 c. c. of air-free water. For 
use, this is mixed with an equal volume of the 
above potassium hydrate solution. Four e. c. 
of the mixture absorb the oxygen from 100 c. c. 
of air. It should be kept in a dark bottle. 

Ethylene (C2 H 4 ). — A little bromine vapor 
effects the complete absorption of this gas. 

Carbonic Oxide.— Dissolve 15 grams of sub- 
oxide of copper (Cu2 O) in 100 c. c. of hydro- 
chloric acid (1. 19 sp. gr.), at 70" or SO C. under 
a thin layer of paratnue. Keep metallic copper 
in the solution and use a dark bottle. 

Hydrogen and Marsh Gas (CH4 ).- Fig -> 
shows the combustion tube through which the 
mixture of these gases is passed. It is of 
platinum, with .5 mm. internal and 2 mm. ex- 
ternal diameter. At tbe ends it is provided 
with cylinders of German silver for attaching 
rubber tubing. Mr. J. Bishop, of Sugartown, 
Chester county, Pa. , supplies good tubes of 
this kind. 

As seen from the sketch the tube is bent 
into a double coil, and in use it is held in a 
slanting position, the smaller coil only being 
heated to redness during the operation. Very 
rapid combustion takes place in this way. The 
bore of the tube should not be above ."> mm., 
otherwise explosions can occur. 

Complete Analysis. 
Vu.. 3 shows the apparatus for complete gas 
analysis. The gas burette, B, is graduated to 
100 e. c. capacity. It is connected with the 
funnel at the top, by means of a three-way stop- 
cock, which can be turned so as to communi- 
cate with either the funnel or the pipette, P, of 
•200 c. c. capacity. Between the pipette and 
the burette the combustion tube is suspended. 
A screw compressor is applied between the 
combustion tube and the three-way stop- 
ock; this compressor is used, during the com- 
bustion, as the chiul regulator of speed for the 
gas mixture, passing from B to V and returning 
to B. The flasks F and I-" can be raised or 
lowered by means of the stands S and S', with 
movable shelves or brackets, as shown. 

At the lower end of the burette an ordinary 
glass stopcock is placed; a three-way stopcock 
would, however, also work very well here, as it 
is necessary, during the operation, to connect 
alternately with a suction pump and the flask, 
F. Before reading off' the volume, the gas is 
compressed a few centimeters by raising the 
fiask, F, and letting it bubble up through a 
little water in the funnel. In this way the gas 
is made to assume the same pressure as the air. 
The volume may now be taken, either by hold- 
ing F so that the water therein is on the same 
level as the water in the burette, or simply by 
letting in water from a funnel as long as it will 
run. I prefer the former mode. The cylinder, 
C, is rilled with water and holds a centigrade 
thermometer. The .temperature can thus be 
observed and kept constant during the entire 
analysis. This is of importance in accurate 
work, as the gas expands according to the 
formula v (1 -I ,004t°), or about .4 c. c. for every 
degree centigrade. 

To start an analysis, draw out a few cubic 
centimeters of water by means of the suction 
pump, taking care to have the screw com- 
pressor at the top well closed, and the funnel 
shut off, when the lower stop-coek is open. 
Let a few cubic centimeters of the potas- 



■ Jernkontoretg Auualer, 1882 



July 21, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



slum hydrate Rotation flow into (he burette 
from the funnel. Almost .ill I h 
bonic add U taken up when the alkaline Liquid 
Bows down slowly aloe burette. 

It u well, however, to take out the burette 
from the holder, and move a Let the 

liquid flow slowly backwarda and forward*. 

i. hydrate is then careful] . 
out by repeatedly drawing off the liquid from 
tli<- bottom of the burette by means ol the buc 
tion pump, and tatting pun- water flon 
the top of burette; I 

i* then read off. The other gases are then taken 
in the same way, by introducing the proper ab- 

GAS COLLECTOR 
Scale.!'. U 




sorbent, observing that in the case of ethylene 
iking of the burette is required, as the 
In*. mine vapors till the burette. 

Kmli reagent must be carefully washed out 
before introducing another, ami they must be 
used in the order described -namely, potassium 
hydrate for carbonic acid, pyrogallic acid for 
oxygen, bromine fpr ethylene, aubchloride of 
copper for carbonic oxide. A little hydro- 
chloric ncid must be added to the first water 
used For washing out the last named reagent, as 
otherwise a white precipitate of basic copper 
chloride will come down. 

Potassium hydrate would expel carbonic ox 
ide from its solution in subchloride of copper. 
Both hydrochloric acid and bromine give a ten- 
sion to the gas, but this is obviated by careful 
washing before reading off. More shaking is 
required to effect the absorption of the carbonic 
oxide than in the ease of the other gases. 

The absorbing influence of water does not 
practically interfere with the results if the gas 
is analyzed soon after taking the sample. If 
the gas be allowed to stand in contact with wa- 
ter For any length of time, the carbonic acid 
will be partly or wholly absorbed, while the 



volume, i* consequently obtained From the 
formula; 

M being the total diminution of volume after 

combustion, and <■ the volume of tin 

acid From the marsh gas. I urid is. 

, detennined i-< previously described. 

| the volume of the marsh gas direct, 

Fig, I shows a simpler burette without glass 

, chiefly intended for the del 

tiou of carbonic acid, oxygen and carbonic oxide 

only. By inserting a T tube between the fun- 

ml auA burette, a more extended use may be 

had of this very simple and convenient ap- 

ln this case, however, I 

not be used f«.r the ethylene, as it would attack 
the robber-tubing. Sulphuric acid, in a special 
using the other reagents, 
could be used instead. Pro do nol 

as a nil.-, however, contain any considerable 
amounts of marsh gas tygen, andforprae- 



COMBUSTION TUBE 
HALF SIZE 




=o 



to multiply the CO, Ca Hi H and Ca Hi 
as found from the table, by the number 
of heat units belonging to each of those gases 
per one liter ;it Q < ' at 7d0 mm. pi 
numb* n ding t<> Bunaen : 

lor hydrogi oed to Hs O, which 

condenses). 

I'm- carbonic oxide, 3007. 

fur marsh gas, 8482. 

For ethylene, L3982. 

One volume of hydrogen requires for combos 
tiou to one volume of water, one half its volume 
I "1. of air). 

of carbonic oxide requires for its 
combustion to one volume ol carbonic acid, one 
half its voluui- ..i oxygen <- '. vol. of air). 

< Ine volume of marsh gas requires two volumes 
10 vol. of air) lor its combustion, to 
one volume oi cai l>onic acid and two volumes of 
water. 

One i oi ethylene requires for its coin- 



GAS APPARATUS 

FOR 

PARTIAL ANALYSIS 




Fig.2 

other seises suffer but very slight diminution in 
volume. 

After removing the carbonic acid, oxygen, 
ethylene and carbonic oxide, as above described, 
about 20 c.c. of pure oxygen are taken into the 
pipette P. This is an ample quantity for de- 
termining by combustion the amounts of hydro- 
gen and marsh gas, usually contained in about 
100 c.c. of producer-gases. As a safeguard 
against explosions, the rule may be observed 
that the sum of the volumes of the- gases taking 
part in the combustion must not exceed one- 
half of the total volume of the gases in the bu- 
rette. 

To mix the gases in the burette with oxygen, 
the flasks F and F' are raised and lowered alter- 
nately, and the speed of flow of gas regulated 
by means of the screw-compressor at the top of 
burette. When thus mixed, the volume of the 
gas mixture is read off and the combustioiMube 
gently heated while the gas is passed at the rate 
of about 10 c.c. per minute from B to P. The 
smaller platinum coil is then heated to full red- 
ness, and the gases are drawn back from P to 
B. Complete combustion of hydrogen and 
marsh gases then takes place in the tube; vapor 
of water, which condenses, and carbonic acid 
are formed; one volume of hydrogen giving one 
volume oTwater and one volume of marsh gas, 
giving one volume of carbonic acid and two vol- 
umes of water. 

The actual number of cubic centimeters rep- 
resenting the free hydrogen in the original gas 



Fig.3 

tical purposes these gases may be left out of the 
analyses altogether". 

£ nalyses and Calculations of Heat 

In a special table below are given the results 
of eight analyses of producer-gases by the method 
described. The first six samples were taken from 
the blast-producers of Messrs. Hoopes & Town- 
send, of Philadelphia, These producers were 
designed by their mechanical engineer, Mi-. 
Ferdinand Philips. Sample No. 1 was taken 
from a producer into which the blast was forced 
by means of a fan. In all the other cases the 
blast was forced in by means of steam-injectors. 
Anthracite coal was used in all the producers. 

The last two analyses in the table were taken 
from the Siemens 1 draft-producers for the open 
hearth plant at the Midvale Steel Works, using 
soft coal. 

To find the total amount of heat-units that 
can be developed by the complete combus- 
tion of 100 liters of one of the gases at 
0° C, and 700 mm. pressure, one has only 



Sculu, 1 Fig.4 

liustiou to two volumes of carbonic acid and 
two volumes of water, three volumes of oxygen 
(15 vol. of air). 

These four combustions are chemically ex- 
pressed thus: 

Hydrogen; 

2H H- O 



'2 vol. 1 vol. 

Carbonic Oxide: 



CO 

•2 vol. 

Marsh I las: 

CH 4 l- 

■1 vol. 
Kthylene: 
C 3 H 4 I 



O 
1 vol. 



: vol. 



41) 
-1 vol. 

b'O 
U vol. 



C0 2 

'-> vol. 

2C0 2 

4 vol. 



H 2 0. 
■J vol, 

( •< ),. 

2 vol. 
2H 2 O. 



4 vol. 
2H 2 0. 
4 vol. 



liter, at 0* and'760 nun. pressure <>i nitrogen, 
carbonio acid, and vapor of water are (Bun- 

Forni- — . HOT 

Po i n'l ic acid — .425 

Fur vapor of water — ..'is-.' 

By aid of these data the theoretical or flame 

temperatures <■! the gases are calculated. In 

these i sleulations it i 

i with the least p 

amount ol sir, and that the heat is entirely 

taken up by the products o vis.: 

carbonic acid, vapor of water, and the nil 
v- in< i' v: i- pai i ]_\ present in tin- gas befoi 
bustion, and partly carried along with the air 
t.n oombuation. 

limitation ui tin' Same temperature i* 
best illustrated by an example. Take, for in- 
stance, gas No. 10 (vide table). We have 
93 (3.9 •-■:.:: 1.4) .42.. hit. 4 54.6 - 

11.21 .:t07] T .,14 2.8 iT Kill) 2.8 

.382. 

This equation may In- transformed thus: 
93966 (476 2.8) [(3.9 . 27. :; . 1.4) .425 I 

(iT. 4 54 6 li.2i ,::n7 2.8 .3821 T v T 

= 16640 C. 

This latter equation gives a good general ride 
for calculating the tla temperature "f a gas 

as follows: 

Put the number of calorics per 100 liters, 
minus 476 times the volume of the water formed 
by combustion of 100 liters, equal to the tem- 
perature sought, multiplied by an expression 
consisting of a sum obtained by multiplying the 
C0 2 , H 2 0, ami N with their respective specific 
heats per liter and adding the products to- 
gether. 



The latent heat of vapor of water per liter is 
(Bunsen) 514 heat units. The specific heat, per 







HOOPES & 


TOWNSKND. 




MinVALF 








I'UILI.TI'S' 


I'RODI CBR, 




HIBMRNS 1 I'lliilircKC. 




;, 


y. 


'J. 


■y. 


'S. 


'S. 




Cfl 


Oj 


ANALYSES! 


6 


5 = 

Is 


a 5 


r_ O 

O 


= ? 


E-~ ST £ 


d 5 




FURNACE (JASKM. 


11 

■ i 




i? 

aq a- 


; 1 


5 w 

: g 


7-g; S 

o 5S--5' 




05 ^ 






: X 

■ a 


: a 




; 3 1 

' a. 




I Sat 


: Si. 


% o' 


II 












V 


■ 




s 





Jarbonic acid CO., 


3.0 


S.7 


9.3 


7.5 


8.0 


6.1 


5.7 


1.5 


5.9 























Carbonic oxide, CO 


27.3 


'20.0 


18.5 


10.0 


15.5 


22.3 


15.4 


23.0 


17.7 






8.7 


8.6 


IS. 3 


14.9 


28.7 


8.3 


0.0 


9.S 


Marsh gas, CH 4 ..7 .. 


1.4 


1 2 


2.7 


1.8 




1.0 


3.S 


3.0 


2.4 


Nitrogen (difference), X 


117. 4 


61.4 


62.9 


59.3 


61.6 


41.9 


05.0 


0F..9 


114. L 


100.0 


lOU.U 


100.0 


100.0 


10U.U 


1O0.0 


j 100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


Calorics pr. 100 litres at o° and 700 






















83U66 
1019° 


97184 
105S° 


!l!lil7l 
1575" 


111474 
1700" 


92620 
1613* 


1841(14 
1840' 


110753 
1656" 


114939 
1701- 


103843 
1042' 







Iron and Civilization. 

It is quite common among political econo- 
mists, says the Iron An', to measure the ad- 
vancement of a nation toward the plane of a 
high civilization by its consumption of such 
products as indicate the nearest approach to 
the perfect development of mechanical skill, or 
the wide-spread existence of diversified indus- 
try. There is no douht that the most civ- 
ilized nations use the higheat quarterly per 
capita of every useful product. Such nations 
not only provide themselves with food in great 
plenteousness and variety, but they also clothe 
themselves and furnish tlicir homes with care 
and taste, provide the best facilities fur trans- 
portation, and the machinery best calculated for 
perfect work, by which all their needs and lux- 
uries are supplied. Wool and iron are perhaps 
the two largest and most important factors by 
which a nation's superiority may be thus meas- 
ured, and are each referred to as furnishing 
tests for comparing the relative advancement 
in the arts and sciences and in the social condi- 
tion of different peoples. 

It will be interesting in this connection to 
notice the actual consumption of the principal 
factor, iron, by several of the leai'.ing nations 
of the earth. It will be observed that the 
United States heads the list, followed, at quite 
a distance, however, by f^ruat Britain, France, 
(iermany, etc : 

COUSTRIKH. Tons. 

United States 0,065,019 



(ji'uat Britain 
Fran 



Knssi:i 
Austria 
Belgium. 



4,618,932 
2,508,706 

j.iss,!ir,: 
965,000 
625, 



Italy 260,000 



Holland . 

Sun 



-■In 



Brazil.... 
Turkey . . . 
Portugal.. 
Mexico. . . 



208,494 
190,01 o 
75,756 
65,0C0 
58.6C0 
48,823 



NOTES. \a ami 16, from different producers but at the same time; 2a and 2b, do.; 3a and 36, from the same pro- 
ducer, The last two analyses from Midvale belong together, being taken with half-hour interval. 



As Americans, we have no fault to find with 
the showing, even though a per capita calcula- 
tion be entered into to reach, by the afore- 
mentioned sale, the relative degree of civiliza- 
tion between ourselves and our sister nations. 
In the production of the raw material, however, 
the showing is not so flattering; and it is all the 
more suggestive, from the fact that no nation 
on the globe excels our own in the natural fa- 
cilities for producing this most essential of all 
the products of industry. 

It appears from the statistics of the various 
countries that three parts of the whole quantity 
of pig iron are produced in England, America 
and (iermany, the remainder being contributed 
by France, Belgium, Austria, Russia, Sweden, 
Spain, Turkey, Italy, Australia, Japan, Switzer- 
land, Canada, Mexico, and, in very small pro- 
portions, a few other countries. In 1SS2, the 
production of pig iron in Fingland rose to 
8,493,2S7 tons; in America, to 4,u'-23,323 tons; 
and in (iermany, including Luxemburg, to 
3,170,000 tons. The production last year of 
these three countries was consequently 10,- 
286,010 tons, while that of the whole world 
amounted to 21,00OiG00 tuns. Clreat Britain 
has, therefore, contributed about 40 per cent of 
this quantity, the United States about 22 per 
cent, and Germany about 15 per cent; more- 
ever, the American out-turn equaled 54 per cent 
of the German, and 37 per cent of the English, 




Mining and Scientific Press. 



tletalllifg y and dreg. 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

No. 23 STEVENSON STREET, 

Near First and Market Streets, S. F. 

Establibbbd, 1869. C. A. LooKHiMJT, Manager. 

Ores Worked by any Process. 
Ores Sampled. 
Assaying in all its Branches. 
Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Waters, Etc 
Working Tests (Practical) Made. 
Plans and Specifications furnished for the 
most suitable process for working Ores. 

Special attention paid to Examinations of 
Mmos, plans and reports furnished, 

C. A. LUCKHABDT & CO, 
(Formerly Huhn & Luckhardt.) 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgists 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO,. 

IMF0RTBR8 OF AND DEALERS IN 

Assayers' Materials, 

MINE and MILL SUPPLIES, 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS AND CHEMICALS, DRUG- 
GISTS' GLASSWARE AND SUNDRIES, Etc. 

118 and 120 Market Street, and 15 and 17 
California St., San Francisco, 

We would call the attention of Assayers, Chemists, 
Mining Companies, Milling Companiea, Prospectors, etc., 
to our full stock of Balances, Furnaces, Muffles, Cruci- 
bles, Scoriflers, etc., including, alao, a full stock of 
Chemicals. 

Having been engaged in furnishing these supplies since 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast, we feel 
confident from our experience we can well suit the de- 
mand for these troods both as to quality and price. Our 
New Illustrated Catalogue, with prices, will be sent on 
application. 

*grOur Gold and Silver Tables, showing the value per 
ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and valuable 
tables for computation of assays in grains and grammes, 
will be sent free upon application. Agenta tor the Patent 
Plumbago Crucible Co. , London, England. 

JOHN TAYLOR & OO. 



• METALLURGICAL WORKS, 
318 Pine St., (Basement), 



Corner of Leidcsdorff Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Ores Sampled and Assayed, and Tests Made by any 
Process. 
Assaying and Analysis of Ores, Minerals and Waters. 
Mines examined and reported on. 
Piactical Instruction given in Treating OreB by ap- 
proved processes. 

Q. KUSTEL & CO.. 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgist 



OTTOKAR HOFMANN, 

Metallurgist and Mining Engineer. 

Erection of Leaching and Chlorination Works a 
specialty. Address, 

Cor. Fifth and Bryant Sts., 

SAN PEANOISCO, CAL. 

WM. D JOHNSTON, 
ASSAYER AND ANALYTICAL CHEMIST, 

113 Leidesdorff Street, 

Bet. California and Sacramen o Sts., SAN FliANCISCO 
ASSAY1NU TAUGHT. 

larPeraonal attention insures Correct Returns. Ta 



THOS. PRICE'S 

Assay Office and Cheniica 1 
Laboratory, 

6y4 Sacramento St.. S. F. 

EDWARD BOOTH, 

Chemist and Assayer, 

No. 110 Sutter St., S. P. * 




San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works 

J. W. QUICK, Manufacturer, 

Several first premiums receivt d 
for Quartz Mill Screens, and Per 
forated Sheet Metals of ever) 
description. 1 would call Bpe-eia 
attention to my SLOT CUT am 
SLOT PUNCHED SCREENS 
which are attracting much at 
tention and giving unversa 
satisfaction. This is the onlj 
establishment on the coast de 
voted exclusively to the manufac- 
ture of Screens. Mill owners using Battery Screens erten 
■flivdly can contract for large supplies at favorable rates. 
Orders solicited and promptly attended to. 

82 Fremont Street. San Francisco. 

JOHN BERGSTROM, 

ORGAN BUILDER. 

29th. and Mission Sts. 

[Established 1351.] 



INGERSOLL ROCK DRILLS 




Mining Machinery. 

For Catalogue"", Estimate?, Etc., addioss 

Berry & Place Machine Comoanv. 

PARKE & LACY, Proprietors.) 

8 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Established 1864. 



THE MOREY & SPERRY MINING MACHINERY CO.. 



WARKROOM8 : 
& 94 Liberty St., Ntw York. 




[E accentors to MOaEY & SPlSRRY.J 

Manufacturers of allkindsof- 



Mine and Mill Machinery 



WORKS ! 



The Foundry and Machine Shop h(i..'iig hcen eul'-.rfted we are i;i. w prcpfKed . . 
makefroin the most improved .-atteriB QLTART2 aid SFAIWP M ILLS complete, :or 
— rkmg GOLD and SILVJiK ORES 



IIOREY'S IMPROVED PUL7EEI2EE, 

For WET or DRY Crushing. 

**m SIMPLE, EFFICIENT and DURABLE 



^ The Balls revolve HiirizoiUiUlv without rictioo, 
2siS ft, size, weight 7. OCO lb*., and does more work tnan 15 
*** Stamps, 3 ft, size, weigh 3.uuu lbs. 

Concent) ating Mils, Rock Breakers, Amalgamating 

Pans od Separatois, Rtasting Furnaces, Hoisting and 

, Engines a d Boilers, aDy size 

(liauts and Pine, Ore Cars, Ore 

i. The Hand Power Two-stamp 

-Will, weight 280 11.3. THE EUREKA WTRK HOPE 

TRAMWAYS, Concenti atiog Riffles for Mills and Hy 

draulic Sluices. 

^teel SHOES aud DIES fo r Stamps, and Mine and Mill Supplies. Agenta for IMLAY ORE CONCENTRATOR and the 
MINERS' HAND ROCK DRILL. Information and Estimates cheerfully given IS mil lor 4'ufnlOgiiC. 

Address, THE MOREY & SPERkY MINING MACHINERY CO. 



I "J Pans od Separatois, 
I Pumping Machinery, 
silky required, Hydraulic (1 
pWIJa Buckets, Safety Cages 



MORBY'S IMPROVED PULVERIZER. 



ANTI-SCALE COMPOUND 

Manufactured by RICKARD & DURDEN. 

We guarantee that, with proper use, tbia Compound will retrieve end prevent all 

INCRUSTATI ON IN STEAM BOILERS. 

Ten years trial, in widely soparatrd lo calitiee, hbS deinom'ratid the value of this invention, and its applicability 
to different qualities of water. References cheerfully furnished to any one wishing same. 

*s-ten pound sample box furnished free ON APPLICATION. Tj» 

BERRY & PLACE MACHINE CO., Sole Agents, 

No. 8 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



[July 21, 1883 



JKlipipg tyigipeBjrs. 

B. SALAZAR, 

Mining Engineer and Melallurgisf. 

Graduate of Freiberg and Clausthal Royal Mining 
Schools, Germany. 

ILL FURNISH ACCURATE REPORTS ON MINKS 
in the Hinted States and Mexico. Also, act as 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 



w 



id MIMMi 



To Companies on all MKTALLUKGICAL ai 
MATTERS. 

Starting up Tuxnels, Smelting or Leaching 
Works a Specialty. 

Several years' Practical Experience in Arizona and Mex- 
co. Would take charge of a mine or reduction works. 

TEMPORARY OFFICE with Kiutel & Co., 318 Pine St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Luther Waoonbk, C. E., M. E. 

Joun Hays Hammond, M. E. 

Wagoner & Hammond, 
MINING ENGINEERS. 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, and 

Alamos, So- o> a, Ldex co 
Special attention to the des-imiug; and cuibirut'i n of 
Concentration Works for f- 11 oep. Gradual rtduciiun by 
rolling impact, e at>siflcation by air currents, improved 
[minted boxes and corrugated rubber and iron Rittinger 
tables, 

^^"Correspondence and samples solicited from parties 
having low-grade properties. 

MINES REPORTED UPON. 



GEORGE MADEIHA, 

Geologist and Mining Engineer. 

Reports on mines furnished ; Estimates of Machinery 
etc. Special attention paid to the examination of mines 
in Mexico, California, Arizona and New Mexico. Thirty 
ytars in the mines of the above States. 

SI HABLA I0SPA NOLA I 

Address, care this office or SANTA CRUZ, CAL. ' 



W.W. BAILEY, 

Mechanical Ei\gir\eer 3 

Room 22, Stock Exchange, S. F. 
Plans and Spoc'fications tarnished for Hoisting, Pump- 
ing, Mill, Mining and other Machinery. Machinery in- 
spected and erected. 



READY FOR DELIVERY. 

LATHES, DRILLING MACHINES, PLANING MACHINES 

And Other Machine Tools. 

STRONG, DURABLE AND SUPERIOR TO IMPORTED MACHINES. 

Wheel Cutting to Order. 
SAW FRANCISCO TOOL CO., 21 Stevenson St.. S. T. I 



SCHOOL OF 

Practical, Civil, Mechanical and Min 
ing Engineering, 

SURVEYING, DRAWING AND ASSAYING, 
^4 PoBt Street, San Francisco 

A. VAN DER NA 1LLEN, Principal. 

Spnd for Olr^nlar. 

W. C. JOHNSON, Engineer, 

Fltchhurg, Mass., 

Engines, Mining and Railroad Macliiuery and Supplies 

PURCHASED ON COMMISSION. 

Correspondence Solicited. Calf omia and Nevada Itefe r- 
ences. Full advantages of falling pi ices in Eastern 
markets neeured our customers 



Redlands. 



The most delightfully situated colouy i i 
Southern California. 

Remarkably healthy, being 2,000 feet above 
the sea level. 

Wholly devoted to fruit culture, and espe- 
cially adapted to oranges and raisins. 

Advantages of church, school, store, depot, 
hotel, stage line, telegraph and telephone. 

Illustrated Circulars on Application. 

JUDSON&BROWN, 

Redlands, 

SAN BERNARDINO. CALIFORNIA. 



CORRESPONDENCE is cordially solicited from reliable 
sources upon all topics of interest and value to our readers. 



July 21, 1883.J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



o^xo^co ITR^SER & CHALMERS, xx^iktois 

MANUFACTURERS OF IMPROVED AND APPROVED FORMS OF 



U mule extensive additions to our Shops and Machinery, we htTe now the LARGEST and BEST AP- 
POINTED SHOPS lo the West. We ire prepared to build from the LsUwl aiu Moat Approved Patterns, 



QUARTZ MILLS 



For working gold and silver ores by wet or dry crushing. The St«.-t*_-f»-1-lt. Howell's Improved White, Bruntou'e A' 
Brubknv Furnaces, for working base ores. Rotary Dryers, Steufeldt Improved Dry Kiln Furnaces. 

SMELTING FURNACES, 

Water Jackets, either Wrought m out Iron, made In section- 01 Ithsr round, ohloojr, oval or square. Our 

patUiniH in. --it t-w.. ■■■'.■ ii PBCIAL FURNACES KOK OOPPBB SMKLTIN'i;. Slay Pots and Cars. Improved 

form. Bul'lou and Copper Moulds and Ladles, Litharge Cars uod Pots, Cupel Furnaces and Can. 



Frue Ore Concentrator, or Vanner Mills. 

Coarse Con cent rat I tic Works. infl Rollers, Sircrs, Trommels, I -i. and all other 

adjuncts for the m ■ ■ ■ ti i. in every detail, 

ii \ i.i.i m i : improvkd OWE TRAMWAYS. We refer to Gen. Custei mine, idnho, 5,000 foot long; 

Columbus Mine, Col., 4,7&0 feet long; Mary Murphy mine, OoL, &,0W feet lo&g, all in coast) I | 

LEACHING MILLS, 

Improved Corliss and Plain Slide Valve Meyers Cut-off Engines. 

CORLISS KNtllNKSfr ZxSfl OyUoden £0 80*60. PLAIN 8LIDE VALVI8 from 6*10 lo 38x30. BOH ER 

.<( I'vury torn), mutio of I'iiiL' Iruii Woiitv C. H. No. 1 t-~l.'tiik;<' Ii Ml. Wurkroaturiilp thu moBt curcftil. All 

Hiveui Hand Driven. 



HOISTING ENGINES 



Larue or SiiirII for tint or round rope. Double Cylinder Knfffnce. from 6x10 to 18x00. This latter size furnished J. R. Biggin for Otant and Old Abe Co , Black 
imping Engines, MJxOO, lot SolaUog and Pumping Works, for 2,000 feet deep. Baby HoUts for Pro.pectlnif, 4 U. P. lo G H. P. 



Wire Rope, Safety Cages and any Size and Forms of Cars. 

Principal Office and Works, Fulton and Union Sts., Chicago, Illinois. 



McCaskell's Patent Car Wheels and Axles- Best in Use. 

New York Office, Walter McDermott, Manager, Room 32, No. 2 Wall St. 



CONTINENTAL WORKS, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Due's Mechanical Atomizer or Pulverizer. 

For reducing to ni Impalpable powder all kinds of hard and brlltlo rilhatancos, Bucb tut QUAUTZ, EUERY, CORUNDUM, GOLD 
AND SILVER ORES, BAR! I'KS. COAL, OC1IKK, MAVuANESE, IRON OUKi, 

PHOSPHATE I^OCK:, ETC. 

It is slmp'oand rot liable to get out of ordor. Revolving Shell being constructed of SiemcnH-Martin steel, and all parts mechanic* 
in ilr-i^n n.id of orst -class construct! m. Weight 5,500 lbs.; heaviest piece, 1,500 lbs. it will pulverize 7 to 10 Tons In 10 Hours 
with 30 II. P. For circulars and :u. 1 particulars apply to or address, 

THOS F. ROWLAND. Sole Mm'fr. Brooklyn, N. Y. 




SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO., 

418 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery 
And Assay Office. 

HIQUS8T PRICKS PAID FOR 

Gold, Sliver and Lead Ores and Sulpharets. 

Manufacturers of Bluestone. 

ALSO, LEAD PIPE, SHEET LEAD, SHOT, ETC. 

This Company has the best facilities on the Coast 
for working 

GOLD, SILVER and LIAD 

IN THEIR VARIOUS FORMS. 
PRENTISS SELBY, - - Superintendent 



COPP'S u. s 

Laws, Forms 



MINERAL LANDS, 



Hasuosurplus verbiage. ContainB Dr. Raymond's Glos- 
sary. Explains ho w to examine mi nine titles. Contains 
numerous court decisions. Gives the Public Land Com- 
missions Codiflcai ion, and gives many an d improved forms, 

Price -Full law binding, extra paper, $G.00. 
For Sale by DEWEY & CO., San Francisco. 

San Francisco Cordage Factory. 

Established 1856. 
Constantly on hand a full assortment of Manila Rope, 
Sifla Rope, Tarred Manila Rope, Hay Rope, Whale 
Line, etc., etc. 
Extra sizes and lengths made to order on short notice 
TTJBBS & CO.. 
011 and 618 Front Street, San Francisco 

Patent Life -Saving Respirator. 

FBEVBNT8 I. BAD POISONING AND SALIVATION. 
Invaluable to those 
engaged in dry crush- 
ng iiuaxt/. mills, quick- 
silver uiinea, white lead 
corroding, feeding 
thrashing machines 
und all occupations 
where the surrounding 
atinoBphere in filled 
with dust, obnoxious 
hid ell a or poisonous 
vapors. The Respira- 
tors are sold subject 
to approval after trial, 
and, if not satisfactory, 
the price wid be re- 
funded. Price, §3 
each, or $30 per dozen 
Address all comniuni 
cations and orders 
to 

H. H. BROMLEY, Sole Agent, 

43 Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




FOR SALE 

By J. M. LAKENAN, of Grass Valley Foun- 
dry, Grass Valley, Cal. 

One SO-inch bore engine, 24-inch stroke; oiTc 18-inch 
bore engine, 40-inch stroke, Meyer's cut-off; one 14-inch 
bore engine, 86-inch stroke, Meyer's cut-off; two 12-inch 
boreongincsj 30-inch stroke; two sets heavy pumping gear, 
with bob and connecting rod irons, etc.; 450 feet of L6-Inch 
pump pipe of 1-ineh iron, heav> flanges; besides other 

mining and nulling machinery. 
For information, address 

J. M. LAKENAN, 

(trass Valley, Cal. 



WH. BAffTLINO. HHHRT KIMBALL 

BARTLING- & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS 

Paper Kulers & Blank Book Manufacturer? 

605 Olay Street,(aouthwcBt. comer Sansome), 

BAN FRAK0IBC0. 



MILL & MINING MACHINERY. 



Mo. 



oo 



F. A. HUNTINGTON, 

Fremont Stieet. - - San Francisco, Cal. 




CTD 



This machine requires less power, less care or attention, and \b less liable to get out of repair than any concentra- 
tor now in use. All of which any practical miner will comprehend when seeing it in operation. 

The wear and tear is nominal, and the construction so simple that any miner can put it up and run it; and the low 
price brings it within the reach of all mill men, a* it will Bave enough to pay for itself in any mill in a very shc-t 
time. One machine will concentrate the tailings from a five-stamp battery. 



"F". .A. JHZTJj^TTIIsrOTOnsr'S 



a 

LU 
LU 



=3 

C9 



CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER QUARTZ MILL! 



After running one of these mills on the Whiddeu mine, in El Dorado county, over four mouths, and thoroughly 
testing Us capacity and durability, I am prepared to offer It to the mining public, am 1 claimjfor it the following 
advantages o\cr the drop stamp mill : 

1. '.I. hr cost of same capacity is not more than one-half that of stamps. 

2. Freight to mine one-fourth that of stamps. 

3. Cost of erection at mine one-tenth that of stamps. 

4. It runs with one-third the power per ton of ore crushed. * 

6. The wear is less than that of stamps. 

0. Tha wearing parts are easily duplicated. 

7. It has a n uch better discharge, and leavf s the pulp in better condition for concentrating. 

5. It is a better Amalgamator, saving fully nine-tenths of the gold in t:»e mill; the balance cu» he saved on 
plates in the usual manner. 

9. It is continually crushing; not like the stamp, using powor to suspend it in air ninety-nine one-hundredt.lis 
of the time, and the balance making a thundering noise, and accomplishing comparatively small results. It is as fT 
in advance of the stamp mill as the present method of making Hour with improved rolls is over the Indian's mode of 
crushing corn in a stone mortar, 

F A. IIiryTINCrPOS, ESQ.— Dear Sir: Your Centrifugal Roller Quartz Mill Has run on the Whidden Gold 
Mining Company's property, at Shingle Springs, El Dorad > county, Oil., about four months, and it did good ami 
satisfactory work; a greater portion of gold remaining in the mill than in a stamp battery. 

VRV.D. JONES, Supt. 

SHINGLE MACHINES AND SAWMILL MACHINERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



This paper is printed, with Ink Manufac- 
tured, by Charles Eneu Johnson & Co., 5» -v 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch OW- 
cea _47 Rose St., New York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Chicago. Aprent for the Pacific Coaut- 
Joseph H. Dorety, 529 ComifltirfiiaJ St. S F. 



LAND 



Rood laud tinai wilt raise a crop evorj 

year, over 12,000 acres for sale in tuts to 
suit. Very desirable Fruit, Vine, Grain, 
Vegetable, Hay, and Pasture Land. 

Near Railroad and Sacramento river; t3to $30 per acre. 

W I and water convenient. V. S. Title perfect. Send 

stamp for illustrated circular, to EDWARD FRISBIE, 

I'l'oioi'i'ii' ol' liea.liny Hunch, Anderson, Shasta Co., Cal. 



N. W. SPAULDING'S 



* 



^' 






-h «*v 



v 7 






7T 



~^b%& 



PATENT DETACHABLE TOOTH SAWS, 

Manufactory. 17 «j 19 Fremont St.. S. F. 



H. H. BROMLEY. 

Dealer in Leonard tt Ellis Celebra'od 

-TRADE M, 





STEAM CYLINCEE AND MACHINE OILS, 
The Best and Cheapest. 

Theae Superior Oils cannot be purchased through dealer 
and are sold direct to oonsamer only by H. H. BROMLEY, 
sole dealer in these goeds 

Reference— Any first-class Engine or Machine Bui Id t in 
America. Addiesa, 43 S acriinieiito St,, 6. F. 



ITHEBESTilN USE! 



This is the only Seientilically Constructed Bucket in 
the market. It is ttiu k out from charcoal etampinr 
iroD. No corners to catch. No spams to burst. No 
interior corners to clog up. It runs with gre.it srso, and 
half the power of the old stvlo bucket. WILL OUT- 
WEAR HALF A DOZEN OF TUEM, 

PRICES REDUCED. 

T. F. ROWLAND, Sole Mfr. 

Brooklyn, IV. Y. 

H. P. GREGORY & CO., Agents, San Francisco, Cat., 
carry a stock ef all Bizes. 



PACIFIC POWER CO. 

Room with steam power to let in the 
Pacific Power Co.'s new brick building, 
Stevenson street, near Market. Eleva- 
tor in building. Apply at the Com- 
pany's office, 314 California stroet. 



ROCK DRILL 

FOR MINES, (JUARRIE3, ETC. 

J. CTJYAS, Agent. 

10 Park Place, - - New York. 



RICHARD C. REMMEY, Agent, 

Philadelphia Chemical Stoneware Manufactory, 

1100 East Cumberland St., Piiiladrli'Mia, Pa. 



Manuiact urer of 

all kinds of 




I 5=^ ^ -3 **© f£2ba Manufacturing 

u 'aau^oT.mu ^"q JaciojI Chemists. ■ 

\ m i\ZJ V & [Jj* r aT i Also Chemical Bricks 

\s»j/ toSFH*imuit.j<.tfa£ns&, v \ „ , J f or Clover Tower, 






44 



Mining and 'Scientific Press. 



[July 21, 1883 



Patents and Inventions, 

List of U. S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inyentors. 

From the official list of U. S. Patents in Dewey & Co.'s 
Scientific Press Patent Agencv, 252 Market St., b. t 

For Week Ending July 10, 1883. 
281,004.— Rotary Engine— J. J. Blair, Tacoma, 
W. T. 
281,027.— Ventilation— W. T. Cottier, Napa, 

Cal. 

281,037.— Steam Boiler— P. F. Dundon, S. F. 

280.821.— Roller Skate— W. B. Higgins, S, F. 

280,929.— Fulling Mill— R. H. H. Hunt, S. F. 

281,084.— Solar Fruit Drier— W. P. Kirkland, 
S. F. 

280,834.— Lift Pump— H. C. Eangrehr, S. F. 

280,835.— Compound Pump— PI. C. Eangrehr, 
S. F. 

281,087.— Endless Chain Carrier for ( oal— 
LesourdS Lotan, Portland, Or. 

->8i 090— Refrigerating and Ice Machine— 
Hugh Logan, S. F. 

280.845.— Screwdriver — A. McLellan, Port- 
land, Or. 

281,100.— Head-block Gear for Sawmills— 
M. C Meeker, Occidental, Cal. 

281,114. — Inhaler — S. A. Morse, S. F. 

280,882.— Treating Alcoholic Liquors with 
Electricity — A. C. Tichenor, Alameda, Cal. 

Note.— Copies of U. S. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by tele- 
graph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent busi- 
ness for Pacific coast Inventors transacted with perfect 
security and in the shortest possible time. 



Notices of Recent Patents. 

Among the patents recently obtained through 
Dewey & Co.'s Scientific Press American and 
Foreign Patent Agency, the following are 
worthy of special mention: 

An Improved Boot. — Thos. H. Buckingham, 
of San Francisco, Cal., assignor to Buckingham 
& Hecht, of same city. No. 280,443. Dated 
July 3, 18S3. This invention relates to a cer- 
tain new and useful improvement in boots, con- 
sisting in the fashioning of certain parts and 
their combination so as to form the upper and 
leg of the boot. The object of the invention is 
economy in cutting and simplicity in construc- 
tion, combined with strength and comfort. It 
is difficult to describe this invention without 
diagrams or illustrations. Suffice to say that 
in a boot made after this patent there is no side 
seam, either on the leg, or at the line where the 
counter joins the main piece. The latter seam 
is well known to be the first to give out, and 
its avoidance is a benefit, both because of this fact 
and also because of the greater comfort which 
it gives the wearer. 

. Extension Ladder and Truck. — Daniel W. 
Hoover, of Gas Point, Cal. No. '280,475. 
Dated July 3, 1883. This invention relates to 
a new and useful extension ladder and truck, 
the particular object of which is to provide a 
ready means for picking fruit, for pruning trees, 
or for any such or similar use. 'Its portability 
renders it peculiarly adapted to such work. The 
extension portion of the ladder is connected 
with the main portion by means of hinges, 
placed on the front sides, whereby such exten- 
sion may turn or fold down forward, but is 
limited in its upward movement by rinding a 
bearing for its sides on the sides of the main 
portion of the ladder, in which position it con- 
tinues the inclination of the main portion. The 
extension is properly secured by brace bolts, 
etc., so that a person can mount the extension 
with perfect safety. 

Gun Sight. — John C. Kelton,S. F.,Cal. No. 
280,484. Dated July 3, 1883. This invention 
relates to certain improvements in the rear sight 
of rifles generally, but ismoreparticularlyadapt- 
ed for use upon the United States Springfield 
rifle and carbine, as at present constructed, al- 
though it may also be used on other rifles. The 
object of the invention is to enable the sight to be 
more quickly and correctly adjusted, and also to 
provide a better lateral adjustment to counter- 
act the deflection caused by the wind. The in- 
vention consists of a base which is fixed to the 
barrel of the gun, a hinged leaf having side 
bars which fall outside the base, and a slide 
which has a movement only in the direction of 
the length of the bars. This slide carries the 
sight proper. The sight itself is, in form, the 
segment of a cylinder, with the notch extending 
around the curve centrally, so that its depth will 
be the same at all elevations. 

Feed Cup. — Edward J. Thomas, of Oakland, 
Cal. No. 280,532. Dated July 3, 1883. This 
invention relates to an improved feed-cup for 
bird cages, the object of which is to prevent the 
bird from scattering the seed or other contents of 
the cup upon the floor of the cage or elsewhere. 
This object is accomplished by the intervention 
of a lip or flange placed in the throat of the cup, 
whereby the seed is guarded from, being thrown 
out in front, while the bird is at the same time 
prevented from throwing the seed out with his 
bill. 

Safety Att \<n m i;vr 'run Railway Trains. — 
Samuel Brown, S. l'\, Cal. No. 280,442. This in- 
vention relates to a new and useful safety attach- 
ment for the cars and locomotive of a railway 
train, and consists of a peculiar clamp or guard, 



rigidly secured under the cars, and in a raised bar 
or rail, with which the clamp or guardis adapted 
to engage. The object of the invention is to 
prevent the derailment of a railroad train at 
sharp curves, or at other dangerous points, 
where, under speed, the wheels may have a 
tendency to leave the track. 

Seed Sower Attachment. — William T. Arm- 
strong, of Soledad, Cal., assignor to Baker & 
Hamilton, of San Francisco. No. 2S0,437. Da- 
ted July 3, 1883. This invention relates to an 
attachment for seed sowers, and is especially 
applicable to that class of implements in which 
the grain flows through an opening in the bot- 
tom of a containing hopper, and is spread by a 
horizontally rotating disk with distributing 
arms. It consists of one or more spirally curved 
arms, which are fixed to the top of a shaft 
which projects up through the opening in the 
bottom of the hopper, and which, by their pe- 
culiar shape and action, force the grain down 
in a regular current, which ensures its being 
sown evenly upon the ground. 

Inhaler. — Stephen A. Morse, San Francisco, 
Cal. No. 281,114. Dated July 10, 1883. In 
the usual articles of this class great care must 
be taken to avoid blowing through the mouth 
tube, as this forces the liquid in the bottle up 
into the acid chamber and destroys the arrange- 
ment and effect of the ingredients. Mr. Morse 
overcame this difficulty by the use of a neat 
and effective valve which prevents the liquid 
from rising into the acid chamber when the 
tube is blown into, but allows the perfect ef- 
fect of inhalation. 

Masonic Emblem, — David W. Laird, of S. F. 
No. 14,025. This is a new and original design 
for a Masonic emblem or jewel, consisting of a 
Maltese cross, in the central portion of which 
is a shield bearing the coat of arms of the State 
of California. Upon the outer edge of the arms 
of the cross any suitable words may be engraven. 
The cross is suspended by a link from a bar 
which supports the figure of a grizzly bear. 
The design is both beautiful and appropriate. 

News in Brief. 

The Canadian hop crop promises to be very 
poor. 

James Robinson committed suicide at Salt 
Lake. 

The yellow fever is raging at Callao and 
Lima. 

A STRANGE and fatal horse disease lias broken 
out in Utah. 

A GERMAN paper will be established in the 
city of Mexico. 

There are 300 bridges on the line nf the Utah 
& Northern railroad. 

The relations between Prussia and the Vati- 
can are still strained. 

The President of Chili advises the separation 
of Church and State. 

Mrs. Nancy Adair dislocated her neck and 
fell dead while addressing a prayer meeting in 
the Cherokee nation. 

Along the line of the Mexican Central rail- 
road there are twenty-one cities, with an ag- 
gregate population of 800,000, and none of 
them are State capitals. 

A Chinaman caught a sturgeon weighing 
100 pounds, in Feather river, below Oroville, 
last week. The fish pulled him overboard, but 
he was rescued by his comrades. 

A SQUAW was killed by her buck in Butte 
valley, White Pine county, Nev., a few days 
ago, and her murderer was hitched to a horse 
by members of the tribe and "snaked" to 
death. 

Auk yon troubled with such symptoms of dyspepsia as 
belching, touting of the food, heart-burn, ute,? Brown's 
Iron Bitters will cure you. 



Seigler Springs. 

These Springs ure situated about seven miles from 
Lower 1 -ake, Lake county, and are reached in twelve 
hours from San Francisco, via Calistoga. The 
Springs include soda, iron, magnesia, sulphur, 
arsenic, etc., and have been well tested for a variety 
of diseases, and their curative properties recom- 
mend them to the afflicted. Situated in a beau- 
tiful and healthy location, the number of visitors 
to the place has been steadily increasing, and a fine 
large hotel has been erected this summer to meet the 
requirements of increasing patronage. A large 
swimming bath is one of the attractions of the place, 
and Mr. 1*'. J. McCullough, the proprietor, spares no 
pains to accommodate those who pay the Springs a 
visit. The tabic is supplied with the best articles ob- 
tainable. Those contemplating visiting the springs, 
either for health or pleasure, will do well in giving 
Seigler Springs a visit. 



Our Agents. 

Our, Friends can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend to send none 
but worthy men, 

G. W. McGukw— Santa Clara county. 

M. P. Owen— Santa Cruz county. 

J. W. A. Wright— Merced, Tulare and Kern comities. 

Jarkd C. Hoao — California. 

B. W. Ckowkll — Arizona Territory 

M. li. Joseph— Eureka, Nev. 

I. M. Leiiiy— Los Angeles, San Bernardino and flan 
Diego counties. 

A. C. Knox — Oregon and Washington Tcr. 

J. J. Bartell — Yolo county. 



SEEK 



health and avoid sickness. 
Instead of feeling tired and 
worn out, instead of aches 
and pains, wouldn't you 
rather feel fresh and strong? 

You can continue feeling 
miserable and good for no- 
thing, and no one but your- 
self can find fault, but if you 
are tired of that kind of life, 
you can change it if you 
choose. 

How ? By getting one 
bottle of Brown' Iron Bit- 
ters, and taking it regularly 
according to directions. 



Mansfield, Ohio, Nov. 26, 1881. 

Gentlemen : — I have suffered with 
pain in my side and back, and great 
soreness on my breast, with shoot- 
ing pains all through my body, at- 
tended with great weakness, depres- 
sion of spirits, and loss of appe- 
tite. I have taken several different 
medicines, and was treated by prom- 
inent physicians for my liver, kid- 
neys, and spleen, but I got no relief. 
I thought I would try Brown's Iron 
Bitters ; I have now taken one bottle 
and a half and am about well — pain 
in side and back all gone — soreness 
all out of my breast, and I have a 
good appetite, and am gaining in 
strength and flesh. Itcan justlybe 
called the king of medicines. 

John K.Allenobr. 



Brown's Iron Bitters is 
composed of Iron in soluble 
form ; Cinchona the great 
tonic, together with other 
standard remedies, making 
a remarkable non-alcoholic 
tonic, which will cure Dys- 
pepsia, Indigestion, Malaria, 
Weakness, and relieve all 
Lung and Kidney diseases. 



The Home School for Young Ladies 

OAKLAND. CAL. 

The Home School, which has hitherto been under the 
management of Mis* II. X, field, now deceased, will be 
re-opened on the 25th pint, under the personal supervis- 
ion and care of Miss Lucy A. Field and Miss Caroline II. 
Field, her sisters. The Misses Field, who now as- 
sume control," were formerly connected with this 
school for four years ending September, 1877, 
and have also had large experience as teachers 
of young ladies in the East. They assure its former 
friends and patrons and the public, that no effort 
or expense will be spared to maintain the high reputation 
which this school has attained. The best teachers in all 
branches will be provided, and every care and attention 
bestowed upon the physical, mental and moral welfare of 
those committed to their charge. Terms for boarders 
and day pupils as heretofore. Further information may 
be had by letter or personal application at the school, 
1825 Telegraph avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society, 

For the half year ending June 30, 1SS3, the Board of 
Directors of the GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SO 
CIETY has declared a dividend on Term Deposits at the 
rate of four and thirty-two one-huudredths (4 32-100) per 
cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of 
three and six-tenths (3 0-10) per cent per annum, free from 
Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 2d dav of 
July, 1S83. By order, 

GEO. LETTE, Secretary 



Complimentary samples of this paper are 
occasionally sent to parties connected with 'the 
interests specially represented in its columns. 
Persons so receiving copies are requested to 
examine its contents, terms of subscription, and 
give it their own patronage, and, as far as 
practicable, aid in circulating the journal, and 
making its value more widely known to others, 
and extending its influence in the cause it faith- 
fully serves. Subscription rate, §4 a year, in 
advance. Extra copies mailed for 10 cents, if 
ordered soon enough. Personal attention will 
be called to this (as well as other notices, at 
times,) by turning a leaf. 

Important additions are being continually made in 
Woodward's Gardens. The grotto walled with aquaria is 
constantly receivi ig accessions of new fish and other marine 
life. The number of sea lions is increased, and there is a 
better chance to study their actions The pavilion has new 
varieties of performances The floral department is replete, 
and the wild animals in good vigor. A day at Woodward's 
Gardens is a day well spent. 



I Cofiipapieg, 

Persons interested in incorporations will 
do well to recommend the publication of 
the official notices of their companies in 
this paper, as the cheapest appiopriate 
mediu m for advertising. 

Seaton Gold Mining Company.— Location 

of principal place of business, San Francisco, California. 

Location of works, Drytown, Amador county, California. 

NOTICE.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of Assessment No. 2, levied 
April 10, 1983, the several amounts set opposite the named 
of the respective shareholders, as follows: 

No No 

Names. Certificate. Shares. Amount. 

Scott, E A 4 10 % 75 

Warner, Alex 5 10 75 

Martin, A, Trustee 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 7 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 8 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee !) 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee lo 1,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 11 1,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 12 1,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 13 1,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 14 l,00u 75 uu 

Martin, A, Trustee 15 V.U00 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 10 1,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 17 1,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trnstee IS 1 ,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 19 3,000 75 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 20 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee. ... ., 21 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 22 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 23 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 24 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 25 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 20 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 27 50O 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 28 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 2!) 500 37 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 30 4,000 300 00 

Martin, A, Trnstee 31 900 67 50 

Davis, John A "32 90 6 75 

Martin, A, Trustee 33 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 34 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 35 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 3(1 4,900 307 50 

Kellogg, C W 37 100 7 50 

Martin, A, Trustee 38 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 39 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 40 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 41 5,000 37500 

Martin, A, Trustee 42 5,000 375 00 

Martin, A, Trustee 43 10,000 750 00 

Fischer, Bertha C 45 100 7 50 

Cornwall, 1' B 40 4,800 366 75 

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board 
of Directors, niiule on the 10th day of April, 1883, so many 
shares of each parcel of said stock as may be necessary, 
will be sold at public auction, at 528 California St., Room 
6, San Francisco, Cal., on TUESDAY, the 5th day of June, 
1883, at the hour of 1 o'clock p, \i. of said day, to pay said 
delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

A. MARTIN, Secretary. 

OFFICE— Room 6, 528 California St., San Francisco, 
California. 



POSTPONEMENT. 

The above sale of delinquent stock is hereby postponed 
to THURSDAY, the 28th day of June, 1883, at 1 o'clock 
l'. M., at the same place. By order of the Board of Di- 
rectors, A. MARTIN, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 6, 1883. 

The above sale of delinquent stock is hereby postponed 
to THURSDAY, July 26, 1883, at 1 o'clock p. M., at the 
same place. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. MARTIN, Secretary, 

San Francisco, June 28, 1883. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICIO OF TDK 

Standard Consolidated Mining Company. 

San Francisco, July 2, 1883. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above 
named company held this day, Dividend No, 50, of twenty- 
five cents (25c.) per share, was declared, payable THURS- 
DAY, July 12, 1883, at the Farmers' Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, in New York, or at the office in this city. 

WILLIAM WILLIS, Secretary. 
OFFICE— Room No. 29, Nevada block, No. 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF THE 

Bulwer Consolidated Mining Company. 

San Francisco, June 21, 18S3. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above 
named company, held this day, Dividend No. 18, of fifteen 
cents (15c.) per share, was declared, payable on Monday, 
July 2, 1883. Transfer books closed on Saturday, June 23, 
1883, at 12 o'clock M. This dividend is payable at the 
Fanners' Loan and Trust Colnpany in New York, on all 
stock issued there, and at the office in this city on all 
stock issued here. WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 

OFFICE— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 30D .Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould and Curry Silver Mining Company. 

ASSESSMENT No. 45. 

Levied .Tune 15, 1SS3 

Delinquent Inly 20, 1883 

Day of Sale August 13, 1883 

Amount Fifty cents per share. 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
OFFlOK— Room No. 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Bound Volume of the Press.— We have a few sets of 
the back files of the Mining and Scientific Press which 
we will sell for *3 per (half yearly) volume. In cloth and 
leather binding, Hi. These volumes, complete, are scarce, 
and valuable for future reference and library use. 



? 






julv 21, 1883] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



"Challenge" Ore Feeders. 

OVER 1100 HAVE BEEN IN SUCCESSFUL OPERATION. 
Awarded First Premiums at the Preceding and last Industrial Fairs of the Mechanics' Institute of San Francisco. 

TWENTY PER CENT. MORE ORE CRUSHED WITH FIFTEEN PER CENT. LESS WEAR OF IRON 



THAN BY THE OLD METHOD OF HAND-FEEDING. 



The opiK>8itt) cu«. illU'lrmlrft I'ne rec*nllv tntrodOMd 
(i.ip an . bDnu£ U'JUMincnt, wblch replaces the Weijf.it 
originally iso-' and result <n an itb. iou .. .iiipr. . 

Tlit pnclfa»l operation of tb« Iwro number il thi ■ 
machines now in u> o demotmtntKi (he fan V *t the 
principle uuoo which a pyifect Ore Feeder a tut be con 
■iructerl ii that uf a '-nri-iVr and not that of a it 
lablf. Uniform fe«-oi g Is no i* b- ble upon (bo mllu 
plan. Tue ore mutt be rrtiilii >-arrif>i upon aateadi'.,- 
advanclng pl»/e or labia '.o the liue or point ofdlfchanre, 
and ti ere tie umnly dropped. Jerky or ipasmodically 
acting OOPtdTftDOM will not answer the pirpoae (or ftv.d- 
ioc wet or sticky cr\»a, nor for (be ores of tnioca wcere 
tiivy may change from sharp ipiart/. to an latennlzad ma- 
terial of i|oai U and ea' thy matlor. 

1'nee Feeders are In Successful Practica 

Operation In the >ollowmtr Quartz 

Milli, and are giving Perfect 

Sattb faction to their 

Mai agora 

10 EM mr.s Warlposa county, C»l. 

TuoIumi>B " " 



fVmproirita.. 

Sou Is by 

PatUrton 30 

Sheep Ranch 20 

Mahoney ... , i" 

/.slle i" 

Pacific 10 

Naahviilt- 

Gross »0 

20 

Si Patr'tk IS 

|«ooe 10 

Emoi-e 20 

Idaho :«) 

Green Mountain. '"J 

Plumas-Eureka.. . « . ■ > 

Bu liver- Standard. BO 
Standard 
Noonda. . 



Calaveras 
Ama or 



'10 
, SO 
Bit Dry Creek ... 10 

Mexican 

Santiago 

Vivlaa 

Christy 

Contention.. 
Grand Central. . 

Snnebine , 

liomtstake . 
Father de Smot. . 
Hidden Treasure 
Highland 



44 

88 
IB 
5 
20 
20 
20 
2i - 1 
so 
40 
.120 



El Dondo " " 

Placer " " 

.NovatL* " " 

. PIUOUIB " 

Bodi°, Mono, " 

..Fresno " " 

, .Lyon county, Nevada. 



. .U'itab, county, Utah. 
. .Tombstone, Arizona. 

..Black HillR, Dakota. 




And In many other Mills in tbo Mining Districts of the eu- 
•ire United States, and as well in Nova 8cotia and Aus- 
tralasia. The superiority of those Feeders over others 
manufa tuicd has been so thoroughly demoo8tra:ed that it 
is not deemed pertluent to cite the nombcrleas instances 
of this f ict. 

Manufactured and for Sale by 

THE "JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS," 

Nos. 49 and 51 Fremont Street, San Francisco, Cal., 

Manufacturers of Quartz, Saw Mill and General Machinery. Agents for "BAKER" ROTARY PRESSURE BLOWERS, WILHI; \ 
HAM ROTARY PISTON TUMI'S, P. BI.AISDKLL & CO.'S MACHINISTS* TOOLS, and the Celebrated "HOT POLISHED SHAFT- 
IXC." frum the Akmn Iron Company, Akron, Ohio. Also Manufacturers of New and Dealers in Second-Hand Boilers, Engines and all 
Descriptions of Machinery. 

■"CATALOGUE AND PARTICULARS FURNISHED UPON APPLICATION. *» 



MINING^MACHINERY 

INCLUDINC 

Steel Water Jacket Smelting Furnace, 

tjuartz Mills, Concentration Works, Hoisting Apparatus, and all classes of 
Machinery employed in Mining and Reduction of Ores. 

PORTABLE AND STATIONARY 

STEAM ENGINES 

From Ten to Two Hundred Horse Power, Steam Boilers of any stylo mid Capacity. 

SLA/OT JJUEIXjiIliiS 

Adapter! to wants of the Planter, Minor, or for the rrmnufneturr of Merchant Lumber, 
Prices ™ ,ng from 



$200 

rom 2,000 to 50,000 Feet per day. s 
;s for 'the Transmission of Power. 

LANE & BODLEYXO., Cincinnati, 



i pwards, and of Capacity from 2,000 to 50,000 Feet per day Shafting*, Hangers, Pulleys, 
Gearing, and all Appliances for the Transmission of Power. 



TJE'V\7"EI"5r <5c CO.'S 



Scientific Press 




Patent Igntf . 






rESTABLISHED 18SO.I 
Inventors on the Paolfio Coast wiH find it greatly to their advantage to oonsnlt this old 
experienced, first-class Agenoy. We have able and trustworthy associates and Agents in Wash. 
ington and the capital cities of the principal nations of the world. In "connection with our edi- 
torial, scientific and Patent Law Library, and record of original eases in our office, we have 
other advantages far beyond those which oan be offered home inventors by other Agencies. The 
Information accumulated through long and careful practice before the Office, and the frequent 
examination of Patents already granted, for the purpose of determining the patentability of 
iaventions" brought before us, enables us often to give advice which will save inventors the 
expense of applying for Patents npon inventions which are not new. Circulars of advice scot 
free on receipt of postage. Address DEWEY & CO., Patent Agents, 252 Market St., S. F, 

A, T. DEWKT, W. B. BWKB, GEO. F. 8TKONO. 



(9. 



Fig-.l 



o a tent Elastic i73 , 
*£?5539sSli 



A sample File- M 
.£; holder sent post jj= 
paid, from this r I 
office on receipt 




This is the best durable Ale-holder 
in use. Send for sample, or further 
information, to this office- 



UNITED STATES 

Submarine Monitor 

230 Montgomery Street, Room 20, 

SAX FRANCISCO. 

WM. H. MILLIKEN, Engineer. 



$5j Plansare on exhibition ami stock ready for issue. 
Any information that is desired can be furnished at th 
office as above. 



Don't Forget the Stamp, — Always lake a last look 
;>.• a letter before posting to see that the stamp is in place 
Recently one of our agents in Los Angeles county found a 
letter containing S3 for one year's subscription to our paper. 
held for postage which the writer no doub Ithought he had 
duly stamped, and but for the incidental finding of it by 
our agent, would of course have supposed we had received 
the money st the proper time. Let all subscribers when 
remitting or ordering their paper stopped be sure they duly 
stamp their letters. 



Educational. 



St. Augustine College, 

BEN1CIA, CAT.,. 

'1 htrty-flrst Term Opens 
Tl'iiSDAV JULY 31. 16831, 

At a 

RT. RKV. .1 II. D. W1NGFIKLD, D. »., IX D , 
President. 



/ST. 



2\ 



MARY'S HALL 

BENICIA, CAL. 
THE IISTE^Er TEEM 

SEMINARY FOR YOUNG LADIES 

W Itli full graduating coi r -. »nd di partirn nte 

-"'f Modem ■ i, Music and 

Art, »iii comnn uci "ii 

Thursday August 3, 1883. 

ISTFori . .ii, full particulai -, 01 

1 'i ■ | " idai 

RlV, 1. DELOfi M iNsi l| "i.Ti, A. M.. 
Rei ron. 



W, E. Cp\mbbruain, Jr. 



T. A. Kopinsos 




LIFE SCHOLARSHIPS, $70. 

Paid in Installments, $75. 
iySpnd fjr c'rcolirs. 



THE HARMON SEMINARY, 

Berkeley, Cal. 

A FIRST-CLASS BOARDING SCHOOL 

FOR YOUNG LADIES. 

For Catalogues nr other information, address ti S 
HARMON, Berkeley, Cal., or K. J. Wicksox, 4ii Clay 
Street San Francisco. 



THE HOME SCHOOL 

FOB 

YOTJITG LADIES, 

1825 Telegraph Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 

Organized in 1S7S. , 
The next Year begins on WEDNESDAY, .MXY 25, 1888 

MISS L. A. FIELD, Principal. 



SACKETT 

(FOR BOYS) 

SCHOOL. 



Takes first rank for thoroughness 

and ability of its leuchers; albO 

for home care. 

Business, Classical, audi 
English. Department*. 

Next Term commences July 16th 
Send for Catao^ue to 

D. P. SACKETT, A. M., Principal, 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

LAUREL HALL. " 

Hone School for YoiiiLafe and Children. 

The Twentieth Annual Session will commence Thurs- 
day, August 2, 1883. 

This Institution offers to a limited number advantages 
of the highest order, having a large corps of well-knuwn 
teachers wlio cive individual care and treatment to each 
pupil. Address MRS. L. MANSON-BUCKMASTER, 
Sau Mateo, Cal. 



IRVING INSTITUTE. 

YOUNG LADIES' '.BOARDING SCHOOL. 

103C Va'enc a St., San Francisco. 

Tbe building haj been enlarged and refitted. The next 
Eossiou will commence July 23d. For catalogue, address 

REV. EDWARD B. CHUKCII, A.M., 
Principal, 



THE HOME SEMINARY, 

San Jose, ----- California. 

Incorporated iSSr. 

FOR YOUNG LADIES AND MISSES. 

Next Term begins August 15, 1833. 



For Particulars and Terina of Tuition, Address 
MISS M. S. CASTLEMAN, Principal. 

WM. BREDEMEYER, 

Mining, Consulting and Civil Engineer, 

in SECOND MOUTH STREET. VNlTiCD 

"xO status .Mineral Surveyor for Utah and Idaho. No- 
tary Public. Keologk-al Kxanii nations, Reports on Mining 
Properties, Surveys Mines, Railroads and Canals., and Su- 
perintends the workings of the same. Prepares Estimates 
and Plans for Opening and Working .Mines, Expert on 
Mining Questions berfore the Courts, Address I'. 0. hu. 
1157, Salt Lake City, Utah. 



46 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jdly 21, 1883 



Iron and jVlachine hh 



F. P. Bacon, Prea. C. L. Foutk, Sec'y. 

The Globe Ironworks Co., 

Manufacturers and Repairs of all kinds of 

MACHINERY AND IRON CASTINGS, 

AND BUILDBFS OF 

Locomotives, Hoisting aM Mining MacMnery. Port- 
aWe, stationery ani Marine Engines. 

Office and Worts— 222 and 224 Fremont St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
*3TAgent9 lor C. H. Baker's Mining Horse Power; 
Bithop'a Mining Pump Apparatus; C. H. Baker's Quick- 
silver Feeder. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO, OAL. 
ROOT, NIELSON & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STEAM ENGINES, BOILERS AND ALL 
Kinds of Machinery for Mining Purposes. 

Flouring Mills, Saw Mills and Quartz Mills Machinery 
constructed, fitted up and repaired. 

Front Street, Between N and O Streets, 

8A0RAMBNTO, OAL. 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works, 

Manufacture Iron Castings and Machinery 
of all Kinds at Greatly Reduced Bates. 

STEVENSON'S PATENT 

Mold-Board AMALGAMATORS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

First St., between Howard & Folsom, S. F. 



California Brass Foundry, 

No. 125 First Street, Opposite Minna. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

All klnda of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt 
Metal Castings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes, 
Sheathing Nails. Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steam- 
boat Bells and Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks 
and Valves, Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Coup- 
lings and Connections of all sizes and patterns, furnished 
with dispatch. ^.PRICES MODERATE. ^* 

J. H. WEED. V. KINGWELL. 



California Machine Works, 

wnx. H. BIRCH, 

Engineer and Machinist, 

119 Beale Street, San Francisco. 

Portable and Double Sawmills, Steam Engines, Flour, 

Quartz and Mining Machinery. Brodie's Patent Rock Crusher 

PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

No 1 Crusher, 4 tons per hour S450.00 

•• 2 " 6 " " " 625.00 

•• 3 " 3 " " " 925.00 

" " 15001bs " " 150.00 

The Best Crusher in the Market and at the Lowest Price3. 
Power, Hydraulic Ram or Cylinder Elevators, Hand Power 
Hoists, for sidewalks any purpose, Saw Arbor3 and Mill 
Fittings. Repairing promptly attended to 

STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

Of all sizes— from 2 to 60-Horse power. Also, Quartz 
Mills, Mining Pumps, Hoisting Machinery, Shafting, Iron 
T*mks, etc. For sale at the lowest prices by 

J. HENDY, 49 and 51 Fremont Street, 3. F. 

THOMAS THOMPSON. THORNTON THOMPSON. 

THOMPSON BROTHERS, 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

and 131 Beale St., between Mission and Howard, S. F. 

MANtTFACTURBRS OF CASTINGS OF BVBRY BBSORIPTION. 



COKE. PATENT. COKE. 

o 

This COKE is exclusively used by Prof. Thomas Price, in his assay office, by the Selby 
Smelting and Lead Co., Prescott, Scott & Co., Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works and others in 
this city. Large supplies are regularly forwarded to consumers in Salt Lake and Nevada, to the 
Copper Queen Mining Co., Longfellow Copper Mining Co. and other consumers in Arizona. 

The undersigned are in receipt of regular supplies from Cardiff, Wales, and offer the COKE 
for sale in quantities to suit purchasers. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

316 California St., San Francisco. 



SILVER MEDAL AWARDED 

—AT— 

Mechanics' Fair, 1882, 

— FOR— 

Best Upright Engine and Boiler com- 
bined, Best Hoisting Engine and Boiler 
combined and BfiBt Upright Engine in 
motion to 

W. H. OH MEN," j0P* 

Engine Worts.. l||§s|§ 

109 & 111 Beale St. jj^§- 
SA.N FRANCISCO. iG WBft s 




Berry & Place Machine Co. 

/ PARKE <Se LACY. Proprietors. 



No. S California Street, 

San Francisco, 

CAL. 

Importers and Dealers in every 
Variety of 




GARDNER 
GOVERNOR 



Wood and Iron Working Machinery, 



STEAM PUMPS, 



Stationary. Portable and Hoisting Engines and Boilers 
Sawmills. Shingle Mills, Emery Wheels and Grind- 
ers. Gardner Governors, Planer Knives, Sand 
Paper in Rolls, together with a general line 
of Mining and Mill Supplies, includ- 
p 7 ing Leather Belting, RuuberBelt- 

ing Packing and Hose. 
iar Catalogues furnished on Application. Jg$ 



Geo. W. Pkkscott, President. 
Irving M, Scott, Gen'l Manager. 



H. T. Scott, Vicc-Pres't and Treas. 



Gko. W. Dickik, Manager- 
.1. O'B. Gl'NN, Secretary. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Office, 61 First St. | Cor. First & Mission Sis., S. F. | p. o. Box 2128. 



BUILDERS OF 



STEAM, AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Agents of the Cameron Steam Pump. 

Home Industry.— All Work Tested and Guaranteed. 



Vertical Engines, 


Baby Hoists, 


Stamps.', 


Horizontal Engines, 


Ventilating Fans, 


Pans, 


Automatic Cut-off Engines, 


Rock Breakers, 


Settlers, 


Compoond Condensing Engines, 


Self-Feeders, 


Retorts 


Shafting, 


Pulleys, 


Etc., Etc. 



TRY OUR MAKE, CHEAPEST AND BEST IN USE. 

UNION IRON WORKS, 



Sem> cob LatbUirculahs. 



iSSl's to PRESCOTT, SCOTT & CC 



Skxd fob Latk Circulars. 



L. C. MARSHUTZ. 



T. Q. CANTRELL 



National Iron Works, 

Northwest Cor. Main and. Howard Sts., San Francisco, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES 

At Greatly Reduced Prices. 

HOME INDUSTRY ! ALL WORE TESTED AND GUARANTEED ! 

Stationary and Compound Engines, Flour, Sugar, Quartz and Saw Mills. Anmlga 

luatlng Machines. 
CASTINGS AND FORGINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION- 

Sole Manufacturers of Kendall's Patent Ouartz Mills. 



Pacific Rolling Mill Co., 



SAN 
RAILROAD 



FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

AND MERCHANT IRON, 



ROLLED BEAMS, ANGLE, CHANNEL AND J IRON, BRIDGE AND MACHINE BOLTS, LAG SCREWS, NUTS 
WASHERS, ETC., STEAMBOAT SHAFTS, CRANKS, PISTONS, CONNECTING RODS, ETC., ETC. 

Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Hammered Iron of Every Description. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON 

W Orders Solicited and Promptly Executed. 

Office. No. SO& Market St.. UNION BlOCK. 




Cheap Ore Pulverizer. 



There is for Bale in thig city, by I. A. Heald, American 
Machine and Model WorkB, 111 and 113 First St., a 
Rutherford Pulverizer, an improved revolving barrel 
crusher, which was only used a f ew times and is as good 
a3 new. It will be sold very much below cost, and 
miners who are in need of such an appliance for a small 
mine will do well to make in quiries concerning it. It is 
suitable for a pulverizing mill for powder or other sub- 
stances. Reference aa to above can be had upon applying 
lo this office 



Reliance Machine Works, 

CLOT & MEESE, 

Sole Licensed Manufacturers of the 

Medart Patent Wrought Rim Pulley 

For the S^-ates of California, Oregon and Nevada, and tho Territories of Idaho, Washington, 

Mo.itana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizoaa. Lightest, Strongest, Cheapest and 

Best Balanced Pulley in the World. Also Manufacturers of 

SHAFTING, HANGERS AND APPURTENANCES. 

jHrSKND for Circular and Prick List. TBJ; 
Nos. 129 and 13 1 Fremont Street, ... san FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Don't Fall to Write. 

Should this paper be received by any subscriber who 
does not want it, or beyond the tune they intend to pay 
for it, let them not fail to write us direct, to stop it. A 
postal cant (costing one cent only) will suffice. We 
will not knowingly send the paper to anyone who does 
not wish it, hut if it is continued, through the failure of 
the subscriber to notify us to discontinue it, or some 
irresponsible party requested to stop it, wo shall positively 
demand payment for the time it is sent. 



Inventors vMu irser. 

25S Market St., N. E. cor. Front, up-afcairs, San t'ra Cisco 
Experimental machinery ftnd all kiuds of models, tin, cop- 
per and bra33 work 




Corner Beale and Howard Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



W. H TAYLOR, Pres't. 



JOSEPH MOORE, Sup'l 



Dewey & Co. { Ma ^ 3t .} Patent Agt's. 



Builders of Steam Machinery 

IN ALL ITS BRANOHBfl, 

Steamboat, Steamship, Land 

Engines and Boilers, 

HIGH PRESSURE OR COMPOUND. 



STEAM VESSELS, of all kludfl, built complete with 
Hulls of Wood, Iron or Composite. 

ORDINARY ENGINES compounded when ad- 
visable. 

STEAM LAUNCHES, Barges and Steam Tuga con- 
structed with reference to the Trade in which they are 
to be employed. Speed, tonnage and draft of water 
guaranteed. 

STEAM BOILERS. Particular attention given to 
the quality of the material and workmanship, andlnone 
but first-class work produced. 

SUGAR MILLS AND SUGAR-MAKING 
MACHINERY made after the most approved plans 
Also, all Boiler Iron Work connected therewith, 

WATER PIPE, of Boiler or Sheet Iron, of any size 
made in suitable lengths for connecting together, or 
sheets rolled, punched, and packed for shipment ready 
to be riveted on the ground. 

HYDRAULIC RIVETING. Boiler Work and 
Water Pipe made by this establishment, riveted by 
Hydraulic Riveting Machinery, that quality of work 
being far superior to hand work. 

SHIP WORK. Ship and Steam Capstans, Steam 
WincheB, Air and Circulating Pumps, made after the 
most approved plans. 

PUMPS. Direct Acting Pumps, for Irrigation or City 
Water Works purposes, built with the celebrated Davy 
Valve Motion, superior to any other Pump. 




1850. 1883. 

RANKIN, BRAYT0N & CO,, 

127 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 

BUILDERS OP 

MINING MACHINERY. 



Plants 'or Gold and Silver Mills, embracing the latss 
audmost improved machinery and processes for laseand 
free ores. Water Jacket Smelting Furnaces for cii/er. 
lead and copper ores, with new and important improve- 
m nts, superior to any other make. Hoisting Worky, 
Pumping Machinery, Chloridizing Furnaces, etc. Wh 
offer our customers the best results of thirty years' expe- 
rience in this special line of work, and are prepared 'o 
furnish the moBt approved character of Mining and Re- 
duction Machinery, superior in design and construction 
to that of any other make, at the lowest possible prices. 
We also contract to d eliver, in complete running order, 
Mills, Furnaces, Hoisting Works, etc., in any of the 
Mining States and Territories. Estimates given on an- 
plication. Send for illustrated circular. 



WATER TANKS. 




Over 700 of our welt-known Water Tanks put in service 
last year. These tanks are mad o by machinery, from the 
best of materials, and shipped to all parts of the country 
Each piece numbered. No skill required in setting up. 

WELLS, RUSSELL & CO., 

MECHANICS' MILLS. 
Cor. Mission & Frerront Ste., San Prancieco 



Mining Books. 



Orders for Mining and Scientific Books in funeral will 
be supplied through this office at published rates. 



Jolt 21, 1883] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 




Machinery Depot, 



2 1 and 23 Fremont Street. S. F. 



NO. 7 IMPROVED 



AIR COMPRESSOR, 



With Adtuatable Cut-off Poppet Valve Engine, and Forced Iron Crank SnaftB. 



SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

Absolute certainty in the action of the valves at any speed. Perfoot delivery of the air at any 
speed ur pressure. The heating of the air entirely prevented at any pressure. Takes less water to 
oool the air than any other Compressor. 

Power applied to the host advantage. Access obtainable to all the valves by removing air chest 
covjrs. Kntiro absence of springs or friction to open or shut the valves. No valve stems to break 
and drop insidoof cylinders. 

Have no back or front heads to break. The only Machine that makes a perfect diagram. No 
expensive foundations required. Absolute economy in first cost and after working. 

DISPLACEMENTS in air cylinder perfect. Showing less lcakago and friction than our competitors 
and a superior economy of about 20 per cent. 

Small Sizes made in Sections not to Exceed 300 lbs. 




H. P. GREGORY & CO., 



Importers and 



The Kortlne's Injector Is the simplest, 
cheapost and beat in use. Will draft its 
own water, hot or cold, and feed under 
varying pressure. Send for Circular. 



Nos 



Dealers in Machinery 
2 and 4 California Street, S, 



and Supplies. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 




J. A. Fay & Co., Wood Work- 
lng Machinery. 

Bement & Son's Machinists 
Tools. 

Blake's Steam Pumps, 

Perry's Centrifugal Pumps. 

Gould's Hand & Power Pumps 

Perrin's Band Saw Blades. 

Payne's Vertical and Horizontal 
Steam Engines. 

Williamson Bros. Hoisting En- 
gines. 

New Haven Machine Co. 's Ma- 
chinists' Tools. 

Otto Silent Gas Engines. 




Hoisting Engines of all Kinds. 



F. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

Sturtevant'B Blowers and Ex- 
hausts. 
Judson's Steam Governors. 
Pickering's Steam Governors. 
Tanite Co. Emery Wheels. 
Nathan & Dreyfus' Oilers. 
Korting's Injectors and Ejec- 
tors. 
DisBton's Circular Saws. 
Frank & Co.'s Wood Working 
Machinery. 
New York Belting & Packing 
Co.'s Rubber Belting, Hose, 
Packing, etc. 
Ballard's Oak Tanned Leather 
Belting, 




BLAKE STEAM PUMP. 
More Than 16,000 In Use. 





THE CONSUMERS' COMPANY. 

VULCAN B B, 

Blacli. G-lazed. I*ox7irca.or, 

Iu kegs and cases. The Beat Low Grade Explosivo in tbe market. Contains do Nitro 
Glycerine. Superior to JudBon or any Elack Powder made. 

Is Unequaled for Bank Blasting & Railroad Work. 
VULCAN NOS. I, 2 AND 3, 

r . *^>i The Strongest, Mot Uniform and best Nitro Glycerine Towder in ami factured, a*i 

rffiijjjjjjl which we are prepared to furnish at verj> lowest prices. 

Caps and Fuse of all Grades at Bottom Rates. 
VT7I.CAIT POWDEE CO., 

218 California St., San Francisco, 



STEEL 
CASTINGS 



FROM 1-4 TO 10,000 lbs. WEIGHT. 

True to pattern, sound and solid, of unequaled strength, toughness and 
durability. 

An invaluable substitute for forginga or cast-Iron requiring three-fold 
strength. 

Gearing of all kinds, Shoes, Dies, Hammerheads, Grossheads for Loco- 
motives, etc. 

16,000 Crank Shafts and 10,000 Gear Wheels of this Steel now running 
prove its superiority over other Steel Caatinga. 

ORANK SHAFTS, SHOES, DIES and GEARING specialties. 

Ciamlars and Price Lists free. Address 

CHESTER STEEL CASTING CO., 

WopUi. (HliSTEK. Pa. 407 Library St., PHILADELPHIA 



C. H. AARON, 

CONSULTINB AND PRACTICAL METALLURGIST, 

— AUTHOR OF 

"Testing and Working Silver Ores; Leaching Gold 
and Silver Ores." 

Mines Examined as to Practical Value 

Address, PINAL, ARIZONA. 



The Lemmon Herbarium. 

This Herbarium has been removed from the B'.ike 
Housoto a permanent place at 1205 Franklin St., near 
Fourteenth St., Oakland, one square east of the Pose 
Office, where plants of the Pacific Coast, imludir^ 
Arizona, may be determined on application, and instruc- 
tion given in botany during the winter, sets rr single 
specimens of the rare and new fcrna of the Pacific Coast 
for sale. 



JAS.LEFFEL'S TURBINE WATER WHEEL 

The "Old Reliable," 



^.■fr^ll *a\ 



With Important Improvements, makinc;|it the 

MOST PERFECT TURBINE NOW IN USE, 

Comprising the Largest and the Smallest Wheels, under botb the Highest and 
Lowest head used in this country. Our new Illustrated Ecok sent freB to those 
owning water power. 

Those improving water power should not fail to write us for New Prices, before 
\ buying olsewhere. New Shops and New Machinery are provided for makijg thla 
Wheel Address 

JAMBS LEFFEL <& CO., 

Springfield, Ohio, and 110 Liberty Street, New York City 
PARKE &; I.ACY. General Agents, 21 & 23 Fremont St.. S. I\ 





GOLP QUARTZ and PLACER MINERS' 

Silver Plated 

A.Ts/HJ^.J^G-A.lMLA.TTlX'G- PLATES, 

For Saving Gold. 
Every description of platos for Quartz Mills and Wet or Dry Placer Amalya 
mator Machines made to order, corrugated or plain. 

OVER 2,000 ORDERS FILLED. 
The most extensive and successful manufacturer of these plateB in the 
United States. Will fill orders for delivery in Rocky Mountain and Pacific 
Coast Mining States at lower prices than any other manufacturer. 

O'd Mining Plates Rcplated. Old Platos bought, o 
gold separated for low percentage of result. 
SEND FOR PRICE LIST. 

SAN FRANCISCO PLATING WORKS, 

653 & 655 Mission St., San Francieco, Gal. 
E. G. DENNISTON, Proprietor, 



4S 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jdly 21, 1883 



THE JOHNA.ROEBLING'SSONSCO., 



Manufacturers of 

WIRE ROPE and WIRE 

Of Every Description. 

For Eficiiiied Hpaei, Standing Whip Kigging, Suspension Bridges, Ferrieqj ioi MineB anCi ail Muda of 

Heavy HoiBting; for Sfcaya a?'d Guys ou Derricks, Cranes and Shears; Tor 

Tillers, Sawmills, Sash Cords, Lightning Co:».*.uctors, otc. 

Galv:''iL:ed rjid PUiii Telegraph Vi'iv. 





Agents for NEW JERSEY WIRE CLOTH CO., 



14 Drumm Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 



THE BUCK THORN BARBED l-'EKCE (Oae Piece Solid S'aeL) 



CS-SEND FOR CIRCUl-AR.-aa 



m- 

Ml 



-/"-' 



f M 



fl MX M 




HEP.COTjBS slaying the giants. 



HERCULES POWDER 

Dnrives its name from HbroULBB, the most famous hero of Greek Mythology, who was gifted with superhuman 

strength. On one occsision he slew several giants who opposed him, and with one blow 

uf his club broke a high mountain from summit to base. 



HERCULES POWDER will break more rock, is stronger, safer and better than any other 
Explosive in use, and is the only Nitro-Glycerine Powder chemically compounded to neutralise 
the poisonous fumes, notwithstanding bombastic and pretentious claims by others. 

No. 1 (XX) is the Strongest Explosive Known, 
No. 2 is superior to any powder of that grade 

PATENTED IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT OtFICE. 



THE CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Sporting, Cannon, Mining, Blasting and HEBCULES Powder. 

ORDERS RECEIVED FOR HERCULES CAPS AND FUSE. 



JOHN F. LOHSE, SECY. 



Office, No. 230 California Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 




EXCELSIOR BLASTING POWDER, 

Manufactured by the 

EXCELSIOR POWDER COMPANY. 

Thia is no new, patent, nou-explosive Safety Powder, but the Genuine 
Standard Nitro ■Glycerine Powder, as safe to use and handle as any other Nitro 
Glycerine Powder manufactured. The fumesanH erases, common in nitro-glycerine 
powders, are destroyed, and do not leave the miner w'th headache or nausea. 

The powder is put up in cartridges of any fize to sui;. the consumer, and is 
exploded in the sam« manne' as all other high explosives; that is, by means of 
cup and fuse, or by electricity. It is not claimed for this pov/der that it is a 
non-explosive, or safer than other ni«ro-ylycerine powder. All powder, and 
especially nitroglycerine powder, should bo handled carefully. The EXCEL- 
SIOR POWDER is as safe, and for strength far surpasses any other powder on 
the market. Add re. e all orders to 

EXCELSIOR POWDER 

Room 9, No. 3 California St., 



COMPANY. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



r 5 ^ 



Patented Oct. 11, 




3snET^i:ixr's 



CKLKDRATED 



FURNACE, 

Working uj. to 04 per cent of Fire Assay, 

using 2fl per cent less salt since 

commencing, about a 

year ago. 

^LICENSES FOR USE FOKJSALE.lSS 

Or Furnaces Constructed. 

Address, 

R. A. NEVIN. Patentee, 

(Box 8301.) San Francisco, Cal. 



$1,000 CHALLENGE! 




THE FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR, 

-OR- 

VANNING MACHINS. 

Over 400 are now n use, giving entire satisfaction. Saves from 40 to 100 per cent, more than any other Con- 
centrator in use, and concentration are clean from the first working. The wear and tear are merely nominal. 

A machine can be seen *n working order, and ready to make testa, at the office ol Hinckley, Spiers & Hayes, 220 
Fremont Street. 

To those Intending to manufacture or purchase the so-called "Triumph" Concen- 
trator, we herewith state: 

That lezal advice has been given that all shaking m-otion applied to an endless traveling belt used for concen- 
tration of or«8 is an infringement on patents held and owned by the Frue Vanning Machine Company. 

Hint suit has been commenced in New York against an end-shake machine similar to the Triumph, and that as 
soon as decision is reached in the courts there, proceedings will he taken agai nst all Western Dfrinerements. 

That the patent laws make users of infringements responsible as well as milkers, and the public is therefore 
warned that there is considerable risk in purchasing any end-shake machine until our various patents have been 
decided. 

That if there are those who for any reason prefer an end-shake machine, we can manufacture and sell to such a 
machine of that description, as efficient as the Triumph, and at a lower price, and no liability for infringement will 
then be incurred by the purchaser. 

That we shall protect ourselves against any one miking, selling or using any machino infringing anv o! oik 
patents. Patented July 9, 1867; May 4, 1869; Dec. 22, 1874; Sept. 2, 1879; April 27, 1880. Patents applied for 

That we are, and have been, ready at any time, to make a competitive trial against the Triumph, or any other 
machine, for stakes of ?1,000. 

ADAMS & CARTER, Agents Frue Vanning Machine Company, 



Room 7, 109 California Street, 
Nov. 6, 1282. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



L. M, STARK. 



/ETNA IRON WORKS 



II. MAI.TIIK. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

IRON CASTINGS AND MACHINERY 

of all Kinds. 

MARINE, STEAM, AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Mining Machinery a Specialty. 

217, 219, and 221 FREMONT ST., - SAN FRANCISCO. 

MALTBB, LIND Sc CO.. Agents, 189 Broadway, New York. 



"W^illiam Hawkins. 

(SUCCESSOR TO HAWKINS & CANTRELL). 

MACHIlsTE "WOIRIECS 

210 and 212 Beale Street, bet. Howard and Folsom Sts., - - San Francisco. 

Manufacturer of 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES, 

FOR MmiNG AND OTHER PURPOSES. 

AJso of the HAWKINS' PATENT ELEVATOR HOIST, lor Hotels, Warehouses 
and Public Buildings. 

Steam Engines and all Kinds of Mill and Mining Machinery. 



ATLASK 

— 5P— ^.INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. 

npS STEAM ENeiNESr# 
mm^sF MB BOILERS. U 





Carry Engines and Boilers in Stock for Immediate Delivery. 
L H. P. GREGORY & CO., Agents, San Francisco, Cal. 




MlMm 

t^> P AND 



>.'.'.'.'.».'.'.'.'.'»'.'.' 



CIENTIFIC 



* • * • * • 



• ••*•*•*•*•*•» 



4o Illustrated Journal of 




BY DEW ! 

Publlabera. 

Treating Gold-Bearing Clays. 

In iilluvial formationa auriferous, but tewi- 

oioua slay is often found. Special impl< i I 

01 treating Buch 
gold-bearing •lays, and theae nr.- known as 
puddling machines. The original and moat 
simple 

i ighteen inub.es 
deep; or even half a large barrel is commonlj 
ti3ed,wh< ins are conducted on n mall 

scale. Into this tkoclaj is thrown, and sup 
plied with plenty of water. The mixture is 
nredi onstantly with o Bhovel, prong or 
rake, till the clay is thoroughly disint 

pended i" the water, when a plug, in 
. ir the bottom of thetub.ia withdrawn, 
and the thin mud, or rather muddy water, is 
allowed to escape. A fresh supply of clay and 

water is now admitted, and the stirring | - 

i repeated; this continues until the box has be 
come filled with gravel, sand, etc., to the level 
of the plug hole, when operations are suspended, 
and the deposit containing the gold, if there 
was any in the material treated, is taken out 
and washed up in a cradle or pan. Where oper- 
ations are more extended, an upright shaft. 
furnished with Btrong arms, is placed in the 
of the tub, and set in motion by a miter 
wheel, driven by horse or steam power. In 
this State puddling is seldom resorted to, though 
it is occasionally. In Australia, on the other 
hand, water is not so plentiful, and there the 
puddling machine is in common use. It oon- 
sists ul a circular space, whose sides and bottom 
arc lined with hard wood or iron, and in tin- 
center of which revolves a perpendicular shaft 
worked by horse power. From the cross beam 
on this shaft depend two harrows, which are 
dragged round the circle, and puddle the dirt 
on their way. Sufficient water must, of course, 
he continually supplied. The gold and sandy 
matters collect at the bottom ..I the circle, and 
are removed at intervals and panned nut. 

A sketch plan and sections of a combined 
cradle and puddling machine, which wo take 
from Alfred <:. J.ock's new work on "Gold," 
presented by Spon & Co., are shown in the ac- 
companying Hgurc. 

The necessary power is derived from an over- 
shot water wheel, eight feet in diameter, which 
communicates with the puddling shaft by two 
drums and a belt, and with the cradle by means 
of a rod connected with a crank fixed at the 
other end of the puddling shaft. The wash- 
dirt is thrown into the puddling trough, which 
is supplied with water, and in which revolves 
an axle furnished with twenty-live iron arm.-. 
Hence the wash-dirt mixed with water How.-. 
into the hopper at the top end of the cradle. 
The bottom of this hopper is of sheet iron, per- 
forated with 3- Hi inch holes. In the cradle arc 
seven tiers of blanket tallies, made of ] inch 
pine boards, anil varying in length so that each 
one receives its due proportion of sludge from 
the hopper. The blankets arc washed three 
times a week, and the slime is concentrated in 
an ordinary small cradle, the gold being finallj 
amalgamated. The plan and sections an- drawn 
tu a scale of ti foet= 1 inch. The cradle has an 
inclination of (i inches and an oscillation of 12 
inches. 

Tin-; construction of railroads this year has 
fallen off nearly one-half from the number of 
miles constructed the first of last year — 2,o01t 
miles, as against 4,990 miles last year. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1883. 



Mining Imnrovements. 

[n conversation this week with Mr. Martin 
White, Mn' well km-wii mining man, "<■ were 
)<li < ..I to hoar him say that, in hie opinion, 
mining matters in * lalifornia will be much 
better for the next ten years than the} have 
been in the past decade. He has traveled ex- 
tensively through the State, and is an owner 
of considerable mining property, and it is his 
conviction that our mining interests are grad- 
ually Improving. As lung ago as the Comstock 



■ tit dow u fn 



i there 



<>f Late, and recent news 
is very encouraging. Ho also has an interest 
in a mine ueai the famous Rainbow, Chipp's 
Flat, Sierra county. His mine i-- next the Gold 
King! owned by Mr. Wilder, The Uold King 
struck quartz at 100 foot deep, assaying 
st, 194.8*2 |«-i toil. It is on the same lead as the 
Rainbow. Mr. White's claim is known as the 

Albany. He thinks tin' mining interests ul 

sierra county are greatly impiw ing. 

He lias recently visited Arizona, going to the 
Copper Queen, at Bisbcc, Tombstone mines, 




Tf ij 

COMBINED CRADLE AND PUDDLING 

excitement, people left good properties here to 
prospect fur silver in Nevada. Ever since then 
mining property in this State has been compar- 
atively neglected. Lately, however, a decided 
improvement has taken place, and old proper- 
tics have been re-opened in many parts of Cali- 
fornia. New mines have been opened tun, 
which are being developed by persons of ex' 
perienee. Mr. White feels confident that Cali- 
fornia's mining interests are advancing in a very 
satisfactory manner. 

Mr. White owns an interest in a drift claim 
at Snow Point, up above Moore's Flat, Nevada 
county. Sonic very rich specimens have been 



MACHINE FOK AURIFEROUS CLAYS- 

etc. The best prospect fur a continued large 
camp in the Territory is at the latter place, in 
his opinion. The mining properties there, be 
is assured, will continue to pay largely for a 
long time to eoine. 

Altogether, Mr. White considered the state 
of the mining industry as very encouraging in- 
deed. Everywhere are indications of prosper- 
ity and improvement. 

Rei'okts from the Silver Mountain, Uig 
Cottonwood, continue very encouraging. 
The big ore body is improving and the road 
to the mine is being pushed ahead vigorously. 



VOLUME XLV1I 
Number 4. 

Prevention of Mining Accidents 

Within the past few yean, and li 
ticularly, so much care has been taki n i i 

Britain fur I he pre> enl i I minin _■ ni 

thai ;n ery marked decrease liasbecomeapi ■ 
During tho first half of 1883, there lias 
singular, and what may almost be termed an 
extraordinary, immunity from explosions of a 
fatal character throughout the kingdom, when 
thej c i to I"' compared with similar occur- 
rences in the corresponding periods of previous 
years. So far as ran bo ascei tained, the num- 
ber of fatal explosions to the end of June, was 
three, and the killed, only BIX, again&t 1*7 for 
the i 0] responding half year of 1882. But each 
of these three explosions were really prevent- 
able, so that with proper precaution, there 
should have been no death whatever from sneh 
a cause. Still, it is gratifying to find such a 
satisfactory state of things, which, in all prob- 
ability, may be attributed to the introduction 
of more perfect systems of ventilation, the use 
of the best safety lamps, and the doing away 
with powder for blasting in many districts. It 
may be said that those localities where the 
mines are considered the most fiery, ami \\ here, 
in former years, the most terrible explosions 
recorded have taken place have, so far as the 
year has gone, been free from explosions. This 
has been the case as regards Yorkshire, I.Hir- 
bam, Lancashire and Staffordshire, whilst only 
two persons were killed in South Wales. 

When it is considered how large a mining 
field is covered, and how many thousands of 
miners are working underground in the deep 
English mines, this immunity from accident is 
remarkable. And it must be remembered, more- 
over, that a large number of the mines being 
worked are fiery, and liable to explosion at any 
time carelessness occurs. All three of the ex- 
plosions referred to were due to naked lights. 

The English government exeivises close scru- 
tiny, its duly appointed officials properly inspect- 
ing all matters relating to thcniiues where there is 
liability of accident. Managers have to pass 
examination as to their knowledge of appliances 
for working mines, and understanding of causes 
and prevention of accident. Everything is so 
systematic now, and such careful inquiry is 
made when accidents do occur, that, feeling 
the responsibility, the managers, inspectors and 
foremen have been' made extremely cautious. 
This system is bearing fruit as the rusult of this 
year's working is shown. The number of acci- 
dents and losses of life has been greatly de- 
creased. This shows that due care was all that 
was necessary, and that by properly guarding 
everything and exercising precaution, liability 
to accidents in mines is largely lessened. 



The Water-Ejector in Mining. — In the 
Bleiberg district, Austria, an application of the 
ejector has been made in milling. It is driven 
there by hydraulic power, to raise the water 
from a winze. It lifts 366 gallons a second 
from a depth of 92 feet, using 435 gallons of 
power water with a head of 017 feet, thus show- 
big an efficiency of 12 per cent. It is expected, 
however, that this power will suffice to carry 
the winze down to '200 feet, so that the efficiency 
would then be fully 'JO per cent. The ejector 
is now working only six hours a day, doing the 
work of 10 men at hand pumps in *24 hours. 
This system is, therefore, worthy of the atten- 
tion of those who must sink at isolated points 
below a tunnel level in which a head of water 
is available. 






50 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 28, 1883 



GORRESPONDENQB 
Letter from New Mexico. 

Editors Press: — I send you herewith a few 
items about the mines in this part of New Mex- 
ico. Our camp lies in the northwestern corner 
of Grant county, near the Hue of Arizona, eigh- 
teen miles from the copper mines at Clifton, and 
on the same belt. The leads carry copper, gold 
and silver — formation, porphyry, granite and 
syenite. The silver occurs in the form of black 
sulphurets and horn silver, the gold being in- 
cluded in the same rock. The copper lies prin- 
cipally in beds by themselves. 

There are here a number of claims on which 
work has been done. Among these are the 
Mitchell, having one ninety and one fifty-foot 
shaft, and one hundred tons of ore on dump, 
averaging $96.60 silver and $5 gold per ton, and 
the Tuck mine, with the same amount of work, 
and ore out. The Silver Rain has two hun- 
dred and ten feet of work done on it— one shaft 
one hundred feet deep, another fifty feet deep, 
with sixty feet of drifts— and two hundred and 
fifty tons of ore on dump, averaging seventy- 
five ounces silver and $16 gold per ton. We 
have had a thorough sample made of our ores 
with the result above, which beats the Tomb- 
stone mines. 

The Little Emily, the Great Eastern, Nugget, 
Diamond, Eagle, Rose, Rainbow, and a number 
of other mines, all look as well as those men- 
tioned for the amount of work done on them. 

In the West Camp, three miles from us, the 
Carlisle mine, which has a twenty-stamp mill, 
is turning out bullion in considerable quantities. 
The output of April was $48,000, with ten to 
fifteen stamps, and for May, under twenty 
stamps, some $65,000. The above are all in 
the Steeple Rock mining district. 

Wood and water not over-plenty, but plenty 
of water will be reached in depth, and wood 
will last until the railroad gets through. The 
nearest depot is twenty miles off, with good 
roads to it. From Lordsburg on the railroad to 
Duncan is thirty-eight miles, and nine miles 
from there to this camp. 

Arthur H. Cad well. 

Richmond, Grant Co., N. M., July 3, 1883. 



The Boss Copper Smelters, 

Two men, who are working at the Crown Point 
mine, Gold Hill, recently went out to the Lud 
wig copper mine, Mason valley, and melted up 
everything in sight in the shape of ore. 

There was out there a thirty-ton water-jacket 
furnace, but none of the scientific smelters had 
ever been able to make it pay or do much with it. 
The men who went out from the Crown Point 
are two Baltimore boys— practical copper smel- 
ters. The father of one of the men has a cop- 
per-smelting establishment in Baltimore. The 
other has been all through Arizona, where he 
worked at the Copper King and other mines. 

The pair took hold of the furnace out at Ma- 
son valley, and made a success of it from the 
start. They ran through 639 tons of ore — 
everything that was on the dump, just as it 
came out of the mine — and extracted over 
seventy tons of copper, which was molded into 
ingots, weighing from 100 to 700 pounds. 

They used as fuel coke and charcoal, and say 
they can work to a big profit any ore that goes 
ten per cent in copper. They say there are 
plenty of mines in Mason valley and all through 
that region which yield ore very much richer 
than that worked by them at the Ludwig mine, 
and if any one wants it smelted, all he has to 
do is to put up a furnace and let them at it. 

They say the ores here are just as easily 
smelted as any they have ever seen in Arizona 
or anywhere else. The young man who was 
down in Arizona says he has seen the same 
trouble with furnaces in that country, when 
professors from the colleges undertook to run 
them. He says they understood very well 
what to put into the furnaces, and all the chem- 
ical part of the business, but that was the end 
of their knowledge. When the furnace was 
charged and fired up, they had no practical 
knowledge in regard to running it, and failed 
without knowing why, but generally found fault 
with the construction of the furnace. 

Out here at. the Ludwig mine the two men 
ran through the whole dump, just as it was 
taken from the mine. The ore contains a good 
deal of cobalt and nickel, but they shoveled it 
all in together and brought it out in bars. Much 
richer ore than that they worked can be found 
in the Ludwig mine, but they determined 
to make a success of the whole mass as dug 
down. 

The mine is twenty-five miles from the Car- 
son & Colorado railroad The station at which 
they take off coke for the furnace and to which 
they haul their bars is Stinking Wells. The 
.Tones family — Senator J. P. and Sam- -are 
principal owners of the Ludwig mine. The 
boys who did the smelting have our thanks for 
a neat little bar of copper weighing about a 
pound. They can be found at the Crown Point 
mine by anyone who has a furnace that he can't 
run and ore that will go ten per cent and over. 
— Territorial Enterprise. 

Booming.— The Colorado river is higher at 
the present time than it has been for eight years, 
and the current is so strong that it is with great 
difficulty boats can be made fast to the shore. 
The Urge ropes, knownas "hawsers," are snapped 
in two, as though they were but twine. The 
low bottoms along the river are all under water. 



Our Local Industries. 

Number of Persons Employed — Material 

Used and Value of Manufactures as 

Shown by the Assessor's Report. 

The following statistics, allowing the condi- 
tion of the manufacturing and labor interests of 
this city during the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1SS3, have just been completed in the office of 
Assessor Holtz. The figures give the number 
of establishments conducting the various 
branches of industry, the number of men, women, 
and boys employed in each, amount of material 
used and value of goods manufactured: 

Agricultural implements manufactories, 2— Men 
employed, 60; value of manufactures, $120,000. 

Air compressors manufactory, 1 — Men employed, 
10; value of mnnfactures, $7,000. 

Artificial stone man u factories, 1 — Men employed, 
60; value of manufactures, $120,000. 

Axle grease manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 9 ; 
resin consumed yearly, barrels, 1,428; butter con- 
sumed yearly, pounds, 33,000; chemicals consumed 
yearly, pounds, 28,000; value of manufactures $49,- 
000. 

Barrel manufactories. 3 — Men and boys employed, 
250; barrels, half-barrels and kegs made annually, 
450,000; horse-power of steam engines, 112; barrels 
made for use of sugar refineries, 104,000; syrup kegs 
made by tub and pail factories, 18,000; aggregate 
value of manufactures, $330,000. 

Bag manufactories, 3 — Men, women and boys em- 
ployed, 340; aggregate value manufactured, $2,000,- 
000; number of bags manufactured, 9,000,000. 

Bedspring manufactories, 4 — Men employed, 24; 
coppered wire used, tons, 166; aggregate value man- 
ufactured, $104,000. 

Iron bedstead manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 
5; value of manufactures, $10,000. 

Bellows manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 6; bel- 
lows manufactured, 1,600; value of manufactures, 
$20,000. 

Bedding manufactories, 7 — Men employed, 100; 
value of manufactures, $350,000. 

Billiard table manufactories, 3 — Men employed, 
19; billiard tables made, 120; value of manufactures, 
$16,000. 

Boot, shoes and slippers manufactories, 138 — Men 
women and boys employed, 3,400; value of manu- 
factures $5,400,000. 

Box manufactories (wooden), 6 — Men employed, 
330; horse-power of steam engines, 330; lumber 
used, feet, 14,500,000; value of manufactures, $600,- 
000. 

Box manufactories (paper), 3 — Men, women and 
boys employed, 100; number of boxes made annually, 
2,250,000; value of manufactures, $75,000. 

Box manufactories (cigar), 3 — Men, women and 
boys employed 260; number of boxes made annually, 
2,250,000; value of manufactures, $265,000. 

Brass foundries, 6 — Men employed, 350; value of 
manufactures, including copper, 500 ton, $535,000. 

Breweries, 34- — Men employed, 356; hops con- 
sumed annually, pounds, 650,000; barley consumed 
annually, tons, 28,000; beer made annually, barrels, 
320,000; aggregate value of manufactures, $2,205,- 
000. 

Broom manufactories. 10 — Men employed, 65 ; 
value of manufactures, $230,000. 

Brush manufactories, 6— Men employed, 67; value 
of manufactures, $137,000. 

Candle manufactories. 2 — Men employed, 70; can- 
dles manufactured, boxes, 150,000; value of manu- 
factures, $350,000. 

Clothing manufactories, 17 — Men and women em- 
ployed 2,300; value, including overalls, suits and 
underwear, $3,750,000. 

Cigar manufactories, 223 — Men, women and boys 
employed, 7.478; cigars made annually (102,900,000; 
cigarettes made annually, 15,000,000. 

Cracker manufactories, 3 — A Ten employed, 155; 
horse-power of engines, no; aggregate value of 
manufactures, $500,000. 

Chemical works, 2 — Men employed, 52, nitrate 
soda used, ton, 1,800; sulphur used, tons, 1,860; 
nitric acid produced annually, pounds, 2,560.000; 
sulphuric acid produced annually, pounds, 10.501,- 
000; muriatic acid produced annually, pounds, 423,- 
600; value of manufactures, $520,000. 

Carriage and wagon manufactories, 30 — Men em- 
ployed, 290; carriages and wagons made annually, 
550; aggregate value of all branches, $100,000. 

Car manufactories, 1 — Men employed, 10; number 
of cars manufactured, 100; value of maufacUires, 
$60,060. 

Coffee and spice milts, 16 — Coffee ground and 
roasted annually, pounds, 3,980,000; chocolate made 
annually, pounds, 450,000; spices ground annually, 
pound, 656,000; aggregate value of manufactures, 
$900,000. 

Coffin manufactories, 1 — Men employed, 11; ag- 
gregate value of manufactures, $20,000. 

Coppersmiths, 1 — Men employed, 33; value of 
manufactures, $126,000. 

Cordage and rope manufactory, 1 — Men employed, 
150; hemp rope manufactured, tons, 3.000; horse- 
power of engines, 250; aggregate value of manufact- 
ures, $600,000. 

Carriage and locomotive car spring manufactory. 
1 — Men and boys employed, 16; springs made, tons, 
150; aggregate value of manufactures, $40,000. 

Cutlery manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 30; ag- 
gregate value of manufactures, $47,000. 

Dry dock (floating!, 2 — Men employed, 15; capa- 
city of docks (one i,8oo and one 800 tons(, 2,600. 

Dry dock (stone), 1 — Length of excavation in solid 
rock (feet), 450; width of top (feet), 120, depth (feet), 
30; width of entrance (feet). 90; capacity of length 
[feet), 425; capacity of drawing (feet), 20; capa- 
city of pumps for clearing (per hour cubic feet), 
325,368; tubular boilers of four-inch tubes, 4; di- 
mensions of each boiler (diameter in inches), 25; 
dimensions each boiler (length in feet), 16; fire sur- 
face of boilers (square feet), 3,800; men employed, 
6. Total cost of work, $675,000. 

Electric machinery works, 1— Men employed, 30; 
capital emplojed, $10,000. 

Elevator manufactories, 3 — Men employed, 24; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $140,000. 

Fringe factories, 2 — Men and women employed; 
90; aggregate value of manufactures, $85,000. 

Flour and feed mills, 8— Men employed, i92;flour 
made annually, barrels, 375,000; hominy made an- 
nually, tons, 100; buckwheat and rye flour annually, 
tons, 650; oatmeal and groats annually, tons, 2,000; 



cornmeal and farina annually, tons, 4,500; feed bar- 
ley, tons, 10,000, cracked wheat, tons, 220; split 
peas, tons, 232; graham flour, barrels, 1,600; 
cracked corn, tons, 2,040; ground feed, tons, 2,000; 
pearl barley, tons, 650. 

Foundries, boiler and iron works, 17 — Men cm- 
ployed, 2,400; pigiron, annually, tons, 24,200; bar 
iron used annually, tons, 25,600; rivets used annu- 
ally, tons, 480; horse-power of engines, 2,100; Cali- 
fornia iron used to June 30th, tons, 7,000; aggregate 
value of manufactures, $4,700,000. 

Fur manufactures, 3 — Men and women employed, 
150; aggregate value of manufactures, $500,000. 

Furniture manufactories, 19 — Men employed, 
ir35o; lumber used annually, feet, 7,000,000; aggre- 
gate value of manufactures, $2,328,000. 

Gas works, 2 — Men employed, about 460; capital 
stock, $12,000,000. 

Glass works, 1 — Men and boys employed, 180; 
furnaces, 2; pots, 14; aggregate value of manufact- 
ures, $175,000. 

Glass cutting, 3 — Men employed, 25; value of 
manufactures, $55,000. 

Glove manufactories, 12 — Men and women em- 
ployed, 160; aggregate value of manufactures, $230,- 
000. 

Glue manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 41; glue 
made, tons, 220; neatsfoot oil, gallons, 30,000; ag- 
gregate value of manufactures, $117,000. 

Gutta percha and rubber manufactories, 2 — Men 
employed, 8; sets machinery, 2; aggregate value of 
manufactures, $24,000. 

Hat and cap manufactories, 18 — Men employed, 
80; aggregate value of manufactures, $275,000. 

Hose and belting, 4 — Hose made annually, feel, 
1,800; belting made annually, feet, equal to one 
inch, 700,000; aggregate value of manufactures, 
$150,000. 

Harness manufactories, 50 — Men employed, 440; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $1,150,000, 

Ink and muscilage, i — Men employed, 13; num- 
ber of do/.en made annually, 13,000; aggregate value 
of manufactures, $18,000. 

Ice manufactories, 3 — Men employed, 15; tons 
made'annually, 1,200; capital invested, $90,000. 

Iron working machines, 2 — Men employed, 3s; 
value of manufactures, $125,000. 

Japanning and galvanizing manufactories, u. — 
Men and boys employed, 20; aggregate value of 
manufactures, $4,800. 

jewelry manufactories, 16— Men employed, 17s; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $650,000. 

Laundries, white, 105 — Men, women and boys 
employed, 935. 

Laundries, Chinese, 186 — Men employed, 1,300. 

Lead pipe and shot manufactory, 1 — Men em- 
ployed, 30; lead pipe and shot made, tons, 1,750; 
horse power of engines (2) 500; aggregate value of 
manufactures, $200,000. 

Lead smelting works, 1— Men employed, 116; 
horse power of engine, 60: aggregate value of man- 
ufactures, $400,000. 

Last manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 14; horse 
power of engines, 22; lasts manufactured annually, 
29,000; aggregate value of manufactures, $12,000. 

Linseed oil works, 2 — Men employed, 60; oilcake, 
tons, 4,300; capacity of works yearly, gallons, 
8,000,000; value of oil, $580,000; value of cake, 
$135,000. 

Macaroni and vermicelli factories, 8— Men and 
boys employed, 56; macaroni and paste made, boxes, 
200,000; flour used, barrels, 12,000; horse power of 
engines, no; aggregate value of manufactures, 
$200,000. 

Marble works, 35 Men employed, 180; aggregate 
value of manufactures, $290,000. 

Match factories, 2 — Men employed, 90; matches 
made annually, gross, 300,000; value ot manufact- 
ures, $125,000. 

Malt houses, 6 — Men employed, 100; grain malted 
annually, tons, 30,000; value of products, $160,000. 

Mirror manufactories, 2- Men employed, 9; num- 
ber of square feet manufactured, 5,500; capital in- 
vested, $190,000. 

Musical instrument manufactories, 2- -Men em- 
ployed, 35; aggregate value, $40,000. 

Oil clothing manufactories, 4 — Men employed, 35; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $60,000. 

Oakum manufactory, 1 — Men employed, 20; bales 
made annually, 13,000; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, $52,000. 

Pickle and fruit-preserving manufactories, 12 Men 
and women employed, 2,000; fruit and meat put up, 
dozen cans, 600,000; pickles put up in kegs, 90,000; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $1,600,000. 

Provisions packing, 2 — Men employed, 160; meat, 
packed, barrels, 10,000; pork packed, barrels, 10,500; 
ham and bacon, pounds, 3,000,000; lard, pounds, 
2,300,000; tallow, pounds, 1,300,000; value of in- 
vestment in real estate, fixtures, etc., $165,000; ag- 
gregate value of products, $2,000,000. 

Rolling mill, 1 — Men employed, 540; horsepower 
of engines. 725; scrap-iron used, tons, 26,095; co:i ' 
consumed, 18,956; aggregate value nf manufactures, 
$1,868,320. 

Salt works. 3— Men employed, 32; run of stones, 
8; number of tons annually, 30,000; aggregate value 
of salt ground, $250,000. 

Safe and vault works, 4 — Men employed 20; bar 
and plate-iron used, tons, 53; horse-power of engines, 
60; steel used, tons, 35; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, $95,000. 

Saw manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 41; horse- 
power of engines, 44; steel used annually, tons, 61; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $122,000. 

Sash and doorblind and finishing manufactories, 
15 — Men employed, 1,550; horse-power of engines. 
1,050; lumber consumed annually, feet, 10,055,000; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $5,010,000. 

Silver ivare manufactories — Men employed, 45; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $150,000. 

Shipyards 4 — Men employed 200; number of 
steamers, barges and other vessels built, 33; tonnage, 
6,000; aggregate value of crafts built, $500,000. 

Shirt manufactories, 7 — Men and women employ- 
ed, 2,550; value of manufactures, $950,000. 

Soap manufactories 17— Men employed, 130; soap 
made annually, 15,256,000 pounds; aggregate value 
of manufactures, $715,000. 

Soda works (bi-carb soda and saleratusi, r — Men 
employed, 10; salsoda manufactured 800 tons; saler- 
atus manufactured, 400 tons; value of manufactures, 
$100,000. 

Sugar refineries, 2— Men employed, 360; sugar 
(raw used(, 80,000,000 pounds; white sugar made, 
50,000,000 pounds; yellow sugar made, 28,000,000 
pounds; syrup made, 450,000 gallons; aggregate 
value of manufactures, $8,700,000. 

Tanneries, 43 — Men employed 335; horse-power 



of engines, 172; bark used annually, 5,000 cords; 
hides of all kinds, 360,000; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, $1,700,000. 

Tinware, tin box and can manufactories, 4 — Men 
and boys employed, 180; value of manufactures, 
$5"-5,ooo. 

Type foundries, 3 — Men and women employed, ^; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $34,500. 

Vinegar manufactories, 2 — Men employed 22; 
vinegar made annually, 1,600,000 gallons; aggregate 
value of manufactures, $255,000. 

White lead factory, 1 — Building 45x275, 4 stories, 
brick; men employed, 75; number of tons manufact- 
ured, 3,000; capital employed, $290,000. 

Windmill manufactories, 2 — Men employed, 16; 
mills made annually, 160; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, $41,000. 

Willow and woodenware and basket manufactory, 
1 — Men employed, 32; value of manufactures, $250,- 
000, 

Wine and beercask manufactory, i — Men employ- 
ed, 100; number of casks made annually, 3,000; 
value of manufactures, $200,000. 

Wire and wire rope manufactory, 1 — Men employ- 
ed, 50; horse-power of engine, 125; amount of wire 
consumed annually, tons, 750; aggregate value of 
manufactures $360,000. 

Woolen mills, 2 — Men and women employed, 
1,500; number of power loomsr 162; cards, sets, 60; 
frames for knitting underwear, 28; frames for knit- 
ting hosiery, 24; spindles, 21; blankets madeannual- 
ly, pairs, 80,000; knit underwear, dozens, 6,ooo; 
hosiery, dozens, 25,000; wool used, pounds. 5,400,- 
000; cloth and tweed, yards made, 600,000; flannels, 
yards, 1,600,000; 'aggregate value of manufactures, 
$1,900,000. 



Carelessness ia Mining and Assorting 
Ores. 

On this subject, the Black Range, of ( lolorado, 
has tins to say: Many mines, in prosecuting 
their business in this country, have paid too lit- 
tle attention to the formation known as talc. 
This substance is generally found in the neigh- 
borhood of mineral, and common custom has as- 
signed it tu the dump. That there are forma- 
tions that carry mineral other than the general 
accepted ores is being proved so conclusively, 
that to say anything is barren is making an as- 
sertion that is likely to give the lie on test. 
Carbonates, in the early days of Leadville, were 
known to exist, but were supposed to be value- 
less, and hence the bonanza camp lay for years 
undeveloped and unthought of, other than for 
its placer mines. Tellurium is another metal, 
which, though unknown to experts, is not gen- 
erally known at sight by most miners, and tons 
have been consigned to the dump because they 
could not see anything that looked like mineral 
in it. Recently at Bonanza, Colorado, some 
miners working a prospect were throwing this 
valuable mineral over the dump, and other par- 
ties coming along and seeing it bought the prop- 
erty for a fraction of what was in sight and on 
the dump. Lately the Nellie S. mine, on Printer 
Boy Hill, Leadville, lias been consigning talc to 
the waste dump that on assay runs from $20,- 
000 to $50,000 a ton in gold. The Palomas 
Chief has given us some magnificent specimens 
of native silver in talc, and now and then the 
Cuchillos are furnishing specimens that are 
plentifully specked with silver. To prospect 
thoroughly, formations lying adjacent to bodies 
of mineral should be assayed, and hearsay or 
common custom dispensed with. The fact that 
we cannot see mineral in rock is no evidence 
that it is not there, and more caution should be 
observed about rejecting mineral substances 
with which we are not well acquainted. 



Smjelting ami Leaching Ores in Colorado. 
At Golden, Colorado, the ore having been crushed 
by rock breaker and Cornish rolls, is dropped 
through shutes to the calcining department be- 
low. Ores which contain zinc, sulphur and 
antimony are roasted in the caleincrs, where the 
sulphur is expelled, after which the ores are re- 
moved to the smelting department, and there 
melted. The copper, gold and silver being the 
heaviest parts, sink to the bottom, and the slag, 
or worthless residue, remains on top and is 
skimmed off. The gold, silver and copper, or 
matte, which is obtained from the smelting, is 
then crushed until it will pass through a screen 
of eighty meshes to the square inch. The 
matte, which is now as fine as Hour, is then 
taken to the refining furnace and again roasted. 
After this, it is ready for the leaching tubs; and 
here, to the stranger, is the interesting part of 
the works. In this room the silver is separated 
from the matte, and obtained in almost a pure 
state. The matte is placed in the leaching tubs 
through which hot water is running. The sil- 
ver in the matte is_ now dissolved in the hot 
water, and the hot water, with the silver in 
solution, passes out of the tubs into silver cis- 
terns. These cisterns contain several copper 
plates, and the water, with silver in solution, 
passing over them, loses the silver, it being pre- 
cipitated upon the copper plates in the form of 
a sponge. The cisterns are cleansed once a 
week, the silver melted in a crucible, and then 
molded into bricks for shipment. 



Too MUCH Oil. — One day last week the east- 
bound overland train on the Central Pacific 
Railroad met with a singular delay between 
Verdi and Truckee. A freight train was im- 
mediately in front of the passenger train, and 
had among other cars one of oil, which leaked 
badly, flooding the rails with oil, and the over- ■ 
land train, when it reached the spot, came to a 
standstill. The sand boxes were opened, and 
it was with great difficulty that the train could 
be moved at all. Finally it was cut in two, and 
each part started separately. It took two hours 
to make a distance of five miles. 



July 28, 1883] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



LQegh^jmical Progress. 



The Nteded Bran Compressor. 

\\Y referred, a U " weekji since, t" i reward 
fui a bran compressor, We bav< 
that the reoortii of tin patent office begin to 
teem with bran packers, compressors or conaol- 
Their inventors have a difficult prob- 
lem, lint nothing la impossible t«- modern me- 
• ml Kc shall loon have, beyond a doubt, 
n urautii n.1 maohim I ing bran into 

suitable shape for exportation. 

In regard to the great eonuneroial n 
meh a Set ice, the aorthw 4* re .W»//< ;■ informs 
us as follows: "Millers frequentl) say: ' I dont 
care anything about a bran compressing ma 

I don I export anything, 

what benefit it will bo to small millers," which 

shows tin brevity of human vision. Ii the 

ilia '1" export their bran to Europe, tin' 

market it borne will be left free For just so 

much more I nan and offal From the nnalJer 

ui to thai extent proBtable milling will 

poi ted t<. 

thousand European mills, 

(and many of them could not run, were it oot 

ready sale *.f their ofiaia at high prices) 

mi mills will have just io much more 

t • do. This i H why a bran com- 

._ machine is needed by the whole trade, 

and wh) it will be just as benefioial to the mil 

len who never see it as to those who buy it 

and use it. 

Has it occurred to any of the inventors and 
i _ machines to 
figure "ii the probable gain through the use of 
■ v? When they come to estimate 
it they will find the margin extremely small, 
In - lilroada experience n decided change 
of heart At present, with an ordinary bran 
it is easy to get 224 pounds of bran into 
ka making the ton of '2,240 
pounds, whii li is the rule in Europe. In this 
form, rates of freight can he secured as low as 
on Hour to the leaboard. Compressed bran can 
goat ii" better rate under present tariffs, On 
the ocean a difference of about seventy-five 
cents per ton can be obtained in favor of the 
compressed article. So at present we have this 
seventy-five cents on one side of the account, 
and the extra expense of compressing the bran 
(whatever it maj he) on the other, with a 
good demand in existence for non-compressed 
Bran on the one hand, and a prejudice against 
the compressed article on the other. We are 
not croaking, but are stating the facts just as 
they exist. To make bran compressing possible 
and profitable the railroads must discriminate 
in its Favor, and the British and continental 
public must be educated up to its use. Here is 
good work for the National Association." 






How Screws are Threaded. 

We condense from a cotemporary as follows: 
Screw threads are generally originated in a 
lathe. All lathe turning with regular and con- 
stant Feed is screw-cutting or threading. It is 
therefore evident, that with a proper speed, feed 
and tool, a Screw thread would result. 

Many screws arc threaded by dies, which 
may be called hollow screws or nuts with cut- 
ting edges. These arc sometimes worked by 
hand, often by power. The old-fashioned dies 
were adjustable so as to be "set up," and could 
be made to cut several sizes or diameters. 

There is another method of cutting threads 
direct from the solid— by milling. The machine 
is entirely automatic, the blank to be cut being 
rotated as in a lathe, and a rotary milling tool 
rotating against it. 

Threads on large screws are sometimes 
formed by being cast— a east iron screw. 

For some peculiar purposes threads are formed 
by simply twisting a square or flat bar — a com- 
mon form of band drill which has superseded 
the bow drill being a case in point. A familiar 
instance of a screw thread of this description 
is the ordinary auger or bit. 

Another peculiar method of forming screw 
threads is that of raising a thread by rolling 
between dies, under pressure. Much of the 
''bright wire goods" in the market is made in 
this manner; the thread being generally formed 
by simply rolling — one revolution or a little 
more— the wire between two hardened steel 
plates. 

The threads in nuts are produced either by 
the "originating" method, cutting them in a 
lathe as above described, by being tapped, or 
cast of soft metal, as brass; on a threaded core 
of hard metal as of iron or steel. Hut nuts are 
more generally made by tapping, running one 
two or three successive taps through them, 
either by hand or power. 

Nuts of very thin material, as sheet brass 
for lamp tops, etc., are formed simply by roll- 
ing between spirally corrugated rolls — a work 
analogous to "beading" on tin ware. 

Nails in the Days of our Grandfathers. 
—There is scarcely any manufacturiugprocess in 
which greater progress has been made, during 
the last century than in the production of nails, 
tacks and bolts. To obtain the supply of nails 
during the last century was, by no means, the 
easy problem that it is now, and many substi- 
tutions and make-shifts, such as wooden pins, 
bolts, clamp's, riders, etc., were resorted to, to 
supply the inevitable deficiency. Says the 
Age of Steel, all nails were hammered out by 
hand at the anvil, and nothing like uniformity 
in weight or size was attempted. ■ All were of 



wrought iron, and at beat clumsily oonstrnoted] 
and, because of their softness, when one was 
tried the driver was never rare of its 
ultimate direction. Every hard substance 
tin in -1 them aside, and hobs had to be bored 
for them in hard wood, Unavailing efforts 
were mad* t>. cast uaila singly in molds, hut 
from their brittleneu thej were found worth- 
ha\- nom at handsome nails that were 

made in Kngland and brought t" Virginia in 

tne early part of the 18th century. Like ail 
theii prototypes, these are rudely anaped, gen- 
erally sharp at the point, tike a modi i 
nail, thence rapidly getting thicker to the 
middle, « bene slightly to tin- bead, 
The latter baa in all cases been entirely die- 
Ggured by driving. They arc all alses, From 
half an Inch to five inohes in length, thick or 
thin, wit In nit ngard to length, and bearing 
everywhere tin. imprints ol the hammer. When 
we consider how long it must have taken the 
blacksmith to pound out a keg of these, we oan 
ime slight conception of the advantages 
we enjc) I tern methods andappl 

Amiko an vs. English N\ii,\ -The London 
ougt r, of a late date says that owing to 
indifference to brand on the part of English 
manufacture! • and shippers there ia a steadily 
growing demand for American nails, not only 
in the Australian Colonies, but in the markets 
of South and Central America. American 
nails, indeed, arc now an important item of 
trade with the markets alluded to, and it is 
only in exceptional eases, or by the adoption of 

direct representation, that Knglish makers of 
reputation are able to hold their own. The 
home demand was reported fairly good until 
the reduction declared a few years ago, which 
appears to have had the contrary effect to that 
intended, and buyers have since been holding 
off as if in doubt whether prices had really 
touched the bottom yet. In the export de- 
partment the principal trade stirring of late has 
been with Australia, Chili, and the North of 
Kurope. 

SPIEGELEISKN, — But five companies in the 
United States make the peculiar kind of iron 
known as spiegeleisen: the New Jersey Zinc 
and Iron Company; the Cambria Iron Company, 
Johnstown, Pa. : Carnegie Brothers & Co., 
Limited, Pittsburg; the Briar Hill Iron and 
Coal Company, Youngstown, Ohio, and the 
Lehigh Zinc and Iron Company, Limited, 
Bethlehem, Northampton county, Pa. These 
five companies made only 21,963 net tons last 
year. Spiegeleisen is made in New Jersey, from a 
zinc ore, known as Franklinite. After the 
extraction of the zinc the residue is smelted to 
produce the spiegeleisen, which is a very pe- 
culiar white iron, valuable for steel-making 
from its high percentage of manganese — 10 to 
24 per cent. The original zinc ore is iron 
black in color, and leaves a brown streak. 



A Safety Valve should be large enough to 
discharge all the steam the boiler is capable of 
making. The following rule is that enforced 
by the United States (-Jovernmeiit in fixing the 
area of safety valves for the boilers of ocean 
and river vessels when the ordinary lever and 
weight safety valve is employed: When the 
common safety valve is employed, it shall have 
an area of not less than one square inch for 
each two feet of grate surface. The following 
rule has been prepared by Prof. Thurston: 
Multiply the pounds of coal burned per hour by 
4, and divide this product by the steam pres- 
sure, to which the constant number 10 is added. 



Steel Nails. — We mentioned some time 
since that the manufacture of nails from steel 
was to be commenced soon in Pennsylvania. 
The Harrisburg Nail Works' Co., have com- 
menced the experiment and report that they 
have succeeded in producing a fine article. The 
nails are manufactured from steel made at the 
Pennsylvania Steel- Works, the quality the 
same used in making rails; the nails are pro- 
nounced to be superior to the iron nail. They 
are nicely finished, and drive into the hardest 
of wood without bending. 

Locomotives From Europe.— So great is 
the demand upon the locomotive builders in 
this country, at the present time, that large 
orders have recently been sent to Europe, which 
could not be tilled in season iu this country. 
A large order has been received by Messrs. 
Nasyinth & Co., of Lancashire, Eng., who will 
construct the engines ordered from American 
specifications after the strictly American type 
— it is said that all the locomotive makers in 
the United Kingdom are turning out only 
fourteen engines per month. 

Rolling Liquid Iron. — To roll molten iron 
or steel in a liquid state, a rolling-mill has been 
proposed in which the rolls arc to be cast hol- 
low so as to receive a current of water, which 
will maintain a sufficiently low temperature. 
The metal is to run from a "hopper" or dis- 
tributer and fall between the rolls, becoming 
cooled on contact with them. It is supposed 
that this method of rolling will have the effect 
of freeing the metal from any gases which it 
may contain. 

Steel Nails are largely in use in Eng- 
land, and are said to be rising in favor, and 
some makers are doing rather a brisk trade in 
triangular and grooved nails, which are said to 
possess considerable strength and holding 
power relatively to their weight. 



SeiEj^TIFIG P^OG^ESS. 



Science and Progress. 

It t«K'U the world many centuries t«- reach her 

itage ui intellectual development— the 

stage in which the highest intelligence and the 

beat effoi ta of human activity are enlisted in the 

pursuit oi science; but, having reached this 

stage, the wonder is, in view of the wholesome 

results that we are reaping from it, that the 

ianaand metaphysicians should -■■ long 

have been able to exercise t > i • - dominating inllu- 

i the minds oi men that history shows 

them to have done. 

What the world owes to tin creators ol dog 
mas and architects oi sects, let history tell. Kor 
nearly eighteen centuries they were the sole re- 
positories of the learning i?i ol Kurope : the in- 
tellectual forces of the world centered in them 
and emanated from them. Mow they benefited 
mankind, how they advanced civilization, the 
pitiful pages of mediaeval history record to their 
everlasting shame. Nor was thi: long period of 
darkness simply one of intellectual atrophy. It 
was an age of violent repression of everything 
that savored of independence of thought. In- 
tellectual activity, unless indeed it was exer- 
cised in the direction of riveting still more 
strongly the fetters of mental bondage upon 
mankind, was a crime that was sure to bring 
down upon the irreverent actor condign punish- 
ment, for the thinkers and philosophers of those 
days were so fully taken up with matters relat- 
ing to the futare world, that they condemn man 
to intellectual slavery in this. Having the 
world entirely in their hands, they not only 
failed to advance it mentally, morally and physi- 
cally, but they let and hindered those who might 
and could have done so. 

Happily those times are past, and the world 
has entered upon a brighter epoch, in which 
freedom of thought is not esteemed to be a crime. 
What the coming centuries may have in store 
for the human race the future only will reveal; 
but if we may judge of the intellectual and ma- 
terial advancement of the twentieth century 
from that of the nineteenth, the coming man 
will be as far in advance of the man of to-day as 
the latter is in advance of the unwashed fa- 
natic of the Middle Ages. — Manufacturer and 
Builder. 



A Submarine Observatory. 

If all that is stated in the following is reli- 
able, the story of M. Jules Verne in his " Ten 
Thousand Leagues Under the Sea," may come 
nearer to being realized than has hitherto been 
dreamed of. A correspondent of an English 
technical journal writes to the effect that the 
forthcoming international exhibition of Xice is 
reserving some wonders for those who may pro- 
pose to pass a portion of the winter of 1883-84 
upon the borders of the Mediterranean. ( hie 
of these wonders is a balloon which its inventor, 
M. Toselli, calls "the observatory under the 
sea." It is made of steel and bronze, to enable 
it to resist the pressure which the water pro- 
duces at a depth of 120 meters. This observa- 
tory under the sea has a height of eight meters, 
and is divided into three compartments. The 
upper compartment is reserved for the com- 
mander, to enable him to direct and to watch 
the working of the observatory, and to give to 
the passengers the explanations necessary as to 
the depth of the descent, and what they will 
see in the depths of the sea. The second di- 
vision, in the center of the machine, is comfort- 
ably furnished for passengers to the number of 
eight, who are placed so that they oan see a long 
distance from the vessel or machine. They have 
under their feet a glass which enables them to 
examine at their ease the bottom of the sea, 
with its fishes, its plants and its rocks. The 
obscurity being almost complete at seventy 
meters of depth, the observatory will be pro- 
vided with a powerful electric sun, which sheds 
light to a great distance in lighting these depths. 
The passengers have at their disposal a tele- 
phone, which allows them to converse with 
their friends who have stopped on the steam- 
boat which transports the voyagers to such 
places as are known as the most curious in the 
neighborhood. They have also handy a tele- 
graph machine. Beneath the passengers, the 
third compartment is reserved for the machine, 
which is said to be constructed on natural prin- 
ciples — that is to say, as the bladder of a fish, 
becoming heavier or lighter at command, so as 
to enable the machine to sink or rise, at the 
wish of the operator. If all that is stated is 
true respecting this wonderful "machine," we 
may well exclaim, What next? * 

Wine Ferments. 

The researches initiated by M. Pasteur upon 
the alcoholic ferments, promise to have an im- 
portant influence, not only upon beer brewing, 
but upon the apparently less artificially con- 
ducted process of fermentation that goes on in 
the production of wine. It seems quite proba- 
ble that the quality of wine of any year is as 
much affected by the particular mold which 
predominates during the fermentation, as by 
the amount of sunshine or rain during the 
growth of the grapes, or even the passage of a 
comet through the sky. In Germany, it is al- 
ready the practice to sterilize the must and 
then to sow it with some selected ferment, a 
process favorable to the elimination of various 
"false" ferments (species of Dematii) that are 
common to the surface of the grape and other 



fruit, while the custom in some southern ooun- 
decanting the must as soon as the first 
appears, may have the same effect. In a 

recent c u uni ition Oi 

1,369) M. Le Bel incidentally remarks that last 
year hoik- of the grape collection with which he 
had to do underwent fermentation influenced 

by what Pasteur considers to be the true win. 

ferment, [8a* karomx Sees, but 

waa all fermented by S, Pastortanus. M. Le 

Bel also states that a natural must yields a 
larger proportion of the higher alcohols than a 
solution ol sugar fermented with the same for 
ment, and as the higher alcohols are more in 
jurious to health than ordinary alcohol, it would 
appeal that a beer made partly from sugai i 

quite as wholesome as one made solely fr 

malt. 

Tub Stob ion Battj ry. When the " stoj 
ago battery" was s.. far improved as to win 
indorsement from sir William Thompson, it 
was thought that by its aid the electric lamp 
would be rapidly introduced into dwelling* ; 
but the storage batteries oan hardly be said 
to answer satisfactorily the expectations funned 
of them. Some experts elaim that they have 
demonstrated by experiment that the storage 
battery as now constructed is boo oostly for 
practical use. The late discovery of this fact 
is because the cost of the battery is greatly 
increased bj the serious deterioration it un- 
dergoes. If it were permanent, ;is it was at 
first supposed to be, it is not too eOStly; but 
if it depreciates at the rate of at least thirty 
per cent per annum, as is alleged, it is oot 
commercially useful, except for limited kinds 
of work. On the other hand, it may lie said 
that there is sti 1 hope of rinding means to make 
the storage battery permanent and cheap enough 
for practical use. Sir William Thompson, out 
of several hundred batteries, has found one or 
two that unaccountably last without deprecia- 
tion, while the others fail. It is the "unac- 
countable" in the successful batteries that re- 
mains to be discovered and applied to all. If 
one will work, all can be made to work, though 
it may require considerable research to find the 
conditions essential to success. 



What is Carbon ? — Mr. Berthelot, in the 
Journal de Pharmaeii et t?<- Chimie, treats of 

the elementary constitutions of carbon in a 
somewhat novel style. He says that from cer- 
tain peculiar physical relations he is inclined to 
think that the true element of carbon is not yet 
known, and that it will eventually be found 
that graphite and diamond are not really iden- 
tical, but are substances of a different order. 
M. Berthelot alleges that elementary carbon 
ought to be gaseous at ordinary temperatures, 
and that the various kinds of carbon which oc- 
cur in nature are in reality polymerized pro- 
ducts of the true element of carbon. Spectrum 
analysis is considered to confirm this view : for 
a spectrum recognized along with that of hydro- 
gen in the light of comets is held to indicate a 
gaseous carbide, probably acetylene. If this 
hypothesis should be maintained by further re- 
search, it will be'shown that the claim advanced 
on behalf of hydrogen to be considered as 
the fundamental element of the universe must 
be modified to embrace carbon. The spectrum 
in question is also shown by the Geissler tube. 

Rarely in the history of science, says the 
Lmu; I, lias a distinguished career equaled in 
its length that of M. Chevreul, whose name 
is best known in connection with his investi- 
gations on color; and it is probably altogether 
unique for a savant to be able, before one of 
the most distinguished scientific societies in 
the world, to refer to remarks which he made 
before the same society more than seventy 
years previously. Recently M. Chevreul made 
a communication to the Academie des Sciences, 
and at its close he observed: "Moreover, gen- 
tlemen, the observation is not a new one to 
me. I had the honor to mention it here, at 
the meeting of the Academie des Sciences, on 
the 10th of May, 1812!" 



Human Hair Under the Microscope. — E. 
B. Tylor, in Nature, says that the microscopic 
examination of the cross section of a single hu- 
man hair is sufficient to determine to which one 
of the race divisions of humanity the wearer be- 
longs. If examined microscopically by Primer's 
method, it shows circular, or oval, or reniform. 
Its follicle curvature may be estimated by the 
average diameter of the curls as proposed by 
Moseley. Its coloring matter may be estimated 
by Sorby's method. There has been even a sys- 
tematic classification of man published by Dr. 
\V. Midler, of the Novara expedition, which is 
primarily arranged according to hair, in straight- 
haired races, curly-haired races, etc., with a 
secondary division according to language. 

Photographic Speech. — Deaf-mutes are 
taught to speak and comprehend by watching 
the movements of the lips. According to the 
photographic News, M. Wanerke has photo- 
graphed the face of a man in which these 
movements were perfectly defined, so as to 
have the exact form corresponding to each 
sound. By means of these photographs inex- 
perienced persons have been enabled to recog- 
nize the different articulations. 



A new vegetable parasite, Haplococcun reUvn- 
lalus, has been recently discovered in pork by 
Dr. Zopf. It occurs in from thirty to forty per 
cent of the animals examined. "Would* it not be 
well if we paid more attention to the sanitary 
legislation of Moses, a fragment of the ancient 
medical law of Egypt 1 



52 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 28, 1883 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 

Compiled every Tiickkday from Advertisements in Mixing and Scientific Phkss and otuer S. F. Journals. 



ASSESSMENTS-STOCKS ON THE LI3TS OF THE BOARDS. 



I'uMI-W'V. 

AltiiS M Co.. 
Amies S MCY 
Argentu M V< 

Albion U»i " 



No. am't. Levied, delinq'nt, Saj»e. 
25. .July 3. .Aug 7.. ..Aug 27. 



Secretary. 
Win. H. Watson 

H Burris 

B M Hall. . 



i MC< 



LOCA' 
Nevada. .2(5.. 

Nevada. .22.. 

Nevada. .16.. 

Nevada.. 14. . 

Nevada. .19. . 

California M Co Nevada.. 8.. 

Caledonia M Co Nevada.. 39.. 

KxcelsiorD G M Co California. ,22.. 

Excelsior D G M Co California.. 1.. 

Exchequer M Co Nevada.. 19. . 

Grand Prize M Co Nevada.. 14.. 

Goidd & Curry M Co Nevada. .45.. 

II i ilnies M Co Nevada. . 7 . . 

Hale & Norcross M Co Nevada.. 77.. 

Justice M Co Nevada. .39.. 

Mexican MCo Nevada.. 23.. 

Martin White M Co Nevada. .15.. 

Savage M Co Nevada. .56. . 

Ti]i Top iM Co Arizona.. 6.. 

Union Con M Co Nevada.. 25. 

Utah S M Co Nevada. .45, 

Virginia Cou M Co California.. 10. 

OTHER COMPANIES-NOT ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS 



Place of Business. 

Montgomery st 



.. 3Q9 Montgomery st 

327 Pine st 

. . .309 Montgomery st 

...309 Montgomery st 

. . 309 Montgomery st 

414 California st 



Tunc 27 . . Aug 2 Aug 

25. .June 21. .July 24 .. Aug 17 

50. .July 17. .Aug 20 Sent 8.. AW Havens 

20. .July 11. .Aug 15.. ..Sept 5. .A W Havens. . 
20. .June 26. .Aug 4. . . .Sept 3..C P Gordon.. . . 
20. .June 15. .July 19. . . .Aug 9. .R Wegener. . . . 

40.. June 16.. July 23.... Aug 10. ,T J Wattaon 114 Davis st 

5 00. .June 5. .July 9.... July 26. .W. Cunningham 326 Montgomery fit 

20.. June 14.. July 19.... Aug 9..CE Klliott 327 Finest 

25.. June 25.. July 27.. ..Aug 20. .EM Hall 327 Pine st 

50.. June 15.. July 20. ...Aug 13. . A K Durbrow 309 Montgomery st 

30 .June 27.. July 30.... Aug 21.. C T Bridge 224 California st 

50. .June 7. .July 11.. ..Aug 2..SF Lightner 309 Montgomery st 

10.. July 9.. Aug 13.... Sept 3.. RE Kelly 419 California st 



. 50,.J»dy 17. .Aug 22. ...Sept 11. .CL McCoy.. 

25.. July 9.. July 11... Aug 8,. J J Scoville 

50.. July 19.. Aug 21.... Sept 10.. E B Holmes 

25 May 29.. July 6 Aug 6..HDeas 

50..JiUy 17..Ai;g 21.. Sept 11. .J M BufHngton. . 

1.00... July 20.. Aug 27 .. Sept 14..GCPratt 

01.. July 24.. Sept 3.... Sept 24.. A F Benard 



309 Montgomery st 
... 309 Montgomery st 
. . .309 Montgomery Bt 
.. 309 Montgomery st 

309 California st 

. . .309 Montgomery st 
364 Howard st 



Alexander M Co Nevada.. 2. . 

Bald Mountain MCo California.. 2.. 

Champion MCo California.. 12. . 

Eiutracht G MCo California.. 2.. 

Genesee M Co California.. 1-. 

Coodshaw M Co California, .14. . 

Gorilla M Co California.. 1.. 

Hazard Gravel MCo California . . 7 . . 

Homeward-bound M Co California.. 2.. 

Lima Con M Co Arizona.. 6.. 

Pacifiic M& Reducing Co. . . .California. . 1.. 

Pittsburg M Co California . . 16 . . 

Roma Union M Co .Nevada.. 2.. 

West Branch Feather Rivi-r M <<i..Cal.. 1.. 



.00.. June 20.. Aug 6.. 
3.. June 26.. July 27. 
10.. June 4.. July 34 . 
05.. June 12.. July 7. 
40.. June 20.. July 30. 
10.. June 6.. July 14., 
10.. June L.July 7. 
14. .June 20. .July 21.. 
25..July 23.. Aug 27., 
05.. June U.. July 18.. 
25.. June 20.. July 25.. 
10. .July 24.. Aug 28.. 
02.. June 18.. Aug 
OL.Jidy 16. -Aug 



.Aug 27. . J K Warren. . . 
..Aug 30..L Shannaliao. . 
..Aug 11. .T Wetzel., 



-Aug 
.Aug 

■ Aug 
Aug 



. .307 Montgomery st 

125 First st 

. , 522 Montgomery st 



.H Kuuz 209 Sansoine st 

.1 Stedtfeld 419 California st 

;C C Harvey 309 Montgomery st 

.A A Euquist 436 Montgomery st 



.Aug 10. .J T McGeoghegan. 



..318 Pine st 



.Sept 10.. A S Bowie 314 Montgomery st 

.Aug S..RD Hopkins 436 Montgomery st 

. . . Aug 15. .J W Beviling 413 California st 

. . .Sept IS. .R Wegener 414 California st 

...Aug 27. .F. X. Simon 518 Sansoine st 

...Sept 10.. A BPaid 328 Montgomery st 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Name of Company 

< 'hampiou M Co 

Derhec Blue Gravel M 
Loreto Mill Co 
MayH.iwer Gravel M C 
McMillianSMCo.. 
occidental M Co. . . , 
New York Hill MCo.. 
Red Hill Hydraulic M 



Location 



Secretary. 



Office in S. F, 



Meeting 



Date. 



California.. B Burris 309 Montgomery st Annual July 30 

Calif ornia..Theo Wetzel.... 522 Montgomeryflfe Annual Aug 9 

H G Jones 327 Pine st Annual Aug 2 

o California...! Mori/.ii 328 Montgomery st Annual July 



Co.. 



Name or Company 
Bulwer Con M Co... . . 

Kentuok M Co 

Navajo M Co 

Silver King M Co 

Standard Con MCo... 



..Nevada.. J Morizio 328 Montgomery st Annual... 

. . .Nevada.. A Iv Durhrow 309 Montgomery st Annual — 

California. .J B Leighton 527 Clay st Annual... 

Co California.. E Hestres 328 Montgomery st Annual... 

LATEST DIVIDENDS-WITHIN THREP1 MONTHS. 

Location. Secretary. Office in S. F. Amount. 

, .California. . W Willis 309 Montgomery st 

... .Nevada. .J W Pew 310 Pine st 

....Nevada.. J W Pew 310 Pine st 

Arizona.. J Nash 315 California st 

. California.. Wm Willis.... 309 Montgomery st 



. .Aug 1 
. . Aug 13 
..July 30 

All" Q 



Payable. 



15 Inly 2 

10 July 19 

25 May 14 

25 Inly 18 

25 June 12 



Table of Highest and Lowest Sales in 
S. F. Stock Exchange. 



Name op 


Wkkk 


Wkkk 


Week 


Wkkk 




Ending 


Enihmi 


Ending 


I'lNUINli 


Cumpanv. 


July 5. 


.Inly 12. 


July 19. 


July 26. 






1.801.50 2 002.00 2.30 


1.90 2.00 




.40 
.45 


.45 .75 1.001 .65 .75 
.50 .45 .50 45 






.40 .75 


Albion 




.45 .40 .50 .35 .41 


35 


Argenta... 


.10 


.15 .05 .10 05 


.05 .50 














1.151 15 1.251.20 1.25 
4.204.25 4.454.15 4. 40 




liest & Belcher 


4 05 


4.O0 i.30 


Bullion 




.75 851 85 


.75 .80 










Belle Mc 




.50j 45! .35 .45 


35 




.HO 


.90, .60 .80, .60 .8( 


65 










.15 .20 


ltii,lie Tunnel 






.31 










05 .5 .25 


25 


California 






.10 .15 .10 .15 


.05 .15 


Challenge 




311 





30 


Ohollar — 


1 III! 


3. Kb 


3.30 3.753.35 3.80 3.50 3.85 


Confidence 


2.10 


2 25 


2.05 2.252.00 2.151.65 1.75 


Con. Imperial 




.1(1 


10 


10 


Con. Virginia 




45 


.40 .501 .35 .55 


.35 .40 


Crown Point 


1 25 


1 311 


1.40 1.45 1.30 1.45 


.65 1.10 


Pay 


,MI 


55 


50 5C 


... .50 


Kike Con 




«i 


1 25 




Eureka Con 


4 10 


5 on 


4.75 6.004.50 5.0C 


4.75 5.00 


Kureka Tunnel 




611 


60i 




Exchequer 




.So 


.20 .25! -20 .5C 




Grand Prize 


05 


111 


051 05 




Gould fc Curry 


i.m 


45 


2.40 2.502.40 3.05 


2.80 3 05 


Hale & Norcrosti... 


i.lHI 


7 on 


si n; 


65 6S 


6.75 7.00 


Holmes 












Independence...... 






60 


50 




Julia 






15 












.20 .25 




Jackson 






35 5C 




KenMick 












Martin White 






05 




25 


Mono 










2.8U 2.95 


Mexican 


2 0(1 


3 on 


2.90 3.15 


2.00 2.95 










4.50 o.oc 


5.00 5.5C 
















Noonday 












Northern Belle 


tii'i 


(i 75 


6J 7.0C 






North Noonday 












Navajo 


.! Oil 


3 M 


2.40 3.2C 


2 85 3.UI3.05 3,40 


North Belle Isle.... 










Occidental 




1 25 




... l.S0| ... 1.75 


Onhir 


SI. Hi 


V 55 


2.40 2.05 




Overman 

(ho 




.30 


40 


.30 .351 35 


Potosi 


1.25 


1.40 


1.45 1.55 


1.50 i.70 1.46 1.60 


T'ioal Con 






60 


65 


Savage 


1 115 


i 111 


1.95 2.05 


2.10 2.45 2.25 2.40 


Sug. Belcher 










J. 55 


3.80 


3.90 4.4513.65 -1.103.80 4.35 


Silver King 




10 


8!so n'.75"6i "«!'" 


Scorpion 






.60 .70 


■55 .65 .60 .65 


















4.90 5g 
2.65 2.85 


4.40 4.95 4. SO 54 
2.40 2.752.30 2.50 




2.75 


2.80 














^ ellow Jacket 


3.65 


3190 


3.75 4.053.75 4 O0'2.75 3.50 




Francisco St 




Sales at San 


ock Exchange 


'I'Hl Ksliw A. ,\l. 


July 26, 










AFTERNOON SESSION. 








100 Alpha 




1 91 


100 Belcher S5o 


30 1) S Belcher.. 




4 15 




460 Ohollar 


..3i(&3 5 


500 Ohollar 3.45 


250 Crown Point.. 




on. 




200 California 




. Hie 




225 Con. Imperial. 


...05l«10 


110 Confidence 1 65 


70 Confidence 




.1 in 




280 Kureka Cou . . . 




., !, 


310 Eureka Con 4 ,80@5 

150 Goidd & Curry 2.90 

500 Grand Prize 05c 

150 Hale & Nor 6i 


125 Gould k Curry 
280 Hale & Nor. . . 




.2.90 


220 Mexican 


...2.95p)3 




. . . .2»3S 


100 Martin White 25c 






. .30c 




50 Potosi 




.1 15 




715 Savage 


2.35@2.4' 


530 Ophir 2.70632.1 






4 15 




150 Sierra Nevada. 






100 Senator 




,,15e 




20 Silver King.... 




. 6* 


400 Senator 15c 






'.I -II 


















■ ^ ■■ 



Colorado, in the first six months of 1883, pro- 
duced 220,947 tons of coal and 74,208 tons of coke. 



Mining Share Market. 

The volume of business in the stock market is 
small, and there is not much going on. The .situa- 
tion on the Comstoek is unchanged, although close 
attention is paid to all news from there. The 
Standard mine of Bodie has paid a total of $84 per 
share in dividends, including the last one. The 
Benton Consolidated company at its annual meeting 
showed receipts for the year at $41,518, of which 
some $21,000 came from assessments. The Lady 
Washington company had receipts in the year of 
$9,921, of which $5,373 was from assessments, and 
$4,285 was a balance. 



Bullion Shipments. 

Horn Silver, July 20th, $9,000; Ontario, 20th, 
$4,318; Stormont, 21st, $2,021; Horn Silver, 21st, 
$12,000; Ontario, 21st, $4,548; Horn Silver, 24th, 
$24,000; Ontario, 24th, $9,014; Mt. Diablo, 19th, 
$6,124; Bodie, 23d, $3,140; Northern Belle, 19th, 
$6,029; Christy, 23d, $8, 18S; Standard, 23d, $14,306; 
Northern Belle, 23d, $5,973; Contention, 21st, $16,- 
113. During the week ending July 21st, inclusive, 
there were shipped from Salt Lake thirty-six cars of 
bullion, 963,190 pounds; thirteen cars ore, 344,020 
pounds, sent west; thirty-three cars ore, 603,000 
pounds, sent to Colorado; making a grand total of 
eighty-two cars, aggregating 1,940,210 pounds. 



Lkjhtim. tile Arizona Mines.— A number 
of mining companies in Arizona, says the Cil't- 
Z€7i, are alaout to adopt the electric light, to 
facilitate operations underground, as well as on 
the surface; among these are the .Silver King 
Mining, the Howell Smelting, and the Conger 
Mill and Mining companies. At the Silver 
King mine it is proposed to use four 3,000 can- 
dle power Brush lights above ground and two 
below, together with twenty-five small incan- 
descent lamps. The dynamo located near the 
main shaft will supply the current, descending 
800 feet to the lower levels of the mine to the 
arc lights and storage boxes, from which latter 
the Swan lamps are to be connected by small 
copper wires. Fixed lamps are to be suspended 
from the roofs of galleries, and the portable 
lights are to be attached to flexible conductors 
for convenience of shifting. These lights are 
to burn continuously, night and day. In the 
reduction works of this company, both large 
and small lights are also to be used, a separate 
dyuatno and two storage battel ies supplying 
the current. The arc light circuit in this mine 
will be about half a mile in length. 



A Chicago company is building machines for 
"consolidating" various waste products into 
compact blocks for use as fuel. Sawdust, shav- 
ings, etc., from saw and planing millsare pressed 
into molds so that 400 to 000 cubic feet of the 
loose material are compacted into less than forty 
cubic feet of blocks of convenient size and form 
to be used as fuel. 



On the French railroads the average number 
of employes per mile is far greater than on 
American lines. Some roads there average 
thirty-one, while the United States average is 
only five. 



II]|JNJIJ\!G SujVlJViy\r^Y. 



The following is mostly condensed from journals puh 
slitil in ihe interior, in proximity to the mines menliuiied 



CALIFORNIA. 

Amador. 

Plymouth. — Amador Dispatch, July 21: There 
is no mining being done outside of the Kmpire and 
Pacific mines, and probably won't be until time to 
work out the vearly hundred dollars and just hold 
the claim. 

Butte. 

Carpenter's Flat.— Oroville Mercury, July 20: 
Capitalists are projecting a scheme, which, it carried 
into effect, will make Oroville one of the greatest 
mining centers in the world. That is the organization 
of a company to mine Carpenter's Flat to the bed- 
rock. It is a well known fact that the entire flat is 
rich in mining ground, but as yet no adequate 
method lias been employed to get rid of the water, 
which is encountered at a short distance from the 
surface. The new company propose to work it by 
means similar to those in operation in the silver mines 
on the Comstoek lode. Powerful pumps are to be 
placed at different points, and it is believed that all 
the water can thus be got rid of. The working of 
this vast gold field will necessitate the employment 
of thousands of men. We are not at liberty to di- 
vulge the names of the projectors, but can state that 
they are gentlemen who are wealthy, and that their 
plans will be put in operation at no distant day. 

MOORETOWN. — Rich. Dickenson, who resides a 
short distance east of Mooretown, brought to our 
office this morning some fine specimens of quartz 
taken from a ledge which crosses Sucker Run not far 
from his house. He represents the ledge as being 
fifty feet wide, and the specmiens brought down by 
him as a fair sample of the entire ledge. The ledge 
crops out from both sides of Sucker Run, and thou- 
sands upon thousands of tons of rock can be ob- 
tained above the water level. There is splendid 
water power near for the driving of all machinery 
necessary for the working of the rock. He also 
brought a specimen of marble which was taken from 
a ledge on the creek, about half a mile above where 
the quartz ledge is found. This ledge of marble is 
about fifty feet wide, and where (Tie creek cuts 
through it, it crops out to a height of seventy-five 
feet. Mr. T. W. Rcecehas taken specimens of both 
quartz and marble, and will send them to San Fran- 
cisco for exhibition. A specimen of the marble will 
be sent to "W. II. Plvmire, Marysville, for testing. 

Indian Si>kt.\u Mines. — Chico Enterprise; The 
managers of the Indian Spring mines, some five 
miles above Magalia. have recently been prospecting 
their cement, and find it to be rich beyond all antici- 
pations. The tailings, even after being run through 
a second time, yield from $40 to $500 per ton. Mr. 
McLean says he can pick up at any time from 
twenty-five cents to four or five dollars from these old 
tailings. The discovery has caused quite an excite- 
ment, and a ten-stamp quartz mill is to be put in 
within sixty days. Very encouraging prospects, also, 
from the Red Hill mine, Where an additional force 
of forty men will begin work in a few days, 

Calaveras. 

MURPHY'S. — San Andreas Citizen, July 21: The 
Oro Plata mill has started up with the new concen- 
trators, five in number, with space for two addition- 
al ones if needed. The 1- "rue Concentrators have 
been in use a number of years, and have given satis- 
faction wherever they have been in use. Mr. Miller 
is erecting a ten stamp mill on the Sunn) Side mine, 
a property located in the Collier district near the 
celebrated Collier mine. Tom Goodwin, superinten- 
dent of the Calaveras mine, returned from the Bay 
last week. He speaks hopefully of the future of this 
mine. Supt. McXevin of the Washington mine is 
convalescing. The mine will soonbeunder hisper- 
sonal supervision. 

Contra Costa. 

Empire Coal Mine. Antioch Ledger, July 21: 
The Kmpire is belter than ever. Last month they 
took out and shipped between 4.000 and 5,000 tons 
of coal, and expect to do the same this month. The 
coal is of first quality, it gives good satisfaction, and 
the demand for it is continually increasing. The 
mine is in excellent working order, with cual in sight 
enough to keep up the supply for years. 

El Dorado. 

GARDEN Yallky. -Georgetown Gazette, July 21: 
The Rosekrans mine, has introduced an air compres- 
sor, and will hereafter use Burleigh drills. This mine 
is about three miles smith of Georgetown. The 
Taylor mine near by, idle for so many years, is in 
the hands of men in San Kranciscp who have refused 
several offers for the properly. 

Greenwood. —The Morrell Con. M. Co.'s claim 
is now the center of attraction. In a drift run from 
the old tunnel splendid ore has been struck, and at 
a depth of 20 ft lower, from the new tunnel, the seam 
has also been found, showing a great improvement 
both in size of lode and quality of the ore. the gold 
brightly glittering in large blotches through the rock, 
which also shows fine gold in liberal quantities. In 
about 10 days the mill will be ready to operate. 

Mono. 
Mount Cury Reduction Works. — Bodie Free 

Press, July 21: Peter Huff", of Virginia city, has been 
awarded the contract to lay the foundations and per- 
form other masonry work for the Mount Cory re- 
duction works. He left Virginia on Fridav for the 
scene of his labors. Mr. Huff tells the Chronicle 
that the quarry, which is situated about a mile and 
three-quarters from the mill site, is the finest in the 
State. 

Detroit Copi'er Works. — C. H. West was out 
at the Detroit Copper company's works Thursday, 
and reports matters progressing very finely there. 
The company will make a shipment of a carload, or 
ten tons, of copper bullion on Sunday. The bars 
are from 250 to 500 pounds in weight. A specimen 
bar of 65 pounds was brought in by stage Friday. 

BoDlE \'S. Arizona. The Free Press of the 20th 
hist, gives the experience of Mr. Y. B. Cross, an 
enthusiastic Bodieite, who has just returned from 
New Mexico and Arizona, and who contrasts the 
prospects of these with those of Bodie in the 
following style: The most prolific thing in the coun- 
try is the newspapers. These papers write up the 
mines and the country in the most extravagant and 



unblushing manner. They make a regular business 
of going around the country in droves of from a 
dozen to twenty-five reporters, writing up the mines 
that there is nothing in, and giving glowing descrip- 
tions of agricultural and grazing land that is so 
burned up that a jack rabbit would starve to death if 
turned loose on it. The country is full of " tender- 
feet," who do not know a mine when they see it. 
The discovery of a hatful of ore will buildup a town 
in a week. Mr. Cross engaged in frequent alterca- 
tions with these ignorant people upon the subject of 
mines, and often informed them that if they had 
such a mine as the Standard of Bodie, they would 
get together a city of forty thousand people which 
is a fact, in his opinion. 

Nevada, 

Magenta, Grass Valley Union., July 20: A 
meeting of the stockholders of the Magenta Con- 
solidated was held on Wednesday evening for the 
purpose of increasing the capital stock from 20,000 
to 100.000 shares. The vote in favor of the increase 
was unanimous, and it was voted thai 20,000 shares 
should be set aside to be sold as a working capital, 
the price to be fixed at fifty cents per share, U was 
also decided to put up steam hoisting works on the 
urine. The Majenta adjoins the Empire company's 
ground, and is regarded as a properly that will be- 
come very valuable. There is now a good working 
incline shaft on the claim to the depth o!" 350 feet. 

Murchie. Nevada Transcript, July 20: The 
Murchie is looking very well; turning out enough ore 
to keep the two mills (18 stamps in all) running right 
along. The Big Blue lead keeps up its reputation, 
while the Independence lead, which had been virtu- 
ally abandoned when superintendent Tillev took 
charge, is improving. The mine is paying well now, 
and it is to be hoped that the days of assessments 
are passed, so far as it is concerned. 

Banner. — A crushing of 3,000 pounds of ore 
taken from the upraise -on the 600 level north of die 
Banner mine paid $300, or at the rate of $200 a ton. 
There is more of the same kind yet in sight. 

The Iron Mink. -Transcript, July 6: Deputy 
Assessor Wheeler gives some interestine, items about 
the iron mine 20 miles below Grass Valley, Using 
80 bushels of coat to the ton of iron, the mini- is now 
turning out 24^ tuns of iron per day, and one day 
30 tons were turned out of the furnace. I ,asl year 
185 bushels of coal were used t<> turn out one ton ol 

iron. There are now 165 men employed about the 
mine. The mine is in a better condition than it has 
ever been, and wood-choppers and teamsters arc in 
demand there. 

Plumas. 

(,n iNf.y. — National, Juh/21: See & folly's mill 
has been running on good rock all the spring, and 
they are taking mil some good ore now from the 
Specimen Ledge. Considerable mining has been 
done this spring and .summer at Willow creek, and 
some good sized chunks taken out. The Spanish 
boys found a chispa weighing seven ounces, a short 
time ago, in their claim across Willow creek from 
Levassc's. Levasse has made a good, spring's run, 
The Young California ledge on Mt. Ararat, be'ow 
the Marlett channel, is paying very well. The 
owners work their rock in an araslra. < ,'uitca num- 
ber of hydraulic claims are in full blast on the Mid- 
dle fork, among them Jack I >el .aps', and the boom 
of the water can be heard from the lop of the moun- 
tain, two miles away. 

Shasta. 

FuKXArKviLl.K.— Redding Free Press, July a\: 
A correspondent says: Our mining interests Ih re 
seem to lie very favorable. Some excellent appear- 
ing bullion is being turned out under the n age- 

ment of Mr. Stewart, the superintendent, win- ap- 
pears to be well pleased with die prospects, and wc 
may now consider the Afterthought works a sui 1 > 
Recently a fine body of ore was uncovered in the 
Peek mine, the assays of which arc very good- Some 
other work is going on in the district. * Various de- 
tentions have occurred, so that the mill has not been 
run continuously. The Hume conveying water in the 
mill had been built for a number of years, and broke 
down in two or three places, but was soon repaired, 
Some of the machinery did not work well on tin 
start, but everything is now going along right. 

Sierra. 

Gibsonvili.e. — 'tribune, Jul) 19: Cos ,v Gur- 
ley have just woundup the season's work in iheii 
hydraulic mine; $30,000 was t] ie amount cleaned up 
The back channel of the Union drift mine is improv- 
ing in extent and richness equal to flic front chi :1, 

which was worked out in earlier years. The two 
owners of this mine recently divided $10,200 as tin 
profit from two months' work with a fori e Ol 3 ran 

At the North American drift mine aboul 70 mi 

employed. Thirty of that number are taking 

gravel. I 'mil recently the whole force lias bi n on 
dead work, such as running ahead tunnels ani 
ways. The mine is now in shape to take out gravi 1 
on a big scale and large returns m.i\ I..- lool 1 '1 foi 
soon. 

Siskiyou. 

Notes. — Yreka Journal, July 11: Siskiyou moun- 
tains are swarming with Chinamen in the vicinity of 
the tunnels and their approaches. The mining com- 
panies on Klamath river are full of business jusl in iw 
in sinking down large cuts to bed rock, with expec- 
tation of soon taking out an abundance of ore. 
Trinity. 

Weaver Basin. — Journal, July 21: Miners in 
Weaver basin are all done cleaning-up and say their 
claims paid as well as usual, considering the limited 
water supply. They will at once commence fixing up 
and get everything in good shape a.s all expect a big 
season next time, 

Eastman Gulch. —The Journal says of a recent 
quartz discovery by "L'ncle Jim" P.lakemore, near 
Kastman gulch on the Trinity river: -'It turns nut 
much better than had been anticipated. Sixteen and 
one half tons of the rock ground in the arrastra pro- 
duced $2,500, or at the rate of $150 to the ton. and 
the rock which they are now running is varioul; j es- 
timated at from $200 to $400 to the ton. The lode 
has well defined walls and widens and improves as 
they go down and in on it. Under these conditions 
it is not surprising that the Blakemores last week re- 
fused $50,000. for their mine, the offer being made' 
by a justly, celebrated quartz mining expert from San 
Francisco. 

Trinity Mines.— Oroville Mercwry, July 20; 
Many of the miners have already cleaned-up for the 
season. As-nearly as can be learned at present, the 
gold yield will fall considerably short of what i con 



Jul* 28, 1883.] 



Mining and .Scientific Press. 



53 






itable to 
. inter. Por ll 
lily of & i 

NEVADA. 

Waahoe Di 
Mrxh I the 3100 

main north drill is brine 
rapidl) tu reach the line ol Ihe t nion 1 
Sierra N it will connect with tin- winxe 

1 
ned in) 
below the 30 ' te upraise 

from ih-- icct with 

■ 
intwil 
■ 

limbers in the joint 
drift nn the 351 
■ : on the 

the '•'■ni 
trill in mati 

on iri/. Are rv| nl Mexii an » 

■ 
Siekka Skvada. On t'i>- 3000 level 

to the rein 

ot -10 it. Son 
■ 
iln- rati .■ per week. 

■ ■ 
. and tin old M 

I ■ 

utitng In new tad 
. ited The usual amount •>( ore is be- 
I from the crop] 

I I \i 1. and Now ross, li i '1 yester- 
da) afternoon thai the connection would b 1 
iween the 2400 and 2600 levels in an hour or two. 

Alta, .-I drain ; d 

tunnel, a puin 
1 go level, and all 
for pumping out the lowei ! 

■ m hen, l he joint > lould and < 'urry 

fi on the 2500 level is in n ioft vein material, 

containin il quartz and cla) . I"hc 

makinj al i< >ui 3< 1 

11 per week. 

Goui id 1 RRl The joint Besl . id Beli her 
• .1-1 drift on the 2^o<» level was advanced < 
during the week. 

mpleted, 
1 ying the water to thi Sutro tun- 
nel are being put in. 
' \i.n oknia. T1m- tank station al the 

: i v. in- 1 nearly completed On the 
i ■] (he south drift is progressing al ihe rateol 
■ . 11 in i week. 

The west drift is being advanced al the 
■in in per week. I he winze is in low 
■ ■ 
Vki.iow |.\< kbt. The yield ot 150 ions per day 
i< kepi up, and al the same lime a pood deal of ex- 
ploring work i on at various point--. 

Co , Vi«<;i \a ['he tank nation in ihe ' . I 

1 . win Ll 1 level is about completed. 

Savage. I 'rospeeiiiiK will soon be commenced 
011 the 2600 level, when there is a large amount of 
md re id) For crosscuiting. 
Be li 1 ii.k. A considerable amount of low grade 
ore fa being extracted ani I sent to the mills. 
Belmont District. 

W'm.i "\\ CREEK.— Winnenmcca Silver State, 
I uly 21 : K II. Luther, who visited the Willow 
Creek mines a few days ago, says there is consider- 
able prospecting going on in the camp. The < Ihoate 
I in inking on their ledge and have a ver\ fine 

: ■ , 1. The Penobscot Boy, owned b) McPhetres 
-. Co., appears to be the largest gold-bearing quartz 
..in evei found on the coast. < u ts have been run 
aero ■■ 1I1 1 lead on the surface in several places, and 
gold ^1 paying quantities is found everywhere, 
I Ik lead runs through a smooth, grass covered hill, 
and the open "cuts are run throng 1 1 grass a foot high, 
tin- quart:! being from three to six feel below the sur- 
face. 

Bei.MONI 1 >KJ -.■ I in- Courier says: The Bel- 
mont Mining ' 'ompany's mill was running last week 
foi the purpose of ascertaining which of the two pro- 

■ .■■ es, ". Igamating" or "leaching" is the best and 

cheapest, and following is the result of the test: By 
thi amalgamating process, bullion produced, 847 
ounces;. 141 fine; assay value, $477.27. Bj the leach- 
ing process, bullion produced, ^30 ounces; 025 fine; 
., . .1; /alue, $633.88. 

Columbus District. 

Northern Beixr.— 7>i« Fissure,Jvfiy 21: The 

southwest drift on the fifth Shaft level has been 

extended 9 reel during the week; the total length run 
1 1 ,., fret. 'I he formation has changed ver) materi- 
ally, the face of the drift looking very favorable for 
encountering ore. In the crosscut to the south, on 
the same level, there has been no work done. The 
sto.pes on the fourth shaft level arc yielding as usual. 
The slope-, look well in the upraise above the first 
shaft level, and are showing an improvement. The 
section of the mine above the adit levels presents 
very much the same appearance as last week, except 
the seventh level, where the ore improves as the work 
on it progresses upward. Some fair grade ore is be- 
ing taken from the ninth level, also from the winze 
in. m the eleventh. The dail) yield of ore has been 
about 53 tons, which is being shipped to the mill. 
Both nulls are running steadily and doing good work. 
The bullion shipments have been $12,550.23 for the 
week ending July ioih, and aggregate $37,070.70 on 
July account lo the same date. 

Mount 1 HARLO. The stope below the third level, 
near winze No. 1, is yielding a small amount of $50 
ore. The stope west' of winze No, 2 is not looking 
so well, but is turning out considerable $50 ore. The 
Stope below the third level, near the head of winze 
No. 2 is showing some two feet of ore assaying $75 
pel ton. The. stope above the third level near the 
same winze, does not show anything of value. A 
number of car loads of $150 ore have been taken from 
a bunch beloW the third level, near winze No. 4, dur- 
ing the week. A crosscut has been run 30 feet north 
from the winze between the second and third levels. 
It is nearly north from the shaft, and has cut a ledge 
of $60 quartz that looks promising. The intermedi- 
ate stope, between the second and third levels, near- 



I) above winze So. 1, is giving a small amount of 
rich chloi 

feel t>- the north from the second level above this 
slope. Ii has cut the ledge, which 1- 
of $200 on the west 

1 the Calhson 

narrower, I 
end shows rathe it deal of 

A ship. 

taUi insiAnt, and anothi the 10U1. 

Borax, U. 

■ 

ding Soo pouni 
■■ . 
produce about ten tons oi borax per month, worth 
about $1 , are erecting siv 

i intend to add ' practi- 

and will manu- 
1 inks are in run- 
I 
1 . ing been in charge of Ihe 
1 ■ : ' \ Molim 

large ] of 1 aally from 

1 attaining sali ■ 

. ■ |gO ( : ,. 

ing haul that purpose. 

Lorks on 
1 ■ 
ground and will proba i inks and 

■ \k. Times', < tarfield and Santa I ■ 

some of the best in 1 lies mi the State, Some of those in 

Garfield having paid their wa) from the surface. 

nth, along the White mountains, are large 
mineral fit ■ innumerable ledges, from 

which poor but energetic miners can maki good 

1 .1, .id p. .in thi ir I il tor, Sam] iling mills h il 1 101 >n be 
built at two, and perhaps ihree points, and ,1 great 
deal nf monej wi 1 come rrom the districts within 
r.-.i onabte reaching disi 11 Since it has become 
supplies, new districts 
are being made, which will soon add their valuable 

Otltpttt LO the wealth and industry of this section. 

In Deep splint; Valley, within 1 short time, develop- 
ments nave been made which leave no doubt as 10 
the great value of the district, Darwin, Cerro * fordo 
and Bevciidge, fornv rlj noted districts, are again 
becoming centers ind are receiving much 

at ten lion from Arizona mining men, This is a. coun- 
try of old lime miners, who knowing the value of 

their property have staid for years, sometimes in dis- 
tress, and nearly always in straighteuedcircumstances. 
They are now to be rewarded for then faith and 
patience, as facilities for transportation and cheaper 

methods of working rock will permit them to derive 
an income from what lias been heretofore almost 
, le id property. 

Pioche District. 
Meadow V \i,i.kv.— Rec&rd, Juk 14: The two men 
working on the tunnel level have sunk on the ledge 
some 10 fi and extracted ore along it for a distance 
of 20 ft. The ore continues improving, that being ex- 
tracted will pulp $75 per ton. It is likely that at no 
distant day the company will have a good force of 
men working on thi- old' ledge that was abandoned 
in early days owing to the low grade of the ore. The 
mills have all run out of salt, and there is none to be 
had in this vicinity at present. The mill at the lower 
end of town lias been closed down for want of the 

article. There is a wagon train loaded With salt on 

the road, which is due, and liable to arrive at any 
moment. 

1 . 1.1,1 1 ,r 1 1 k . - \ 1 every blow or tlie pick this 
mine in | aekrabbit district, improves. The dead work 
having been done, the miners are engaged sinking 
the shaft. In the ledge a three-ft vein of dark-red 
ore was encountered the first of the week, and looks 
like free milling ore. It assays $96.25 in silver. The 

Kingfisher presents one of the finest prospects in 
southern Nevada. The ground is exceedingly favor- 
able for the opening of a big mine at any moment. 

Day Mine.- The work of developing the ore 
bodies in the lower workings of this mine is being 
pushed ahead as rapidly as circumstances will per- 
mit. The ore chambers look very favorable as far as 
penetrated and create great hopes in the minds of all 
who have seen them. 

A 1 IU:i.i.iiin\ ii.i.e. — The concentrating tables 
were started here running on the night of the 7th 
inst. They have been placed in excellent order and 
are doing good work. The average yield per day of 
the mill working tailings is about $140, much better 
than was expected. There were two bars cast at the 
mill on Sunday, and another 90-pound bar yesterday. 
As soon as the smelting company have completed 
working the old tailings they will be enabled to re- 
work the tailings thai have already been run through 
by a new process. So they believe. 



n*1y been taken out. The ( ilobe Silver Belt 
ore m the north drift 1 » 

I line arc 11 men al Work 111 the mine. The null is 

working »te*dil) n null at Walnut Grove 

running on full tune and bullion is streaming out. 

rior mill ...rune; m, 'I he 

Peck hoisting works are up, [. N Rodenburg ex- 
hibitsvery rich silver ore jus) n m Turkey 

creek district, it was sent him by B, T. Shaw, who 
k it from an extcnsioi e Spring mine. 

Spring mine, ..v. ned b) M< -•-]-, \ iavin 






ARIZONA. 

About Pinal City. — Pinal Drill, July 14: On 
the Nacoocha, they are timbering the shaft prepara- 
tory to sinking. The South Pioneer has 7 ft of pay 
ore in the north drift, 300 level. Twenty-one men al 
work in the mine. The mill is run steadily. Santos 
Corona is building and adobe smelling furnace and 
refinery in connection with the Queen creek water 
jacket. The- laic rains have caused a plentiful sup- 
pi) of water and a few days now will suffice to start 
die Queen creek smeher. The I tastings Co, are 
working a force of men. The Surpriser is under the 
management of ] . H. McMullen. The Eureka mine 
is constantly improving. The walls are prominent. 
The hanging wall is very smooth, the foot wall 
coarse. The supply of ore is increasing and more 
than the mill can consume. It shows large quantities 
of horn silver. Sinking and drifting on the Monarch 
of the sea. At the bottom of the shaft, ore assaying 
$5,300 has been found. They have now 20 men em- 
ployed and are preparing for operations on a grand 
scale. The owners have worked cautiously hitherto 
and the present increase is a good sign. Rain has 
fallen in many parts of the* Territory, the fall in most 
places has as yet been light, 75 tons of bullion were 
lately shipped by ox teams from the Howell reduction 
works to the A. & P. railroad. These works are on 
Lynx creek, about 12 miles southeast of Prescott. 
One hundred men are employed in the underground 
workings of the Silver King mine. Old Dominion 
shipped for the week, 71 bars— 22,840 pounds. 
Total, 3,588,275 pounds. On hand and waiting 
shipment, 318 tons. At Pine Springs, Gavin & Co. 
have a large lot of horn silver sacked ready for ship- 
ment, and up to date the mine holds its richnessand 
has widened. Il the north drift horn silver 88% pure 



1 nnd Morgan, continues to yield verj much 

1 lylor, just from the Silver Belt mine. 
says that 1 it been ins bi 1 

liiion. C. T. I ewis tells us thai the Castle creek 
smelter will u- running in .1 short lime. Gen. Mon 

g thing in lead, neat \ 
burg. The Howell reduction works are gun 

Is of 70 ions of bul- 

! I g forward to 

ind S 1 iti Fe. 

Notes, i Her, J ulj 21 ■ < icntleraen 

just fi the Belle mim 10 the 1 [dwell 

1 •'.. tell us thai on I ■ 1 aised from a depth of 

335 ft and that the mine is in line . Dnditlon, Guil- 
ihat a shipment of 35.000 

fi nm the ib.weii smel- 
ler two days ago. The mill will soon be up and 
running. 

HACKBBRKV, Mineral Park Miner, July 15: 

There are thirty-seven nun employed in the Hack- 
terry mine at present, besides seventeen in the mill. 
Fred. N'obman is sinking for water, in order to have 

enough to keep the mill running. The mine is look- 
ing well ever) where, and is being opened up 11 1 ever) 

direction under the management of F. N. Johnson. 
The report that M. Abernethy was about to resign 
his position as superintendent of the Indian Queen 

company is untrue. I. (. Sands is working in the 

null. 

EL Dok mo Canyon. The Southwestern mining 
company have a fifteen-stamp mill, dry crushing, 
with cylinder roaster attached. This mill was kept 
running last year for eight months on ore from the 
Savage and Techateioup mines, which belong to the 
company. These mines have produced some half 
million dollars in bullion since being located. The 
mill was Marled Up in April of this year, and has 
been running regularly ever since. The five-stamp 
mill belonging to the Lincoln silver mining company 
at the Canyon, has been running on custom ore, 
with good results. The Southwestern mining pom- 
pan) have about forty men employed at present, 
Many miners are at work about ll Dorado Canyon 
on their own mines, and man) others chloriding on 
the mines owned by Gillispie, Lund k Co. The in- 
tense heat of summer prevents man) mines being 
worked at the Canyon at this season, but none of 
them remain idle during the winter. 

COLORADO. 

daho Springs.— Gazette, July 14: Some of the 

finest mineral land in the State is open to propectors 
in Ute and Cascade creeks. Solid silver glance 
weighing as much as three ounces is being found in 
lloat at the head of Cascade gulch, and quartz car- 
rying sulphurets of silver that will assay $900 can be 
picked up al the head of Ute creek. The finest tim- 
ber in the State is here to be seen and the water is as 
pure as any in the world. Work is being vigorously 
pushed on the Silver Link lode near the entrance of 
Ute creek. The mineral contains galena, gray cop- 
per, and rosin zinc, and very much resembles the ore 
of the Eclipse mine. Prospectors are arriving daily 
al Bullion Camp from all quarters. Work is progress- 
ing finely on the Treasurer and Twin lodes on Ute 
creek. Elliotts placer claim is being successfully 
worked on Chicago creek. Three men are being 
worked on Treasury Vault lode, Cascade gulch. A 
large body of ore has been struck in the Silver Ring 
mine, Cascade mining district. Work will commence 
on Denmark lode, Bullion camp immediately. The 
Kitty Clyde mine presents a handsome appearance 
with its many new improvements. The plant of 
machinery for this mine wtis successfully taken in on 
Monday last. Ten and a half tons of second and 
third class ore were shipped to Black Hawk from the 
Silver Glance mine on Saturday last. Mr. Fallon is 
working his Royal Oak group of mines on Ute creek, 
and obtaining a very fine grade of mineral. Mr. 
Finch manager of the Wallace mine in Bullion camp, 
is working that property day and night. A good 
graded road is nearly completed from the mine to the 
Spring gulch road, Work is steadily being pro- 
ceeded with on the Golden Eagle lode at the head of 
Maxmillian gulch. The vein is six ft between walls, 
andcarriesa pay streak of 10 inches mineralized 
quartz on the hanging wall that mills two ounces gold 
and ten ounces silver per ton. 

IDAHO. 



Smoky Mining Items. — Ketchum Keystone, Jul; 
si : The placer mines of Little Smoky are being 
worked to advantage, and a wagon road is being 
constructed lo them from Camas Prairie. 

The Fourth 01 July. One of the first discov- 
eries in the Smoky country, shows large quantities of 
high grade ore and bids fair to develop into a rich 
mine. 

THE ALTURAS. Is being opened up by Messrs. 
Whitmer & Dithmer, It is a well defined ledge, and 
carries, in addition to good galena, some specimens 
of gray copper. 

Thi. 1 Umax. I lis being worked by a lively crew, 
and report says is the scene of a recent big strike, a 
large body of galena having been disclosed, and now 
considerable ore is being extracted. 

The Carrie Leonard. - This mine has shipped 
upwards of 60 tons of 180 ounce ore, but, until a 
wagon road is constructed to the mine or reduction 
works established on the Smoky i( is nonsense to 
take out the ore from the drifts. 

A rout Ketchum. — It is estimated that the tim- 
ber on the mountains about Ketchum is sufficient to 
supply the Wood river country for 25 years to come, 
and the supply on all tributaries to the upper Wood 
river is exhaus'dess. Some beautiful specimens of 
float galena ore brought in by Trailcreek prospectors 
and the discovered ledges in that locality show flat- 
tering indications. It is rumored that an immense 
galena discovery has recently been made on the East 
Fork of the Salmon. It is said that the lucky strike 
consists of 15 ft square, as far as uncovered, of solid 
galena. 

Lively at Alanta.— Atlanta is enjoying quite a 



boom in a small way. There are probab 
at wink in town .mil iii the immediate vicioit) . two 
nulls ol ao sruiiji- 1 n ii ,,r.- going tip and □ gi iodd< 1 
of building is going on. [Tie Monnn h mine is show 
ing up splendidly. From the surface to die 200 level 

1 St. 400.000 of first-class ore. 1,000 

tons .>f which sold in ( Imaha for $1,000 per ton, Al 

1 addition to the re reserves in 

the upper levels, there is a large bod) ol ore in the 

lower levels. 

Big Mink.— Ilailey Times, July 14: A ledge 
near Vienna, over which .1 trail has been 1 

without an) ■ ' f< und until re- 

cently, has developed into a bonanza, Mr. Childs, 

having noticed the ithi surface, which by ever) 

on-- else was regarded as float, took .1 careful look a) 
ind it to I "■ ore in place, and --.-t lt gang ol 
m aei al work upon il V Few da) ■■ since tin 
opened up here a lode ;\ ft across, all ore assaying 
into the hundreds. This is the biggest ore 

v. here since the < uster mine 
was disc 1 

MONTANA. 

The I 1 KINGTON. Butte later- Mountain, July 
18 The affairs ot the i . continue in the 

same satisfactory condition that has characterized 
them since the present management look hold of the 
enterprise. An inquiry as to the workings of the 
mine and the outlook of the property was aiei b) a 
courteous invitation from Manager Medhursi to lei 

the product of the mine for the past six months 
speak. In compliance with his suggestion the Into - 
Mountain is enabled to state tlmt on July 1st a divi- 
dend ol 1,100,000 francs was a id in 1 ris to the 
Stockholders, The product of this property from 
January 1st lo Jul)' Ist . ^83. was $638,548; which 
would betoken that the Lexington Co. have a valu- 
able hole in the ground, and that Butte is not quite 
dead yet. TWO salt batteries of five stamps each 
have been erected in the mill, one of which was 
started up a few days ago, and the oilier will be sel 

in motion probably before the end of the week. k. 
W. Noble brought 96 ounces of gold into Virginia 
City last week, the product of a run of ore from a 
mine on Wisconsin creek in which he is interested. 
Placer diggings have been discovered with in .1 shun 
distance of Billings and several claims are alread) 
located. It is said to be pay dirt. About to tons ol 
ore per day are now taken out Of ( lark's fraction by 
Onl) six men. Assays of ihe rock show it to carry 
between '*> and 70 ounces of silver. 

NEW MEXICO. 

Kingston. Tribune, July 121I1: The two smel- 
ters at Copper City will blow in soon. All the White 

Oaks mines are reported as producing finely. The 
rich ore in the Bear mountain mines still holds out. 

The Old Man mine, Bear mountain, has been sur- 
veyed for a paten 1. The Southwestern M. Co., ol 
Topeka. will erect machinery at their mines neaj 
Chloride. The Myrtle mine, Central City district, is 
looking exceedingly well for the amount of work done. 
The Cariboo mine at Fleming is now developed by 
an 80-ft shaft and is producing high grade ore. The 
ore produced by the Silver Bear mine, Mogollon 
mountains, is becoming richer as depth is attained. 
Two hundred sacks of ore weighing 10 tons have 
been shipped from the Silver Monument mine, near 
Chloride, to the Argo works at Denver. A five ft 
breast of rich ore has been struck in the I -asl < nance 
mine at Pyramid. This mine makes a regular ship- 
ment of a carload of ore per day. The mines of the 
Sandias are reported showing up splendidly. The 
Bullion mine at Kingston is looking better than ever 
and high grade silver ore is being extracted. It is 
reported that a force of of 20 men are at work, night 
and day, on the Little Mac mine. While < taks dis- 
trict, and are taking out a large amount of high 
grade ore. The work of surveying the Buffoni 
mine, Chloride district, for a patent, was completed 
last week, and work has been resumed in the shaft. 
The opening is now 227 ft deep, and is nicely lim- 
bered from top to bottom. The vein shows an ore 
streak of solid metal that runs $225 in silver and $50 
in copper. 

OREGON. 

Copper King.- -Oregonian, July 20: The Cop- 
per King copper mine of Baker county, is to be de- 
veloped by Captain Hoatsen, late of the Lake Su- 
perior mines. He has gone over the claims and re- 
ports them of great value providing the veins run 
true. Lake Superior mining parties agree to pay 
$100,000 for a 'fifth interest in case the mines promise 
as well on later investigation. 

ECLENSBWtG'. — Localizer: We saw a nice sam- 
ple of what is said to be genuine anthracite coal, 
Upon inquiring we learned that the discovery \yas 
made by Wm. Packwood; that it is located on the 
west slope of the Cascade mountains in the Pack- 
wood pass, and that it is r8 to 23 ft wide and many 
acres in extent. We believe this is the first discover)' 
of that particular kind of coal in the Territory. 



UTAH. 

Park City.— Salt Lake Tribune, July 20: A 
piece of galena and carbonate ore weighing 400 lbs. 

lias been taken from one of die mines at this place. 
In Thayne's canyon, there is unusual activity in 
building improvements and prospecting. The < loun- 
cil Bluffs Company, is now engaged in getting out 
timber for a boarding house, and from present 
indications the company is liable to continue work 
on their mines through the winter. 

Copper Gulch.— J. M. Burke and others are 
developing the Creedmoor, Magnolia and Gallanip- 
per, near Frisco. Sixteen men arc employed, one- 
half being on the Creedmoor. In this property a 
good vein of ore was struck, which, in places, is six 
feet wide, the ore going 60 per cent lead, and 20 
ounces silver. At present the head of the drift is in 
a fault or barren ground, but it is hoped soon to find 
the body ofore.^ Frisco is a very quiet town jusl 
now , while matters at Copper Gulch are more lively. 
The Cactus ( 'ompany made a test run yesterday ot 
their concentrators, which promises to prove success- 
fid. The ('actus has an immense ore body, and if 
this can be concentrated and worked cheaply, Cop- 
per ( hileh will soon become a lively camp. A large 
force of men are employed pulling up boarding 
houses and other buildings around the Cactus and 
Comet mines, 



56 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 28, 1883 






..jGllN'T TFIOi i 



A. T. DEWEY 



\V. B. EWER. 



DEWEY & CO., Publishers. 



Office 252 Market St., N. E. comer Front St. 
£3T Take the Elevator, JVo. IS Front St. ^ 



W. B. EWER Senior Editop. 



Address editorials and business letters to the firm; 
individuals are liable to be absent. 



Subscription and Advertising Rates. 

Si'bscriptions— Six months, §2.25 1 year, $4, payable 
in advance. 
Advkktisinc Rates. 1 week. 1 month, 3 mos. 12 mos 

Per line( agate) 25 .80 §2.20 $5.00 

Half inch (1 square).. Sl-50 84.00 10.00 24.00 

One inch 2.00 5.00 14.00 45.00 

Large advertise mens at favorable rates. Special o r read- 
ing notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing in ex- 
traordinary type or in particular parts of the paper, at 
specia! rates. Four insertions are rated in a month 



Our latest forms go to press on Thursday evening. 



Entered at S. F. Post Office as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. 
DEWEY & CO., Patent Solicitors. 

A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWER. G. H. STRONG. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday Morning, July 28, 1S83. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS.— Treating Gold -Bearing Clays; Min- 
ing Improvements; Prevention of Mining Accidents, 
50. Passing Events; End Lines of Mining Claims; 
Ores of Nickel; Locating too Much Surfaee Ground; 
Blowpipe Lead Assays, 57. Blasting in Mines— No. 1; 
Foundry Notes; Pacific Coast Inventions, 58. 

ILLOSTRATIONS.-Combined Cradle and Puddling 
Machine for Auriferous Clays, 50. Different Methods 
of Boring lor Blasts, 58. 

CORRESPONDENCE.— Letter from New Mexico. 
50. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS-The Needed Bran 
Compressor; How Screws are Threaded; Nails in the 
Days of our Grandfathers; American vs. English Nails; 
Spiegcleisen; Steel Nails; Locomotives from Europe; 
Itolling Liquid Iron, 51. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.-Scicnce and Progress; 
A Submarine Observatory; Wine Ferments; The Stor- 
age Battery; What is Carbon; Human Hair Under the 
Microscope; Photographic Speech, 51. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.-Sales at the San 
Francisco Stock Board, Notices of Meetings, Assess- 
ments, Dividends and Bullion Shipments, 52. 

MINING SUMMARY-Froui the various counties 
of California, Nevada, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New 
Mexico, Oregon and Utah, 52-3. 

THE ENGINEER— The "Bared Right Arm;" Pro- 
gress of the Telegraph, 55. 

USEFUL INFORMATION. -Important Experi- 
ment; To Keep Tires on Wheels; Storing Grain; Decay 
of Stone; For Polishing Brass Instruments; The Com- 
pounds of Gold; Bessemer Steel; To Render Musty 
Grain Sweet, 55. 

GOOD HEALTH.— Verv Hot Water for Consump- 
tion; The Electric Light on the Eyes: A Singular Case 
of Bleeding, 55. 

NEWS IN BRIEF-On page 60 and other pages. 

MISCELLANEOUS.- The Boss Copper Smelters; 
Our Local Industries; Carelessness in Mining and As- 
sorting Ores, 50. Electric Light for the Southern Ex- 
position Building; A New Use for Mica; Boom Towns in 
Montana; Inspecting and Marking the Boundary Lines; 
Too Many Claims and too Little Work, 54. 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Globe Iron Works— John Caine, Stockton, Cat. 



Passing Events. 

The mining situation in different parts of the 
country seems to be very favorable, judging 
from the reports in the local press. In nearly 
all sections developments are being pushed 
ahead with confidence. Prospectors are busy 
at their summer's work, and though we have 
heard of no wonderful strikes this season, or the 
establishment of new and important districts, 
yet many new mines have been found. 

We note elsewhere the preparations for the 
establishment at the local rolling mills of exten- 
sive steel works, which is an important indus- 
trial advance on this coast. 

The telegraphers' strike is the topic of the 
town, and thus far it still continues. 

Extensive preparations are being made 
throughout the city for the reception of many 
visitors to the Triennial Conclave next month. 
It may be that some of these visitors will take 
more or less interest in our mining industry, 
find visit our mining regions. 



Leaijville has now six smelters, whose com- 
bined capacity is 775 tons of ore a day. It has 
also two stamp mills of a capacity of SO stamps. 
Over 800 tons of ore per day are thus used in 
Leadville, while about 450 tons are shipped to 
other points. The total output for the year 
1S8-2 of the Leadville district was $17^181,853, 
and it is expected that the yield of the present 
year will be still greater. 

The Lake -Superior (Mich) mines report a 
product of 2,048 tons copper for June. 



End Lines of Mining Claims. 

No more perplexing questions ever arise in 
mining litigation than those connected with 
"end lines." .Section 2320 of the Revised 
.Statutes provides that "end lines of each claim 
shall be parallel to each other/' This seems a 
very simple proposition, yet many unforseen 
difficulties have arisen, which would occupy 
too much space to detail, but to which we have 
before referred, as the circumstances arose. 
Now, however, comes the Secretary of the In- 
terior, and declares that the statutory direc 
tion that the end lines of a lode claim must be 
parallel, should be followed, as a rule, hut, under 
certain peculiar circumstances, an exception to 
the rule may be allowed. If this ruling had 
been hi existence some time since it would have 
saved endless trouble. 

Some consideration of this subject will be of in- 
terest to all miners. It will be remembered in the 
case in the United States Circuit Court, District 
of Nevada, of the Eureka Consolidated Mining 
Co. vs. the Richmond Mining Co., objection 
was made to the validity of certain patents, be- 
cause of non-compliance with the provision 
aforesaid. It was, however, held that "the 
provision of the statute of 1S72 (incorporated 
into Sec. 2320 aforesaid), requiring the lines of 
each claim to be parallel to each other, is merely 
directory, and no consequence is attached to a 
deviation from its direction." 

It was further held that " the defect alleged 
did not concern the defendant, and no one but 
the Government had a right to complain." 

In reviewing the case, on appeal to the Su- 
preme Court, the question as to whether the 
statute was directory only, does not seem to 
have been specially considered. The patents 
were, however, sustained ; and the court said : 
"Upon the face of the patents the United 
States has granted to the Eureka the right to 
all veins, lodes, and deposits, the tops or apexes 
of which lie on the inside of its surveys as pat- 
ented, throughout their entire depth, and 
wherever they may go, provided it keeps itself 
within the end lines of the survey. The find- 
ing that the ground in dispute is within the 
end lines, and that the apex is within the sur- 
face lines settles the rights of parties between 
themselves as well under their patents as under 
their compromise agreement." 

The case which brought forward the ruling of 
the Secretary of the Interior to which we are 
referring was one arising in New Mexico. It 
seems the Commissioner of the (ieneral Land 
Office directed the Surveyor-! Ieneral of that 
Territory to amend a survey of a mining claim 
because " the broken and parallel end lines of 
the claims aforesaid do not afford a substantial 
compliance with the law." The matter was 
brought before the Secretary of the Interior, 
who made the ruling referred to. 

It should be stated why the Secretary made 
an exception in this case. Although in the ease 
of the Eureka Consolidated vs. the Richmond 
Consolidated mining companies the statute was 
held by the Circuit court to be directory only, 
and the ruling was not disaffirmed on appeal, 
the Secretary thinks that the statutory question 
should, as' a rule, be followed; and he ap- 
proves fully of the Land Commissioner's prac- 
tice of requiring surveys to conform to the 
direction. The reasons he gives for making the 
exception in this instance are as follows: 

There are no conflicting interests, and the 
question is one between the claimants and the 
government. 

The facts show that the claims are located in 
a section of the country subject to Indian dep- 
redations. Two serveys have already been 
made, at great expense and under great diffi- 
culties, guards being required to protect the 
surveyors from hostile Indians. The last sur- 
vey has been approved by the Surveyor Gen- 
eral, and it seems to be correct in all respects 
except as to the broken parallel end lines. It 
is also reported that the peculiar topography of 
the country required these variations to enable 
a proper survey of the claim to be made. A 
further survey would now be attended with 
even greater expense and more hazard, on ac- 
count of the renewed violence of the unfriendly 
Indians. 

The interests of the claimant, who has already 
been put to large expense, and who seems to 
have acted in the utmost good faith, seem to 
require speedy action in order to protect him 
from loss. 

Under these peculiar circumstances, the Sec- 
retary of the Interior directed the Commissioner 
of the General Land Office to approve the sur- 
vey submitted, notwithstanding the fact that 
the end lines were not shown to be parallel. 



Ores of Nickel. 

Of the ores of nickel, the most important and 
those from which the nickel of commerce is 
is largely obtained, are kupferniekel and nickel 
speiss, while the other more important of its 
ores are nickeliferous pyrites, nickel glance, 
arsenical nickel, etc. The ores of nickel occur 
in most parts of the world where other metal- 
liferous deposits exist in more or less small 
quantities, but the most abundant supplies are 
found chiefly in Norway, Sweden, Hungary and 
South America. 

Kupferniekel — false copper or copper nickel — 
is an arsenide of nickel constituting the princi- 
pal ore of the metal. It occurs as a coppery- 
red, opaque, brittle body, sometimes crystallized 
in hexagonal forms; at others, in massive reui- 
form, columnar " or arborescent forms. Its 
specific gravity varies between 7.3 and 7.5, and 
its hardness is 5.5. Its streak is pale brownish 
red; it exhibits a metallic luster, and exhibits 
a gray or blackish color when tarnished. 

Analyses of this mineral show it to contain 
from 35 to 45 per cent of nickel, the residue 
being chiefly arsenic, with only small propor- 
tions of sulphur, iron, etc., but occasionally 
antimony is present in not inconsiderable 
amount. This mineral occurs in Bohemia, 
Thuringia, Hesse, Styria, Saxony, Norway , West- 
phalia, Hungary, France, Cornwall, Connecti- 
cut, etc. , usually associated with ores of cobalt, 
copper or silver ; and occurring in gneiss, mica 
slate, clay slate, quartz, syenite, etc. Other 
arsenides of nickel occurring native are Cloan- 
thite, Pammelsbergite, etc. 

Nickeliferous pyrites, or capillary pyrites, is 
a native sulphide of nickel, which occurs in a 
brassy yellow, brittle, opaque solid, having a 
metallic luster, with a hardness of from 3 to 3.5, 
and often occurring in rhombohedral crystals, 
although most frequently occurring in strings 
or threads, along with other minerals. It is 
found in Bohemia, Przibram, Andresberg, Corn- 
wall, and in Pennsylvania. 

Nickel glance is a silver white or steel gray 
brittle mineral with a metallic luster, a grayish 
black streak, and a hardness of 5 to 5.5. It oc- 
curs massive, or crystalized, hi monometric or 
cubic forms. It varies much in composition, 
but contains usually from twenty- live to thirty 
per cent of nickel, with from forty to forty-five 
per cent of arsenic, and from fifteen to twenty 
per cent of sulphur, while other varieties con- 
tain from forty to fifty per cent of antimony, 
and smaller proportions of arsenic. It occurs in 
Sweden, Westphalia, Thuringia, Hartz, Styria, 
Hungary, etc. Amongst other minerals con- 
taining nickel in large proportion may be noted 
millerite, a native nickelous sulphide; emerald 
nickel, a native nickelous hydrocarbonate; an- 
nabergite, or nickel bloom, is an arseniate of 
nickel. 



Locating too Much Surface Ground. 

When a man locates a lode mining claim un- 
der the United States mining laws, he is allowed 
to take up 1 ,500 feet along the vein and 300 feet 
on each side. His location is, therefore, 1,500 
by 300 feet. To this he is entitled. A man may 
take up more on each side than he is entitled 
to, by mistake, or mismeasurement, but he can- 
not hold it if the mistake is discovered, and 
others may lawfully locate the excess as side- 
ground to other lodes. A ruling has just been 
made by the Secretary of the Interior to the 
effect that the taking up of more width of 
surface ground for a mining claim than is allowed 
by law does not invalidate the location, and the 
monument stakes may be moved to cast off 
the excess. 

This was in the case of a mine in Tombstone, 
Arizona, where one of the objections raised to 
granting the patent was that the original loca- 
tion was found by the examination preliminary 
to survey on the ground to be more than 600 
feet in width, and the claim was so reduced as 
to cast off the excess. 

The Secretary says: "It can scarcely be 
seriously urged that such a correction of lines 
to bring them within legal restrictions should 
be held to invalidate the original location, any 
more than a settlement claim of pre-emption 
could be held invalid because by mistake the 
settler at the first had mistakenly embraced in 
his filing a larger area than 100 acres. The rule 
has always prevailed to the effect that he may 
reduce his claim by proper amendment to in- 
clude the legal area. So, also, of homestead 
entries " 



Blowpipe Lead Assay. 

Lead is extracted from its matrix by fusing 
the finely powdered mineral with metallic iron 
and a fluxing and reduciug agent iu a small 
crucible placed in the charcoal melting furnace. 
The earthy matters and non-reducible oxides 
and sulphides are slagged off, and a button of 
metallic lead will be formed in the bottom of 
the crucible. The assay of lead by fire is always 
attended with a heavy loss, as lead volatilizes 
readily when strongly heated, and portions are 
also liable to be carried ofl' in the slag. 

Fire assays of lead ores, when compared with 
the results obtained by humid analysis, gener- 
ally show a loss varying from five to twelve 
per cent. The fire assay, however, repre- 
sents what is produced by smelting lead ores on 
a large scale, and it is therefore of great com- 
mercial use. For the class containing galena, 
and all lead ores containing either arsenic, phos- 
phorus or sulphur, Mr. (leorge Attwood, in his 
"Practical Blowpipe Assaying, "gives thefollow- 
ing simple method of assay: 

Take of the finely crushed ore two grains, and 
mix with three grains of dry carbonate of soda, 
0.5 grains of borax glass, 0.5 grains powdered 
charcoal, and one grain cyanide of potassium. 
In a small fire clay crucible place two small 
pieces of wrought iron, about the thickness 
and length of a small 'steel pen, and then pour 
in the assay; cover the aasay with about four 
grains of common salt but allow the ends of the 
iron pieces to project above the assay charge; 
put on the cover of the charcoal furnace, (blow- 
pipe described recently in the Press) and screw 
the tightening-pin; apply a reducing flame 
through the opening made in the furnace, but 
apply it first in a downward direction, so that 
the flame does not attack the bottom of the 
crucible. After a few minutes blowing the 
assay commences to boil, and the furnace will 
be found to be at a good red heat. Do not in- 
crease the heat until, by a glance through the 
hole in the top of the furnace, the assay is found 
to be thoroughly fused; then increase the heat, 
and with a pair of iron pliers extract the pieces 
of iron, one by one, whilst the assay is in a 
thorough state of fusion. After the iron has 
been taken away, allow tin- assay to cool 
slowly. 

When cool, break the crucible between two 
pieces of paper on the steel anvil, and clean the 
lead button and weigh; examine the slag with 
a lens, and if any globules of lead are found add 
them to the larger button. If numerous small 
globules are found in the slag the assay should 
be repeated. This assay only takes about eight 
minutes, and if carefully made it will agree 
closely witli fire assays made on a large scale. 
The lead button frequently contains a large 
amount of copper. This can be ascertained by 
dissolving the lead with boracic acid in a deep 
bore on charcoal and deducting the weight of 
the copper found from that already considered 
to be lead. Lead nearly always contains silver, 
and also gold, therefore the button should be 
tested for both these substances. 

There is another class which comprises ;ill 
ores of load and plumbiferous substinces which 
arefree from sulphur and arsenic, or contain only 
traces of the latter. Litharge, carbonate of lead 
and minium are the chief substances which come 
under this class. To assay ores of this clans, 
mix the finely powdered material with i 
grains of carbonate of soda and one grain of argol, 
and 0.5 grams of borax glass. Place the mix- 
ture in a small crucible, and after covering with 
three to four pounds of common salt, fuse and 
treat in a similar manner to ores of the class he- 
fore described. 



Is the old Pel Monte workings at Aurora, Es- 
meralda county, Nev., at a depth of 100 feet, 
two deserted tunnels intersect, and a strong 
draft, meeting at the said point of intersection, 
lowers the temperature beyond the freezing 
point. There is quite a seepage of water from 
the upper workings, and as fast as it drops 
through, at all seasons of the year, ice forms. 



A. T. Dk\VEY, of this office, lias recently re 
turned, with his family, to Oakland, after a 
much enjoyed recreation trip of four weeks in 
Sonoma, Lake and Napa counties. Friends met 
by them will please accept grateful thanks for 
many kind favors extended. 



Wood Rives and Salmon river continue their 
favorable reports, and Butte speaks for itself 
in its immense weekly output of ore and bullion, 



July 28, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



Blasting in Mines— No. 1. 

In blasting, the oxij machine labor 

render it Impracticable tn follow closely the 
principles sjrhi ■ ■ ">> nt labor 

I, In hand boring, economy is 
gsinud by reducing to a minimum the nuna 
berol bole* and the quantity of the explosive 

lired Bat in machine 
.ruin. in ingot mainly in the reduc 

tion of tii«' time needed to accomplish the driv 

ina. Attempts have beei ide t" assimilate 

■ adopted 
I lab ir, bat the result - have not been 
■ hi tin- contrary, the conditions 
determin and the direction oi 

to tli.- production of the 
I useful effect have been 
wholly ignored in favor ■•( 
which determine the most rapid 

boring. Thin system bae ' n at* 

tended with more satisfactory results. 
Another system, pnrtfking of both 
tin 1 i'» pi ed, ami 

hitherto the best remU 
obtained from tbia, which maj 

■ en con- 
victing conditions Thus we nave 
tin.. in- machine 

boring; one in which a single ma 
pport capable 
ildjng it in any position, so a- to 
be abl and in 

n hich the holes an- pl.t. ed i i ding 

t.» the lines ol leas! resistance, as in 
hand boring. A second, in which bo^ 
era! ma< fixed a] on a hi 

allowing lint little lateral 
or angular motion, and in which the hole an 
placed at regular intervals apart, and bored 
parallel, or nearly parallel, with the axis of the 
..itiwii, irrespective "f the varying nature 
of the rock, and the lines of least resistance. 
Ami a third, in which it is sought, by the em- 
ployment of one, two, or at most three ma- 
chines, up. >ii ;i simple and light support allow- 
ing the position and direction of the machine 
to he readily changed, to satisfy, in some de- 
gree, the two sets of conditions determining the 
two former systems, by placing tin- shot holes 
us far in accordance with the lines of least re- 
sistance as the exigencies of a fairly rapid 
handling of the machine will allow. 

In executing the boring, itis very necessary to 
keep the holes free from debris. Bits must be 
chosen to suit the rock ami the hole kept well 
supplied with water. The absolute number of 
holes required in any case will, of course, de- 
pend upon the tenacity of the rock and the de- 
velopment of the jointing planes, and also, in 
some ilegrec, by the lines of fracture due to the 
preceding blast. The same circumstances will 
determine the distribution of the holes. Leav- 
ing minor variations out of account, however, 
the same distribution will be adhered to 
throughout the driving. The manner of dis- 
tributing the holes over the face of the heading 
may be varied according to the judgment of the 
engineer in charge; that is, the general fea- 
tures of the distribution to be adopted, may 
be chosen to suit the requirements of the 
machines and their supports. Also, it should 
be noted that one method of distributing the 
shot-holes will require a less number of them 
than another. Some samples arc shown in the 
engravings, which are from ' 'Andre's Coal Min- 
ing." Fig. 1 represents the heading of the Mt. 
( enis tunnel. Fig. 2, the Gosohenen end of the 
St. (Jothard tunnel. Fig. 3, the Airolo end of 
the same tunnel. Fig. 4 represents the face of 
a stone drift driven at Marihaye. Fig. 5, a 
similar drift at An/.in, and Fig. 6.a drift of the 
same character at Ronchamp, the latter three 
examples being typical of the distribution 
adopted in the French collieries. 

The Leach inc! Process Wins. — The Belmont 

Courier says: "The Belmont Mining Company's 
mill was running last week for the purpose of 
ascertaining which of the two processes, namely, 
"amalgamating" or "leaching," is the best and 
cheapest. Following ia the result of the test: 
By the amalgamating process — bullion pro- 
duced, 837 ounces; 441 fine; assay value, 
§477.-5. By the leaching process— bullion pro- 
duced, 530 ounces; 925 fine; assay value, 
N033.SS. ^Ulie conclusion is, therefore, arrived at 
that theleaehingplanis thebest. In the adoption 
of this method we seem in fact to be to some ex- 
tent working back along the line of the Creator's 
movement." 



Foundry Notes. 

Some very important improvement* ir. 
shortly I Rolling Mills, 

l-y which tiny will l« able, hereafter to make 

ii iteeL Mi. Noble, the Superintendent, 
otly returned from the Ksst, where he 
d studying up she subject ol the Sie- 
mens Mirtin process for 
steel. A complete plant of a capacity of thirty 

tons per .lay <. put up, ami 

tiitns are now being made for this addition to 
the mill. Most of the machinery will be made 
Ihim-, though some of it will • 
Rast, A fine Worthington Duplex pomp has 
drauHc accumulator, 
to work the machinery oi the melting house. 



Pacific Coast lu mentions. 

The Minikii i mi- I'uv-- Patent 

■ ■■■!!■ .■ 1 >i l foi >i>m.' 

years— tin- largo majority of all the 
issued by the government to Pacific COS . 
<. ._-iit"i & The business, how ever, is by no 
onfined to ( , 

for foreigners 
and inventors in Eastern i t which 

..in weekly Dewey 

Patent Agenc 
many years that the managers havi 

ith the needs of our 
inventory an. I an- thoroughly familiar with the 
■ ml requin mi Patent ' tffice, 

nit, they bai 




Primitive Bullion Makers. 

I arastra and Chile mill for crushing 

rude in cc ad really "primitivi 

their work well, hot do it slowly as con 
with machine) a date. W bile we 

have not d< 
ild a^ might b 
posed, i 

when- a Few men work their own mini 
arastra still holds its oa ii, i 
perfected to entirely displace it. A m 

ces, n ill 
turn out in.. ay a profitable dollar, h 
quartz mill with engine would entail failure. 
Of i peak ol small minin 

In tin ir old 

i ■ nace has its 
merits also. W e recently de ■ 
iln It differs 

much, of co 

■ 
Line in both. It ia sim- 
ply the production of lead bullion 
carrying sil\ er, the bullion in tin cae 

afterwards n fined, or t lie silver 

■ ioin the lead In a reverber itor; 
ad the Litharge kept 

on hand Foi ■ ■ Lin with each 

lot of ore to be smelted. By this 
can do without 

the large proportitn of lead or 

n thi casi of fur- 

capacit^ . w I" i e refining 

"iilion is not practiced. ( 'ne oi 

these adobe furnaces now running at 
Silver City, New Mexico, is said by a local co- 
temporary to be producing silvi I tine. The 

two furnaces, both smelting and refining, are 
constructed of common adobes and much after 
the manner of the ordinary old-style brick 
concerns, that were in use until the water- 
jacket supplanted them. Of course, the me- 
chanical construction is miserable, and the 
blast is furnished by a common Large-sizfed bel- 
lows, while the surroundings are not of a kind 
such as one might see in more modern establish- 
ments. The silver is produced, nevertheless, 
and at a cost much below that which would be 
incurred by combined shipping and treating 
rates, were the ore sent elsewhere. Conversing 
with the man at the bead of the concern, it was 
Learned that tin- average charge was about 300 
pounds, 100 pounds consisting of lithargi and 
the balance of raw ore. One charge is usually 
smelted a night, while the furnace is in blast, 
ami the manager states that to work night and 
day for a week, about 4,000 pounds of material 
could be run through, at a cost of about S70, or 
$35 per ton. The slag from the blast furnace 
contains about $5 per ton. 

With a little "adobe" a lot Of ore can be 

smelted as soon as produced Erom the mine, and 
the hand-to-mouth principle of thepocket mines 
is repeated. The trouble of handling ore in 
bulk is saved ami the ore is made to yield its 
contents as soon as it comes from the mine. 
The adobe smelter is by no means to be despised 
despite its antiquity ami crndeness of construc- 
tion. 



It has two fourteen-inch high pressure cylinders; 

two twenty-inch low pressure cylinders, and a 
six and a half inch water cylinder. 

It is proposed to make Hue steel and build up a 
market for it on this coast, Steel will be made 
for forgings, shafting, structural shapes and 
rails. 

No steel has" been yet made on thin coast. 
The mills have been rolling steel brought from 
England for the last three years, but they will 
now make their own. The new tariff now 
shuts out most of the English steel, and the 
majority of what we use conies from the East. 

The rolling mills are quite busy at preseut, 
and employing from 750 to S0O men steadily. 
They are working largely in manufacturing 
goods. They have just finished the job of the 
material for the Market street cable road, and 
now have the contract for the material for the 
Sutter street road. We shall give some further 
details of the new steel works at the rolling 
mills in a short time. 



Fig. G. 
OF BORING FOR BLASTS. 
obtaining patents, a fact whi 



entors 



San Luis Obispo is to build a big hotel. 



recognize. 

Within the past few years the number of t in- 
ventors has greatly increased in the Pacific 
States and Territories. The exigencies to be 
met in comparatively new or isolated regions 
seem to sharpen men's wits, and when difficul- 
ties are encountered they arc apt to he met \<\ 
the individual without the usual dependence be- 
ing placed on others. This has fostered inven- 
tion in manyhranch.es. Moreover/new industries 
have arisen among us which needed appliances of 
a peculiar nature. In advice and assistance, 
Dewey & Co.'s Patent Agency has been of great 
service to these inventors, preparing their pa- 
pers, informing them of the state of the art, 
and smoothing out difficulties, which their ex- 
perience has enabled them to do. As a conse- 
quence, there has been a gradual increase of 
patronage from year to year, as is evidenced by 
the increased list of patents granted to Pacific 
Coast inventors. 

The strike of telegraph operators continues. 



Thunderinii Dows the Mountain. — In 
widening the trail up Mount Scowden, a few 
days since, it became necessary to Mast away a 
disjointed mass of granite forty feet long and 
twenty feet high. A charge of giant powder 

having been placed behind it and fired, the great 
block, weighing some 200,000 pounds, was 
toppled over into the smooth rocky bed of a steep 
ravine, leading down the side of the mountain 
2,000 feet. Sliding down this smooth channel, 
the liii'j'n mass acquired at once a fearful veloc- 
ity, and leaping more than a hundred feet at a 
bound, threw off gnat fragments that whirled 
through the air like a shower of cannon balls, 
one piece, weighing over a ton, striking at the 
base of the mountain and leaping clear across 
Mill creek, and burying itself deeply in the op- 
posite bank. The miners in the neighborhood, 
startled by the concussion, suppose. t for a time 
that an earthquake had occurred. 



Tin. Ilomestake Mining Company, of Dakota, 
has declared its regular monthly dividend of 
40 cents per share, or $50,000, payable at New 
York. This makes ©350,000 this year, and 
$2,112,500 since the commencement. 



The gross bullion product 
mine for June was 851,400. 



'f the Tombstone 



58 



;ining and Scientific Pri 



JULY 



1883 



[metallurg y and Ores . 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

No. 23 STEVENSON STREET, 

Near First and Market Streets, S. P. 

Established, 1869. C. A. Lookhardt, Manager. 

OreB Worked by any Process. 
Ores Sampled. 
Assaying in all its Branches. 
Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Waters, Etc 
Working Tests (Practical) Made. 
Plans and Specifications famished for the 
most suitable process for working Ores. 

Special attention paid to Examinations of 
Mines, plans and reports furnished. 

C. A. LTJCKHARDT & CO, 
(Formerly Huhu & Luckhardt.) 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgists 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO 

IMPORTBRS OF AND DEALBRS IN 

Assayers' Materials, 

MINE and MILL SUPPLIES, 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS AND CHEMICALS, DRUG- 
GISTS' GLASSWARE AND SUNDRIES, Etc 

118 and 120 Market Street, and 15 and 17 
California St., San Francisco. 

We would call the attention of Assayers, Chemiata, 
Mining Companies, Milling Companies, Prospectors, etc., 
to our full stock of Balances, Furnaces, Muffles, Cruci- 
bles, Scorifiers, etc., including, also, a full stock of 
Chemicals. 

Having been engaged in furnishing these supplies since 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast, we feel 
confident from our experience we can well suit the de- 
mand for th ese goods both as to quality and price. Our 
Mew Illustrated Catalogue, with prices, will be sent on 
application. 

43TOur Gold and Silver Tables, showing the value per 
ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and valuable 
tables for computation of assays in grains and grammes, 
will be sent free upon application. Agents tor the Patent 
Plumbago Crucible Co., London, England. 

JOHN TAYIiOE & CO. 



Q. BD8TBL. 



H. SU8TBL 



«JL, metallurgical works, 

P\- 318 Pine St., (Basement), 

Corner of Leldeadorff Street, - SAN FRANCISCO 

Ores Sampled and Assayed, and Tests Made by any 
Process. 
Assaying and Analysis of Ores, Minerals and Waters. 
Mines examined and reported on. 
Piactical Instruction given In Treating Ores by ap- 
proved processes. 

Q. KTJSTEL & CO.. 
Mining Engineers and Metallurgist 

OTTOKAR HOFMANN, 

Metallurgist and Mining Engineer. 

Erection of Leaching and Chlorination Works a 
specialty. Address, 

Cor. Fifth and Bryant Sts., 

SAN FBANCISCO, CAL. 



WM. D JOHNSTON, 
ASSAYER AND ANALYTICAL CHEMIST, 

113 Leidesdorff Street, 

Bet. California and Sacrameno Ssti, SAN FRANCISCO 

ASSAYING TAUGHT. 

JWPereonal attention insures Correct Returns. "£& 



THOS. PRICE'S 

Office and Chemical 
Laboratorv, 

624 Sacramento St.. S. F. 



EDWARD BOOTH, 

Chemist and Assaver, 

No. 110 Sutter St., S. F. 



it 



CLAYTON" 

(IJtea IMPROVED.a 




AIR COMPRESSORS 

For CATALOGUES, ESTIMATES, Etc Address, 

CLAYTON STEAM PUMP WORKS 
io &t: York st., BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

(Near Approach to New York & Brooklyn Bridge. ) 



Correspondence is cordially solicited from reliable 
sources upon all topics of interest and value to our readers. 



INGERSOLL ROCK DRILLS 




Mining Machinery. 

For Catalogues, Estimates, Etc., address 

Berry & Place Machine Company, 

PARKE & LACY, Proprietors.] 

8 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Established 1864. 



THE MOREY & SPERRY MINING MACHINERY CO., 




I Sachet sors ^o MOSEY & SPiURR Y J 

Manufacturers of allkindsof- 



Mine and Mill Machinery 



WARBKOOMS : 

4 94 Liberty St., New York. 



WOBKS: 

Newburg, - New York. 



make from the meat improved Patterns QTJAJlTi! ajd NCAIW.P MILLS comi'leie, . 
working GOLD and SILVER ORES. 



Mm IMPROVED PULVERIZER, 

For WET or DRY Cru-hlng. 

SIMPLE, EFFICIENT and DURABLE 



MOREY'S IMPROVED PULVERIZER. 

H teel SHOES and DIES fo r Stamps, and Mine and Mill Suppl 
MINERS" HAND ROCK DRILL. " 
Address, 



The Balls revolve llorizontallF without rictlou. 
5 ft. size, weight 7,000 lbs., and does more work than 15 
Stamp*. 3 ft. size, weigh 3,0Ou lt>s. 

ConceDtiahing Mills, Rock Breakers. Amalgamating 
Pans nd Separators, Roasting Furnaces, Hoisting and 
Pumping Machinery, Endues at d Boilers, any size 
required, Hydraulic Giants a nd Pipe, Ore Card, Ore 
Buckets, Safely Cages. The Hand Power Two-stamp 
Mill, weight 230 lha. THE EUREKA WIRE ROPE 
TRAMWAYS; Concenti ating Riffles for Mills and Hy- 
draulic Sluices, 
i. Agents for IMLAY ORE CONCENTRATOR and the 
Information and Estimates cheerfullv given S rml loo- Catalogue. 

THE MOREY & SPE^kY MINING MACHINERY CO. 



ANTI-SCALE COMPOUND 

Manufactured by RICKARD & DURDEN. 

We guarantee that, with proper use, fais Compound will remove end prevent all 

INCRUSTATI ON IN STEA M BOILERS. 

Ten years trial, in widely separated lo calitiee, h-s dementtratid the vilue of this invention, and its applicability 
to different qualities of water. References cheerfully furnisned to any rus wishing same. 

4S-TEN POUND SAMPLE BOX FURNISHED FREE ON APPLICATION.*^ 

BERRY & PUCE MACHINE CO., Sole Agents, 

No. 8 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



READY FOR DELIVERY. 

LATHES, DRILLING MACHINES, PLANING MACHINES 

And Other Machine Tools. 
STRONG, DURABLE AND SUPERIOR TO IMPORTED MACHINES. 

Wheel Cutting to Order. 
SAW FRAOTCT^CO TOOK CO., 21 Stevenson St., S. P. 



Inipipg tpgjpeers. 

B. SALAZAR, 

Mining Engineer and Metallurgist. 

Graduate of Freiberg and Clausthal Royal Mining 
Schools, Germany, 

WILL KUKXISir ACCURATE REPORTS ON MINKS 
in the United Status and Mexico. Also, act as 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

To Campania 



all METALLURGICAL and MININt; 
MATTERS. 

Starting up Tunnels, Smelting or Leaching 
Works a Specialty. 

Several years' Practical Experience in Arizona and Mex- 
co. Would take charge of a mine or reduction works. 

TEMPORARY OFFICE with Kustel & Co., 318 Pine St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Lutskr, Wagoner, C. 



E., M. E. 
John Hays Hammond, M. E. 



Wagoner & Hammond, 
MINING ENGINEERS, 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, and 

Alamos, Sot o^a, Mexico 
Special attention to the designing ai>'' t*utiB< rue* i n of 
Concentration Works for * 11 o en. Gradual rLduuii*<i) by 
rolling impact, c aeBiflcation by air currents, improved 
pointed boxes and corrugated rubber and iron Rittinger 
tables. 

^^Correspondence and samples solicited from parties 
having low-grade properties. 

MINES REPORTED UPON. 



CSOB.CS MADEIRA, 

Geologibt and Mining Engineer. 



Reports on mines furnished; Estimates of Machinery 
etc. Special attention paid to the examination of mines 
in Mexico, California, Arizona and New Mexico. Thirty 
years in the mines of the above States. 

SI HABL.A ESPANOLA 1 

Address, care this office or SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 



C. H. AARON, 

CONSULTING AND PRACTICAL METALLURGIST, 

AUTHOR OP 

"Testing anil Working Silver Ores; Leaching Qolil 

and Silver Ores." 

Mines Examined as to Practical Value 

AdtlresB, l'INAL, ARIZONA. 



WM. BREDEMEYER, 

Mining, Consulting: and Civil Engineer 

n SfJIIXD xOXJTH 



48 

tun Pub 
Propertii 



STREET. UNITED, 

eyor for Utah and Idaho. No- 
:ological Examinations, Reports on Mining 
eys Minos, Railroads ami Canals, and 9ti- 
'orkingsof the same. Prepares Estimates 
rpuning and Working .Mines, Expert on 
s heifore the Courts. Address 1'. O. bos: 
lib*. Utah. 



W. W. BAILEY, 

Mecl\anical Er\gir\eer, 

Room 22, Stock Exchange, S. P. 
Plans and Specifications iamished for HoiBting, Pump, 
iug, Mill, Mining and other Machinery. Machinery in- 
spected and erected. 



SCHOOL OF 

Practical, Civil, Mechanical and Min 
ing Engineering, 

SURVEYING, DRAWING AND ASSAYING, 
J4 Post Street, San Francisco 

A. VAN DER NAILLKN, Principal. 
Send for fltrrnilftr 

W. C. JOHNSON, Engineer, 

Fltchburg, Mass., 

Engines, Mining and Kailroafl MacMneii and Supplies 

PURCHASED ON COMMISSION. 

Correspondence Solicited. Cal forma andNevada Refer- 
ences. Full advantages of falling pi ieeB in Eastern 
markets secured our customers 



San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works 



J. W. QUICK, MANUFACTURE!*. 

Several first premiums receivt d 
for Quartz Mill Screens, and Per- 
forated Sheet Metals of every 
description. I would call special 
attention to my SLOT CUT and 
SLOT PUNCHED SCREENS, 
which are attracting much at- 
tention and giving unversal 
satisfaction. This is the only 
establish men t on the coast de- 
voted exclusively to the manufac- 
ture of Screens. Mill owners using Battery Screens ezten 
Bively can contract for large supplies at favorable rates. 
Orders solieitedand promptly attended to. 

32 Fremont Street. San Francieeo. 



Wm 



Don't Forget the Stamp, — Always take a last look 
' a letter before posting to see that the stamp is in plate 
Recently one of our agents in Los Angeles county found a 
letter containing §3 for one year's subscription to our paper, 
held for postage which the writer no doub tthought he had 
duly stamped, and but for the incidental finding of it by 
ou r agent, would of course have supposed we had received 
the money Pt the proper time. Let all subscribers when 
remitting or ordering their paper stopped be sure they duly 
stamp their le:ters, 



July 28, 1883.J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



ohioago FRASER & CHALMERS. ^^oi 8 

MANUFACTURERS OP IMPROVED AND APPROVED FORMS OF 



lUvinif mule eitcnsiv* additions to our Shops and Machinery, we hive now the LARGEST and BEST AP- 
TOlNTKLi CHOI'S hi tho West. We arc prepared to build from the Latest *mi Most Approved Patten*, 



QUARTZ MILLS 



For working gold and silver ore* by wet or dry crushing. The Stctcteldt, Howell's Improved While, Branlon's & 
Bruckner Furnaces, for working bead ores. Hot&ry Dryers, Stetefcldt Improved Dry Kiln Furnace* 

SMELTING FURNACES, 

Water Jackets, cither Wrought W -wst Iron, made In section or <>ne piece, attl |Uin Our 

patterns mot* « SPECIAL FURNACES FUR OOPPfiB SMELTING. Bbf Pom and Cam. Improved 

1 1 «r Moulds and Ladle?, Litharge Cars und Pots, Cupel Furnaces and Cars. 

HOISTING ENGINES 

Wire Rope, Safety Cages and any Size and Forms of Cars 

Principal Office and Works, Fulton and Union Sts., Chicago, Illinois. 



Frue Ore Concentrator, or Vanner Mills. 

Coarse Concentrating Works, Improved Jigs, Crushing Rollers, Sizem, Trommels, B 1 ■■*, ami till othar 

adjuncts for the proper working ol OoM, Silver and I evert dota.ll. 

II \ I.I.I 1>II lMPKOVKD OK IS TKAMWAYM. Wo refer to Gen. Gustei 
Columbus Mine, Col., *,7&0 feet long; Mary Murphy mine, Cot., 6,000 feet ton*., all in const tut operation. 

LEACHING MILLS, 

Improved Corliss and Plain Slide Valve Meyer's Cut-off Engines. 

COHljBB ENQINE8 from 12*33 Cylinder, to 8O16O, PLAIN SLIDE VALV1 BOILERS 

of every farm, made of Pine Iron World C. H. No. 1 Manxe Iron, or Otis Slocl. Workmanship tho moot carclnl. All 
Kivet* Uitiul Dl 

Large or Small for flat or round rope. Double Cylinder Krurlnea. from 0x10 to 18x00. Thla latter rile famished J. B. Haggln for Giant and Old Abo Co , Black Hills 
alaoCorluisI'uinpinK Krnrinea, '20x00, forHolatlng and Pumping Worka, for li.OOO feet deep. Buby Holata for Pro»|>e<'tln,f, I II. P. n> n ll. p. 



McCaskell's Patent Car Wheels and Axles-Best in Use. 

New York Office, Walter McDermott, Manager, Room 32, No. 2 Wall St. 



CONTINENTAL WORKS. BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

Due's Mechanical Atomizer or Pulverizer. 

PorrednablB to an Impalpable powder all kinda of hard and brittle t-uhrtlancoe, BUCh ae QUAP.TZ, EMERY, CORUNDUM, GOLD 
AND SIi-VER ORES, H.MtVrES, COAL. UCI1KE. MAVuANKSE, IRO» OltEl, 

ZPHOSZPIEIA.TE ROCK, ETC. 

ft Is elinp'o and rot liable to get out of order, Revolving Shell being constructed of Siemons-Martin steel, and all parts mechanic.. 
.J of flrst-elaaa construct! -n. Weight 5,500 lbs.; heaviest piece, l,f>00 tbj. It will pulverize 7 to 10 Tons In IU Hoars 
wuti ju 11. P. For circulars and fu'I particulars apply to or address, 

THOS T. ROWLAND. Sole Man'fr. Brooklyn, NT. Y. 




SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO.. 

416 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery 
And Assay Office. 

HIOHIWT PRICKS TAID FOE 

(.old, Silver and L#ad Ores and Sulphurets. 

Manufacturers of Bluestone. 

ALSO, LEAD PIPE, SHEET LEAD, SHOT, ETC. 

This Company has the best facilities on the Coast 
(or working 

OOX.D, SILVER and LEAD 

IN THEIR VARIOUS FORMS. 
PRENTISS SELBY. - - Superintendent 



MINING^MACHINERY 

INCLUDINC 

Steel Water Jacket Smelting Furnace, 

Qaartz Mills, Concentration Works, Hoisting Apparatus, and all i-la.sscs of 
Machinery employed in Mining and Reduction <>!' Ores. 

PORTABLE AND STATIONARY 



COPPS u 

Laws. 



S. MINERAL LANDS, 



lias no Burplus verbiage. Contains Dr. Raymond's Glos- 
sary. Explains bow to examine mining titles. Contains 
numerous court decisions. Gives the Public Land Com- 
missions Codification, and gives many and improved forms. 

Price -Pull law binding, extra paper, 86.00. 
For Sale by DEOTEY & CO-, San Francisco. 

San Francisco Cordage Factory. 

Established 1856. 

Constantly on band a full assortment of Manila Rope, 

Slaa Rope, Tarred Manila Rope, Hay Rope, Whale 

Line, etc., etc. 

Extra sizes and lengths made to order on short notice 

TTJBBS & CO., 

ftll and 618 Front Street, San Francisco 

Patent Life -Saving Respirator. 

PttBVEHTB LEAD POISON WO AND SALIVATION'. 

Invaluable to those 
engaged fn dry crush- 
nn'inartz mill*, quick- 
silver mines, white lead 
corroding, feeding 
thrashing machines 
and all occupations 
where the surrounding 
atmosphere ia tilled 
with dust, obnoxious 
. in i 1 I .. or 'i,ii,..n M! 
vapors. The Respira- 
tors are sold subject 
to approval after trial, 
and, if not Hitisfactoiy, 
the price will be re- 
funded. Price, $3 
each, or 830 per dozen 

Address all conmnmi 
cations and orders 
to 

H. H. BROMLEY, Sole Agent, 
43 Sacramento Str eet, San Francisco, Cal. 



From Ten to Two Hundred Horse Power, Steam Boilers of any Style and rapacity. 

Adapted to wants of tho Planter, Miner, or for the manufacture of Merchant Lumber, 
Prices ra >ng from , m 

$200 

rom 2,000 to 50,000 root per day S 
•s for the Transmission of Power. 

LANE & BODLEY^CO., Cincinnati, 



Cpwards, and of Capacity from 2,000 to 50,000 Feet per day, Shaftings, 11 mgi 1 , Pulleys, 
Hearing, and nil Appliances for tho Transmission of Power. 




FOR SALE 



By J- M. LA.KENAN, of Grass Valley Foun- 
dry, Grass Valley, Cal. 

One 20-inch bore engine, '24-inch stroke; one 18-inch 
bon engine, 40-inch stroke, .Meyer's cut-off; one 14-inch 
bore engine, 86-inch stroke. Meyer's cut-off; two 12-inch 
bore engines, 30-inch stroke ; two sets heavy pumping gear, 
with bob and connecting rod irons, etc.; 450 toefco. 10-ineh 

pump pipe of 4-inch iron, heavy flanges; besides other 
mining and milling machinery. 
For information, address 

J. M. LAKENAN, 

GrasB Valley, Cal 



Pacific Rolling Mill Co., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

RAILROAD AND MERCHANT IRON, 

ROLLKD SHAMS, ANGLE, CHANNEL AND T IRON, BRIDGE AND MACHINE BOLTS, LAO SCREWS, NUTS 
WASHERS, ETC., STEAMBOAT SHAFTS, CRANKS, PISTONS, CONNECTING RODS, ETC., ETC. 

Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Hammered Iron of Every Description. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON 

tr Orders Solicited und Promptly Executed. 

Offlop, No SJ09 Marfcof SIC. rTTOION I' I. Of K 



THE ROLLER ORE FEEDER. 



[Patented May 2S, 1882.1 

M 



Tustin's Pulverizer 

WORKS ORE WET OR DRY. 




WM. BARTLINTJ. HBNRT BIMBAAL 

BARTLING & KIMBALL. 
BOOKBINDERS. 

Paper Rulers & Blank Book Manufacturer? 
505 Clay 3treet,(southwcst corner Sansome), 

BAH PR MIDI 400. 



Tins is the best and cheapest! Ore Feeder now in Use. 

It has fewer parts, requires less power, is simpler in 
adjustment than any other. Feeds coarse ore or soft 
clay alike uniformly, under one or all the stamps in a 
battery, as required. 

In the Bunker Hill Mill it has run continuously for two 
years, never having been out of order or costing a dollar 
for repairs. 

Golden State and Miners' Iron Works, 

Role Manufacturers, 
337 First Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL,, 



MANuTACTUKKD AT 

The Tustln Windmill Horse-power and 

Pumping Machine Works. 
308 Mission Street. S. P., Cal. 

By W. I. TDSTIN. Inventor and Patortoe. 



JOHN L. BOONE, 
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law, 

Rooms 7, 8 and 9, 

No. 320 California Street, S, F„ 

(Over Wells Fargo ft Co. 's Bans'. 

Special Attention Paid to Patent Law. 

N B —Mr. J. L, Boone *-as been connected with the 
Patent business for over 15 jears, and devnteB hiimelf 
..j n<w *>xcluiive)y to Patent litigation and kindred 
branches, * 




N. W. SPAULDING'S 

PATV SKl'T. Ifl T J> Itflil j 

PATENT DETACHABLE TOOTH SAWS, 

Manufactory, 17 * 19 Fremont St., 8. P. 



H. H. BROMLEY, 

Dealer in Leonard & Ellis Celebrated 



. TRADE MAK 



VwpE 



STEAM CYLINDER AND MACHINE OILS, 
The Best ana Cheapest. 

These Superior Oils cannot bo purchased through dealer 
aid are sold direct to coiutnmtr only by H. H. BROMLEY, 
sole HfaJcr in these gor ds 

Reference— Any first-class Engine or Machine Builder in 
America. AddieKK, 43 s urritiueiito Bl*> S. F. 



THE1 BESTJ IN USE! 



iMPROV^tBUCKET 



This is the only Scientifically Constructed Bucket in 
the market. It is itm k out from charcoal stampinr 
iron. No corners to Catch . Wo Bfams to burst. No 
interior corners to clog up. It runs with grcnt saee, and 
half tho power of the old atvle bucket. WILL OUT- 
WEAR HALF A DOZEN OF THEM. 

PRICES REDUCED. 

T. F. ROWLAND, Sole Mfr. 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 

H. P. GREGORY & CO., Agents, San Francisco, Cal., 
carry a stock of all sizes. 



PACIFIC POWER CO. 

Room with steam power to Jot in the 
Pacific Power Co.'s new brick building, 
Stevenson street, near Market, Eleva- 
tor in building. Apply at the Com- 
Dany'a office. 314 California stroet. 

cc iDXJisrcA.3sr " 

ROCK DRILL 

FOR MINES, QUARRIES, ETC. 

J. CUYAS, Agent, 



10 Park Place, 



New Tork. 



RICHARD C. REMMEY, Agent, 

Philadelphia Chemical Stoneware Manufactory, 

1100 East Cumberland St., Philadrlphia, Pa. 



Manuiacturer cf 

all kinds of 




—for — 

ManufActurlng 
acid J Chemists. 

POT Jf Also Chemica Brick-* 

for Glover Tower. 



(JO 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 28, 1883 



Patents and Inventions, 



List of U. S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

From the official list of U. S. Patents in Dewey & Co.'s 
Scientific Press Patent Agency, 252 Market St., S. F 

Fob Week Endinc July 17, 1883. 
281,236.— Spring Draft Tug— Otto Brunck, 

S. F. 

281,338.— Arm Rest- -Wm. 1. Butler, Salinas, 
Cal. 

' 281,448.— Sealing Envelopes— I-I. A. Buttncr, 
San Quentin, Cal. 

281,341. —Magazine Gun- Howard Carr, S. F. 

28i,459.--Water Wheel— Geo. W. Converse, 
Spokane Falls, W. T. 

281,467. — Animal Trap— Jas. H. Cook, Lone 
Pine, Cal. 

281,492.— Pipe Grapple— E. K. Green, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

281,507.— Fruit Pi'tter — N. B. Hicks, San Ber- 
nardino, Cal. 

281,511.- -Machine for Grinding Ores— Wm. 
H. Rowland, S. F. 

281.370. —Wave Power--W. E. Jory, S. F. 

281,525. — Pen or Pencil Holder— Wm. Lane, 
S. F. 

281,550.— Safetv Device for Elevators— C. 
C. Palmer, Oakland, Cal. 

281,396.— Apparatus for Filling Bottles, 
etc. — C. C. Redmond, San Jose, Cal. 

281,399.— Smoke Burning Attachment for 
Stoves, etc. — Wm. H. Richardson, S. F. 

281,568. — Extension Shank for Bits — C. 
Schoch, Tiuckee, Cal. 

281,403. — Manifold Writing Case — Scott & 
Gordon, Santa Cruz, Cal. 

281,598. — Dish Washer — Ella Wiseman, Fulton, 
Cal. 

281,401. — Steam Motor Boiler— Josef Schrei- 
ber, Vienna, Austria-Hungary. 

281,373. — Coffepot — Thos. Keys, Chicago, 111. 
10,435. — Trade-mark for Vinegar made of 
Wine — Pacific Vinegar Co. , S. F. 

Note. — Copies of U. S. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by tele- 
graph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent busi- 
ness for Pacific coast Inventors transacted with perfect 
security and in the shortest possible time. 

Notices of Recent Patents. 

Among the patents recently obtained through 
Dewey & Co.'s Scientific Press American and 
Foreign Patent Agency, the following are 
worthy of special mention: 

Arm Rest. — Wm. Butler, Salinas, Monterey 
Co. No. 281,338. Dated July 17, 1883. This 
invention relates to a new and useful rest or 
support for the arm, the object of which is to 
enable one to steady his hand in aiming with a 
rifle or other lire-arm, or a bow of any descrip- 
tion, or in sighting a telescope or spy glass, or 
for any other purpose which requires a iirm and 
steady support. The left arm is fitted through 
an elastic band up to a point }ust above the 
elbow. The arm is turned with the palm of the 
hand up to grasp the rifle underneath, and the 
curved metal strip bears under the arm. A short 
arm or plate extends along the under side of the 
arm to the body, and the lower arm of the plate 
passes down the left side of the body, being se- 
cured firmly thereto by straps. A ratchet and 
pawl is so arranged as to hold the support and 
the arm. The arm is firmly supported at any 
inclination desired. The device is particularly 
useful as a rifle rest. 

Head-Block Gear for Saw Mills. — Melvin 
C. Meeker, Occidental, Sonoma Co., Cal. No. 
•281,100, Dated July 10, 18S3. This invention 
relates to improvements in the gear for setting 
up the head-blocks in saw mills. The improve- 
ments consist in an arrangement of gears and 
clutches by which the head-blocks, when set 
up, may be drawn back with rapidity, thus 
losing no time, and also in ;i certain arrange- 
ment of levers joined to a single lever, and 
means for disengaging those of either end to op- 
erate both blocks, or only one, as the character 
of the work may demand. The object of the 
device is to enable the operator, after the log 
has been sawed up, to draw the knees back with 
greater rapidity than they are set up, to save 
time, and also to set both or either knee to such 
position as each particular log may require, or 
the object in view demands, such as is required 
in sawing telegraph poles and other tapering 
work. 

Magazine Guns. — Howard Carr, S. F. No. 
281,341. Dated July 17, 1883. The improve, 
ments in magazine guns covered by this patent 
are especially applicable to what is known as 
the "Winchester rifle breech mechanism." It 
consists of certain improvements in the carrier 
block, the firing bolt and extractor of empty 
shells, and the magazine by which the gun is 
adapted to fire cartridges of small caliber for 
gallery use. In such a gun as is used to kill 
small game, as squirrels or birds, with fulminat- 
ing powder and small balls, the recoil from such 
ammunition is so small, no powerful recoil ox- 
breech block is needed, as the bolt is sufficient 
for the purpose. 

Coffee Pot. — Thomas Keys, Chicago, 111. 
No. 281,373. Dated July 17, 18S3. Inside the 
main vessel is a coffee holder with a perforated 
bottom and partially perforated sides. The ob- 
ject of the peculiar construction is to expose as 
great a surface of the ground coffee to the action 
of the water as possible and to permit the water 



to permeate the mass with better effect and 
more thoroughly than if the bottom alone was 
exposed to its action. There is a suitable rim 
to prevent grounds passing out over the top 
when the pot is held at an inclination to pour 
out coffee from the spout. There is also a cap 
or cover for the end of the spout, which may be 
readily applied, and when not in use will still 
be at hand without being liable to be misplaced. 

Steam Motor Boiler. — Josef Schreiber, 
Vienna, Austria. No. 2S1,401. Dated July 
17, 1883. This improvement in boilers consists 
of a boiler shell, supported upon and within an 
inclosing casing or stand, within which the 
grate or heating apparatus is contained. A 
series of tubes depend from the bottom of the 
boiler into the furnace, and within these are 
suspended smaller circulating tubes. The feed 
water enters the boiler after inassiiig through a 
heating coil, and is caused to enter the small 
circulating tubes, through which it is led to the 
bottom of the inclosing tubes, converted into 
steam, and led through tubes to the upper part 
of the boiler without being reduced in tempera- 
ture by passing through the body of water 
within the boiler. Steam for the engine is taken, 
from the upper part of the steam space and 
passes by a pipe, through the fire space, where 
it is superheated before its exit. 

Manifold Writing Case. — Frank D. Scott 
and Oscar L. Gordon, Santa Cruz. No. 181,- 
403. Dated July 17, 1S83. This is a novel 
case or table for producing manifold im- 
pressions of writing. The object is to provide 
a convenient means for producing manifold im- 
pressions, for use by clerks and salesmen in 
stores, or for any uses requiring copies. The 
box is convenient to carry and furnishes a good 
surface on which to write. The layers of paper 
are always in position and the carbon paper 
need never be handled. When a memorandum 
is made, the ends of the writing papers are 
grasped and drawn out under the bands until 
they reach a point where a cutter will sever 
them below the writing. They are then torn 
off against the cutter with ease and precision. 
The sheets pass off the rolls within the box 
without interference. New rolls of paper may 
be readily inserted. 

Smoke Burxing Attachment for Stoves. — 
Wm. H. Richardson, S. F. No. 281,3119. 
Dated July 17, 1883. This invention relates to 
an attachment to stoves, furnaces and radiators, 
and it consists of a chamber, formed in the pipe, 
between the furnace and the chimney, and a 
supplemental pipe leading therefrom to a point 
below the grate, and, in connection with these, 
of a damper or valve, whereby the products of 
combustion are returned to the body of the 
stove, furnace or radiator, through the space 
below the grate bars, to be exposed to the ac- 
tion of fire again, before finally escaping to the 
chimney. 

Animal Trap. — James H. Cook, Lone Pine, 
Inyo county, Cal. No. 281,461. Dated July 
17, 1S83. This is a new animal trap of that 
class known as the "gravitating platform," in 
which the weight of the animal causes the foun- 
dation to give way and preeipitate him into a 
receptacle. In this there is combined with the 
receptacle a cover, or lid, formed with a num- 
ber of independent, hinged spring flaps, or sec- 
tions, operating entirely below the level of the 
top of the trap, and hinged at the extreme outer 
edges. There are springs for resetting each sec- 
tion, and a bait arm for suspending the bait 
over the center of the trap. 

Wave Power.— Wm. E. Jory, S. F. No. 
2S1,370. Dated July 17, 1S83. This invention 
relates to that class of devices specially adapted 
tobeaffectedbythe waves, and commonly known 
as "wave powers." It consists in a float having 
vertical screws connected witli the main shaft by 
gearing, which transmits the vertical movement 
of said screws in a peculiar manner. The object 
is to provide a simple and effective means for 
utilizing the power of the waves and tides. 



Utah's Bullion. — The Salt Lake Herald es- 
timates that the bullion yield of Utah for the 
six months ending June 30, 18S3, at $4-,f>00,000. 
The monthly receipts of bullion at Salt Lake 
have been as follows for the period: January, 
$473,026; February, $577,041; March, $664,- 
572; April, $563,342; May, $506,565; June, 
S453,4S0; total bullion. S3,238,026. This is ex- 
clusive of the value of the ores shipped to out- 
side smelters. The product of the Mingo smelter 
is not included, nor any of the Silver Reef 
smelters, except the Stormont. The Crescent 
City mine has yielded much, but there are no 
returns from that mine in the above total. The 
Ontario mine has not done as well as usual, 
owing to improvements in progress. 

The Portland (Or.) Daily News reports that 
John MeCafferty, from New York, has been 
prospecting for coal leads, and has located 
eighteen miles south of Renton three sections 
of land, the coal from which will make excellent 
coke. A company has been formed to reduce 
the coal to coke, which will be shipped to Butte, 
Montana, to be used in the reduction of silver 
ores, in which Mr. MeCafferty is interested. 
These coal fields are said to be on the Seattle 
branch railroad. 



In 1872 the production of copper in the 

United States was 28,000,000 pounds, and in 

1882 it had risen to SS,000,000. The Pacific 
coa$t raised the figures greatly. 



The Late Wrn. J. Lewis, Civil Engineer. 

The subject of the following notice was well 
and favorably known to most of the old resi- 
dents of San Francisco; but owing to his retir- 
ing and shrinking nature and habits, only a 
very few, even of his intimate friends, were ac- 
quainted with his life history. A brother en- 
gineer, another of San Francisco's old and re- 
spected citizens, Sherman Day, has furnished 
us with a brief obituary which will no doubt 
be read with much interest by our readers gen- 
erally : 

AVm. J. Lewis was born in Chester county, 
Penn., April 4, 1812. His father was a teacher 
of the Quaker denomination, eminent for his 
skill in mathematics, and author of several works 
on arithmetic and algebra. The elder brother of 
W. J. Lewis — Judge Joseph J. Lewis, of West- 
chester — was Commissioner of Internal Revenue 
under President Lincoln. William inherited 
his father's mathematical talent, and at the 
early age of sixteen was a correspondent of the 
Mathematical Diary, a New York paper, 
solving some twenty difficult questions in 
mathematics. Throughout his life nothing 
seemed to please him more than to sit up all 
night solving some intricate problem. He re- 
ceived his early education from his father. He 
chose civil engineering for his profession, and 
served as an assistant under John Edgar Thom- 
son, an eminent engineer of Pennsylvania, who 
had been a pupil of Lewis' father. After a 
sufficient experience gathered in that school he 
became a resident eugtueer on the Louisville, 
Cincinnati and Charleston railroad, at a period 
when John C. Fremont was employed on the 
same work. He afterwards served successively 
as Chief Engineer of the Brooklyn and Jamaica 
railroad, on Long Island, and of the Norris- 
town, Doylestown and New Hope railroad and 
of the New Jersey Central railroad. After- 
wards, for the six years from 1 842 to '48, Mr. 
Lewis was a teacher in Philadelphia. During 
the three last years of this term he was at the 
head of a school of his own for teaching mathe- 
matics and engineering. 

In the year 1849 he came to California as a 
member of one of the companies, so common at 
that time, for mutual outfit and protection. 
The company commenced work in the placer 
mines at Sullivan's diggings in Tuolumne coun- 
ty, but they soon dissolved as a company ; 
some staid in the mines and some left, and 
among the latter was Mr. Lewis. An Irishman 
of the company, who stuck to the mines about 
sixty days and then left, bsing questioned as to 
his reason for leaving, replied that mining 
didn't suit his "jaynius." Mr. Lewis was prob- 
ably actuated by the same motive. He came 
to Santa Clara county, and during the first year 
was associated with Mr. Hathaway, Captain 
Winslow and others in cultivating a small tract 
in the southern suburbs of San Jose. But farm- 
ing was no more to his taste than mining, and 
lie opened an office in San Jose hi 1850 for the 
practice of his regular profession. He also went 
into partnership with a brother surveyor for 
owning and cultivating a 100-acre tract near 
San Jose, but the place which they occupied 
for about three years was of more value as a 
surveyor's home than for the profits of cultiva- 
tion. Soon after the county of Santa Clara was 
organized, Mr. Lewis was appointed County 
Surveyor. He was elected to the same office 
in 1852, and re-elected in 1854, retaining the 
office until June, 1855, when he resigned to ac- 
cept the office of City Surveyor of San Fran- 
cisco. His surveys in the county of Santa 
Clara were characterized by accuracy, imparti- 
ality and neatness of mapping, and the records 
of them are regarded as specially reliable. 

In September, 1851, he was selected as chief 
engineer to make the preliminary survey and 
location of the San Francisco and San Jose rail- 
road, which he performed during the autumn of 
that year, presenting a satisfactory report 
and map. The funds for the costruction of 
the road were not raised for several years, and 
it was not till 1855 that he was called to make a 
second survey, and a third in 1861, when its 
construction was begun, and he remained Chief 
Engineer till 1863. While the San Jose railroad 
remained in abeyance, he made a preliminary 
survey of a railroad from Marysville to Benieia. 
After the completion of the San Jose road in 
1S63 he became Chief Engineer of the Western 
Pacific railroad, from San Jose to Sacramento, 
while it was under the charge of Judge Dame, 
previous to its transfer to Stanford & Co. He 
also made a survey for the extension of the San 
Jose railroad to Gilroy. In 1853 he was ap- 
pointed U. S. Deputy Surveyor, and between 
that date and 1861 he surveyed a large number 
of ranches under Mexican grants, and several 
at still later dates. 

Among these surveys was one of the line be- 
tween the claims of the New Almaden Mine and 
the Capitancillos rancho, involving the evidence 
to be derived from the growth of trees blazed 
long years since. The chips from these old 
blazes were cut out and exhibited at the trial 
before Judge Hoffman; and in his evidence Mr. 
Lewis referred to the old trees which he had 
seen during his railroad surveys in South Caro- 
lina at the battlefield of "The Cowpens;" these 
trees still carrying the balls shot into them at 
the time of the battle. Another very impor- 
tant one of his ranch surveys was the location 
of the "PanocheGrande" grant — (MeGarrahan's) 
— according to the calls of the grant which 
placed it between two well known adjoining 



ranches named in the grant, and limited the 
number of leagues. After having finished his 
location on the ground, Mr. Lewis inquired of 
some of the party in attendance, — "now where 
is the New Idria Mine?" And he said "they 
pointed it out as near a mountain away off' to 
the south in the blue distance about 25 miles." 

In June 1855 he was appointed city surveyor 
of San Francisco, which place he held until the 
passage of the Consolidation Act in 1856, when 
the county officers supplanted those of the city. 
In 1866 he submitted plans for the seawall 
around the waterfront of San Francisco, which 
were accepted, and he was appointed Chief en- 
gineer in May 1S67 to superintend the work. 
He held this position until 1870. 

Whenever Mr. Lewis was in charge of any 
work as Chief Engineer, he took hold of it with 
enthusiasm and diligence, bringing to it his ex- 
tensive practical experience, and displaying 
much executive ability in his selection of assis- 
tants and subordinates, and in the details of the 
management ; and his notes, records and re- 
ports were carefully made and entitled to full 
confidence. No charge of incapacity, or trick- 
ery, venality or ' 'crookedness" was ever breathed 
against him. He was a man of the strictest in- 
tegrity; in social manners affable and unosten- 
tations ; and universally esteemed by those with 
whdm his professional business brought him in 
contact, as well as by his professional brethren. 
Mr. Lewis derived his appellation of "Colonel" 
from an appointment as Engineer on the staff 
of Major Gen. Halleck then of the State Mili- 
tia, a few months before the civil war. 

After the leading railroads of California past 
under the control of the owners of the Central 
Pacific, the business of railroad engineering in 
California fell mainly into the hands of their en- 
gineers ; and those who had not enlisted under 
their banner were left out in the cold. Mr. Lewis 
was one of the latter. He still continued to at- 
tend to the surveying of ranchos. and smaller 
tracts, and such occasional miscellaneous engi- 
neering as offered. He was frequently called on 
to make elaborate computations, and write up 
notes where special accuracy in figures was 
needed. He sought for a position, for which 
he was eminently fitted, as a teacher of mathe- 
matics, but hi this he was not successful. He 
occasionally contributed articles on his favorite 
science to the public press. 

When he removed to San Francisco his wife 
and only son joined him from the East, and he 
purchased a homestead in this city, where they 
dwelt pleasantly for more than a quarter of a 
century. But a dark cloud was cast over their 
home by the death of their only child, a son 
just coming to manhood, who was accidentally 
killed on the San Jose railroad some years since. 
Mrs. Lewis, a most estimable lady, who had 
been the main light and comfort of his home, 
died a little more than a year before her hus- 
band. Mr. Lewis still continued to dwell at 
his old home, but the last year of his life was a 
lonely and sad one for several reasons, until at 
length his naturally strong constitution yielded 
to an attack of kidney disease, and he died on 
the 7th of July, 1883, at the age of seventy- 
one. He leaves one brother in this State, a 
farmer in Santa Cruz county, and another in 
Minnesota. 



A History of California.— A. Roman, of 
120 Sutter street, S. F., has just published a 
revised and enlarged edition of "A Popular 
History of California" from the earliest period 
of its discovery to the present time, by 
Lucia Norman. It is amost excellent little 
work (216 pages), and not simply a dry 
statement of facts, names and dates, but 
is written in an animated and elegant style. It 
is comprehensive and compact — a marvel of 
conciseness — from the preface to the end. The 
only illustration in the book is an excellent copy 
of Nahl's famous painting, "The Sutter Mill," 
which has now become an historical picture, so 
much prized by all early Californians. The book 
is for sale at all hook stores, and mailed to any 
address, postage paid, upon the receipt of price 
by publisher. 

Banish ill health, nervousness, vexation, fretfulness, 
ete., by using Brown's lion Bitters. 



Successful Patent Solicitors. 

Ae Dewey k Co- have been iu the patent soliciting busi- 
ness on this i:ii;.sl now for so many years, the linn' nnroe 
Is a well-known one. Another reason for its popularity is 
that a great proportion of the Pacific coast patents lasutd 
by the Government have beon procured through their 
agency. They are, therefore, well and thoroughly posted 
on the needs of the progressive industrial classes of this 
coast. They are the best posted tirm on what has been 
done <n all branches of industry, and are able to judge of 
what is new and patentable. In Elds they br.ve a great 
advantage, which is of practical dollar and cent value Io 
their clients. That is Mi is understood r:kI appreciated la 
evidenced by the uumbcr of patents issued bii rough their 
SciKNTirio Fxkss Patent Agency (8. F.) from waste to 
we<ik and voir to vear 



Cheap Ore Pulverizer., 

There is for sale in i his city, by I. A. Heaid, American 
Machine and Model Worts, 111 and 113 First St., a 
Rutherford Pulverizer, an improved revolving barrel 
crusher, which was only used a few times and is as good 
as new. It will he sold very much below cost, and 
miners wbo are in need of Buch an appliance for a small 
mine will do well to make inquiries concerning it. It is 
ui table for a pulverizing mill for powder or other sub- 
stances. Reference as to above can be had upon applying 
to this office. 



July 28, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



61 



Mechanics' Institute. 

Tin Mechanics' Institute "f tin 
taking some little trouble t ■ mem 

berahip, and rendering the advantag* i it pos- 
sesses available to a larger class ol people. The 
tr tin tees have issued cards inviting the public to 
pay a visit of inspection t«> tin library and read 
in- room ■ "i» any Saturday cv< 

will be tome i to escort \ i ^ i t . >t - around the 

rooms aii'l •■[■liiii to them the working! ol the 
institute. 

Tii* libi .• . ro - ar large, well lighted, 

and include a private 
tion and reading parlor for ladies. The library 
ooni lit)-- 33,000 volumes, th j depart- 

in. nt, 16,000: I s well selected, and uew Rtand 
ard and popular works axe added as ,; 
I tear. I department is unusually 

, contains many valuable works 
d by other libraries on tin 
lizod as the besteduoational library 
in the State, Bfemfa dl the privileges 

of ■ private library, the rules permitting per- 
sonal access t" tin- ifa i hi reading rooms 
are well supplied with papers, magasines and 
i . yii w s (rata all parts of tin- world, especial at- 
tention being given to scienti6c and educational 
publications. The chess roam isthe largi -i and 

a i In- intry, and tin- strongest playei 

■ >ii this coast, attracted by it. have become mem- 
■ I..' [nstitute. Thin institution baa bet d 
ma. I. ■ tin. official repository lot patent reports 
by both tin- English ami American goi ernments, 
thus making membi rahiii of benefit to manu- 
facturers and indespensable to inventors. 

The dues are only fifty cents per month ami 
the initiation fee 91, while a life membership 
may be purchased for $50. The trustees have 
wisely concluded also to give members of the 
Institute double or single season tickets for the 
coming fair, for half the usual price. Fur gen- 
eral information we append the following on 
this subject : Tin- double season ticket will admit 
the owner and any lady ami one child, under 
fight; or, any two ladies ami one child, under 
eight; or, any lady ami two children, under 
eight; or, the owner and two children, under 
eight, but muBt not be presented by any gen- 
tleman Other than the original owner. If a 
lady member purchases a double season ti< U< t, 
it will be issued as a lady's tieket, in her name; 
no gentleman can use it, but any two ladies and 
one child, under eight, can have admission therc- 
on. 'I'll ■ single season ticket is not transferable. 
Tickets at above reduced rates are sold to mem- 
bera only. The price of tickets to the general 
public is unaltered, viz.: Double season, $5.00; 
single season, $3.00; child's season, si. 50; ap- 
prentices Beason, $1.30; adult single admission, 
oO rents: child's single admission, "J"j cents. 

Till Salt Lake Tribu.ru hears of an important 
mining sale in American Fork canyon, in which 
Mr. Xatt. Cullen, of Horn Silver fame, sold to 
John M. Burke, Esq., and DeIaney*Bros.,a'half 
interest in three mining claims for S70,000- the 
Mary Kllen, Live Yankee ami Extension. It is 
a good sale, ami we understand the purchasers 
will proceed at once to the thorough opening of 
their property, in which there arc large bodies 
of ore. 

Mo mattbh H'hatyour ailmont is, Brawn's Iron Bitters 
»ill surch benefit you. 



Our Agents. 

Okr Fkirnds can -I" much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agoiita in their labors of canvassing, 1>j lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend to send none 
hut worthj men. 

<}. W. McGrkw Santa Clara county. 

M. P. Owbs— Santa Cma county. 

.i. w. a. Wright Merced, Tulare ami Kern counties. 

Jahbd C. HOAd California. 

it. W". CROWKLL -Arizona Territory 

M. H. Joseph — Euroka, Nev. 

I. M. IjKIMY— Los Angeles, San Bernardino and San 
Diego counties. 

A. C. Knox— Orotfon and Washin^on Tor. 

.1. .1. Baktkli, — Yolo county. 

K. 1*. Eii.umi.- San Luis Obispo Co. 

IMPORTANT additions are being continually made in 
Woodward's Gardens. The grotlo walled with aquaria is 
constantly receivi ig accessions of new fish and other marine 
life. The number of sea lions is increased, and there is a 
better chance to study their actions The pavilion has new 
varieties of performances The floral department is replete, 
and the wild animals in good vigor. A day at Woodward's 
Gardens is a day well spent. 



COMPLIMENTAKY SAMPLKS or Tills PAPER are 
occasionally sent to parties connected with the 
interests specially represented in its columns. 
Persons so receiving copies are requested to 
examine its contents, terms of subscription, and 
give it their own patronage, ami, as far as 
practicable, aid in circulating the journal, and 
making its value more widely known to others, 
and extending its influence in the cause it faith- 
fully serves. Subscription rate, $4 a year, in 
advance. Extra copies mailed for 10 cents, if 
ordered soon enough. Personal attention will 
be called to this (as well as other notices, at 
times,) by turning a leaf. 

Don't Fail to Write. 

Should this paper he received by any subscriber who 
docs not want it. or beyond the time they intend to pay 
for it, let them not fail to write us direct, to stop it. A 
postal card (costing only one cent) will sulticc. We will 
not knowingly send the paper to anyone who does not 
wish it, but if it is continued, through the failure of the 
subscriber to notify us to discontinue it, or some irre- 
sponsible party reipiested to stop it, we shall positive I j 
demand payment for the time tt is sent 



Know 



Th.it Brown's I ron Bitters 
will cure the worst case 
. >f dyspepsia. 

Will insurea hearty appetite 
and incre.i-.cd digestion. 

Cures general debility, and 
^ives a new lease of life. 

Dispels nervous depression 
and low spirits. 

Rest. >res an exhausted nurs- 
ing mother to full strength 
and gives abundant sus- 
tenance for her child. 

Strengthens the musclesand 
nerves.en riches the blood. 

Overcomes weakness, wake- 
fulness.and lack ofencrgy 

Keeps off all chills, fevers, 
and other malarial poison. 

Will infuse with new life 
the weakest invalid. 



37 Walker St., Baltimore, Per. iSRr. 
For six years 1 ti.ivc been ;i great 
sufferer from rjlood Disease, Dys- 
pepsia .a !i tlCoiislip.il ion, and became 
so debilitated that I could not retain 
anything on my stomach, in fact, 
life had almost become a burden. 
Finally, when hope had almost left 
me, my husband seeing Bhown's 
Iron BlTTBRS advertised in the 
paper, induced me to give it a trial. 
I am now taking the third bottle 
and have not felt so well in six 
years as I do at the present time. 

Mrs. L. F. Gkifpin. 



Brown's Iron Bitters 
will have a better tonic 
effect upon any one who 
needs "bracing up," than 
any medicine made. 



QUICKSILVER. 

TjIE celebrated A erand. 
Shipped Direct from the New Almaden Mine, 

New Almauen, Santa Clara Co., Ca 1 . 

For eale in any quanti'y. Traded, .'k A 0*1 top <? 
$ tjska secured by United Srufces Pat.it, and regis. .■((' 
Fl ^ke contain 7'*>i lbs. tjuicksilvcr. Wei^V.t and purity 
£d'*raoteed. 

CAKLOAD LOTS will be shipn^d from S"\n Jose, f. o. 
b., for Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Men 1 an \ and Idp' o 
or Utah, or delivered at Pa. ificMail SteimshipCo.'ewliar;, 
and Depot of S. P. R. R. Co., San Francisco, witrtout 
i >iar^e. Railroad rates from San Jose are the B.ime ss 
7j"om"San Francisco. 

J. B. RANDOL, 

P. O Roy. )07S. SSO Snuiome Sr.raaL S. P 



UNITED STATES 

Submarine Monitor 

230 Montgomery Street, Room 20, 

SAM FBANOlSeO. 

WM. H MILLIKEN, Engineer. 



U5T Plans arc "" exhibition and stork rcadj for issue, 
Any information that is desired ean bo furnished at th 
office ah above. 



FOR SALE. 
Globe Iron Works. 

Foundry, Machine, and Blacksmith Shop. 

COK. MAIN ANIi COMMERCIAL STS., 

Near Steamboat Landing, - - STOCKTON, CAL. 

Apply to JOHN CAINE. Prop. 



Bot'xtt Volume of the Phkms.— We have a few sets of 
the back tiles of the Mining and Scientific Prkss which 
we will sell for S3 per (half yearly) volume. Iti cloth and 
leather binding, £5. These volumes, complete, ate scarce, 
and valuable for future reference and library use. 



Educational. 




2\ 



MARY'S HALL 

BENICIA, CAL 
THE NEXT TERM 

SEMINARY FOrTuUNG LADIES 

win. Mlmdu 

A rt . « ■ I 

Thursday August 3, 1883. 

■■ ui with full 

i. 'i . 

i'i ' ■■ ■ '■! ; . SSI , A M 



THE HARMON SEMINARY, 

Berkeley, Cal. 

A FIRST-CLASS BOARDING SCHOOL 

FOR YOUNG LADLES. 

For Catalogues or other Information, address s, s 
HARMON, Berkeley, Cal., or K. J. IVickson, -hi Clas 
5troe( Son Francisco. 



Redlands. 



The most delightfully situated colony in 
Southern California. 

Remarkably healthy, being 2,000 feet above 
the soft level. 

Wholly devoted to fruit culture, and vspo- 
cially adapted to oranges and raisins. 

Advantages of church, sehool, store, depot, 
hotel, stage line, telegraph and telephone. 

Illustrated Circulars on Application. 

JUDSON& BROWN, 

Redlands, 

SAW BERNARDINO. CALIFORNIA. 




Is the Best Pump in tne World. Another 

New Improvement is Lewis' Patent 

Spray Attachment. 

fan change from solid stream tn sjirnv instantly. Kegu- 
lar retail price, $6. Weight, ij ll>s. Length, ai inches. 
For s,m,k. by JOHN H. WHEELER. 
Ill Leidesdorff St., S. P. 
P. S.— A sample can lie seen at this odice. 



Printers, Authors, Inventors, 
Patentees, Builders, Manufactur- 
ers, Machinists, Merchants, and 
other trades- people can have satisfac- 
tory Engravings and Electrotypes made 
at moderate prices by the .S. F. En- 
craving Co., No. 405 Kearny St. 
Send photographs, sketches, drawings, 
models or samples for estimates. Map 
ami Woodcut Engravings enlarged or 
reduced by the aid of photography, at 
less than one-half the cost of the origi- 
nals and in a short time. Photo-relief, 
Zincograpk and other improved meth- 
ods employed. 



Good laim T.nar, will raise a crop every 
year. Uver 12,000 acres for sale in lots to 
suit. Very desirable Fruit, Vine, Grain, 
Vegetable, Hay, and Pasture Land. 
Near Railroad and Sacramento rivor; iti to $80 per acre. 
Wood and water convenient. U. S. Title perfect. Send 
stamp for illustrated circular, to EDWARD PRISBIB, 
Proprietor of Reading Ranch, Anderson, Shasta Co., Cal. 



LAND 



Rem ITTAHCBS to this office should be made by postal order 
or registered letter, when practicable. Cost of postal 
order, for §15 or less, 10 eta.; for registered letter, in addi- 
tion to regular postage (at 3 cts. per half ounce), 10 cts. 



Dewey & Co., American and 
Foreign Patent Agents, 

PATENTS obtained promptly; I 
expeditiously; Patent Reiaauej taken ont; 
■ orded in leg] 
■ " 
Examinations of Patent* madi 
Washington; Examinations mad 
menta recorded in Waahinj , . 
ordered and reported by Telegraph; i;« jL cto<l 
cases taken up and Patents obtained; Enter- 
feranoea Prosecuted; Opinion 
garding the validity of Patonti 
menta; Every leg I 

nig promptly and 

ducted. 
Our intimate knowled Uive-n- 

(ao&B of this coast, and lor 
business, enable us to abundantly satisfy our 

patrons; and our success and business are 
constantly inereaaing. 
The abrewdest and most experienced Invmtors 
are found among our most steadfast frauds 
and patrons, who fully appreciate our advan- 
tages tn bringing valuable inventions to the 
notice of the public through the columns of 
our widely circulated, lirst-class joui 
thereby facilitating their introduction, sale 
and popularity. 

Foreign Patents. 

In addition to American Patents, \vi 
with the assistance of co-operative 
claims in all foreign eountnes which 
Patents, including (ireat Britain, Prance, 
Belgium, Prussia, Austria, Baden, Peru- 
Russia, Spain, British India, Saxony, British 
Columbia, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Mexico, 
Victoria, Brazil, Bavaria, Holland, Denmark, 
Italy, Portugal, Cuba, Roman States, 
Wurtemburg, New Zealand, New South 
Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, Brazil, New 
Granada, Chile, Argentine Kepublic, AND 
EVERY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD 
where Patents are obtainable. 

No models are required in European countries, 
but the drawings and specifications should be 
prepared with thoroughness, by able persons 
who are familiar -with the requirements and 
changes of foreign patent laws — agents who 
are reliable and thoroughly established. 

Our schedule price for obtaining foreign patents, 
in all cases, will always be as low, and in 
some instances lower, than those of any other 
responsible agency. 

We can and do get foreign patents for inveutoia 
in the Pacific States from two to six month > 
(according to the location of the country) 
sooner than other agents. 

The principal portion of the patent business of 
this coast has been done, and is still being 
done, through our agency. We are familiar 
with, and have full records, of all former 
cases, and can more correctly judge of the 
value and patentability of most inventions dis- 
covered here than any other ageuts. 

Situated so remote from the seat of government, 
delays are even more dangerous to the invent- 
ors of the Pacific Coast than to applicants in 
the Eastern States. Valuable p-.tents may be 
lost by extra time consumed in transmitting 
specifications from Eastern agencieB back to 
this coast for the signature of the inventor. 

Confidential. 

We take great pains to preserve secrecy in 
all confidential matters, and applicants for 
patents can rest assured that their communi- 
cations and business transactions will be held 
Rtrictly confidential by us. Circulars of in- 
formation to inventora, free. 

Home Counsel. 

Our long experience in obtaining patents for 
Inventors on this Coast has familiarized us 
with the character of most of the invention.; 
already patented; hence we are frequently 
able to save our patrons the cost of a fruitless 
application by pointing to them the saie.o 
thing already covered by a patent. We are 
always free to advise applicants of any 
knowledge we' havo of previous applicant 
which will interfere with their obtaining a 
patent. 

We invite the acquaintance of all parties con- 
nected with inventions and patent right butr! - 
ness, believing that the mutual conference of 
legitimate business and professional men i« 
mutual gain. Parties in doubt in regard to 
their rights as assignees of patents or pur- 
chasers of patented articles, ean often receive 
advice of importance to them from a short call 
at our office. 

Remittances of money, made by individual in- 
ventors to the Government, sometimes mia- 
oany, and it has repeatedly happened thaS 
applicants have not only lost their money, but 
their inventions also, from this cause and eo.n. 
sequent delay. We hold ourselves responsil la 
for all fees entrusted to our agency. 

Engravings. 

W j h&ve superior artists m our employ, and 
all facilities for producing fine and sa'-is-'a ^>ry 
illustrations of inventions and machinery, i'or 
newspaper, book, circular and other printed il- 
histrations, and are always rea< 
patrons in bringing their valuabJd disco"ei\yu 
i uto practical and profitable use. 

DEWEY & CO., 

United States and Foreign Patent Ag< nts, pub- 
lishers Mining and Scientific Press and Pacific 
Rural Press, *252 Market Street. Elei 
12 Front St., S. F. 



G2 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 26, 1883 



Irop and (flachijie iNorfc 



F. P. Bacon, Prea. 



C. L. Fours, Sec'y. 



The Globe Ironworks Co., 

Manufacturers and Repair 3rs of all kinds of 

MACHINERY AND IRON CASTINGS, 

AND BD1LDHRS OF 

Locomotives, Hoisting anfl Minim Matlinerr. Port- 
able, Stationery and Marine Engines. 

Office and Works— 222 and 224 Fremont St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
jtSTAerents for C. H. Baker's Mining Horse Power; 
Bishop's Mining Pump Apparatus; C. H. Baker's Quick- 
silver Feeder. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 
ROOT, NIELSON & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STEAM ENGINES, BOILERS AND ALL 
Kinds of Machinery for Mining Purposes. 

Flouring Mills, Saw Mills and Quartz Mills Machinery 
constructed, fitted up and repaired. 

Front Street, Between N and O Streets, 

BAORAHBHTO, CAL. 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works. 

Manufacture Iron Castings and Machinery 
of all Kinds at Greatly Reduced Rates. 

STEVENSON'S PATENT 

Mold-Board AMALGAMATORS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

First St.. between Howard & Folsom, S. F. 



California Brass Foundry, 

No. 125 First Street, Opposite Minna. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



All kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt 
Metal Castings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes, 
Sheathing Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steam- 
boat Bells and Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks 
and Valves, Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Coup- 
lines and Connections of all sizes and patterns, furnished 
with dispatch. Ha.PRJ.CES MODERATE. ^* 

J. H. WEED. V. KJNGWELL. 



California Machine Works, 

WM. H. BIRCH, 

Engineer and Machinist, 

119 Beale Street, San Francisco. 

Portable and Double Sawmills, Steam Engines, Flour, 

Quart/ and Minin g Machinery. BrucbVs Patent Rock Crusher 

PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

No 1 Cmnher, 4 tons per hour $450.00 

" g 6 " " " 625.00 

■• 3 " 8 ' 925.00 

■• " 15001bs " " 150.00 

The Best Crusher in the Market and at the Lowest Prices. 
Power, Hydraulic Ram or Cylinder Elevators, Hand Power 
Hoists, for sidewalks any purpose, Saw Arbors and Mill 
Fittings. Repairing promptly attended to 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

O! all Blzes— from 2 to 60-Horse power. AJjo, Quartz 
Mills, Mining Pumps, Hoisting Machinery, Shafting, Iron 
Tanks, etc For sale at the lowest prices by 

J. HENDY, 49 and 61 Fremont Street, S. F. 



THOMAS THOMPSON. 



THORNTON THOMPSON. 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

and 131 Beale St., between Mission and Howard, S. F. 

MANDFAOTURBRa OF CASTINGS OF BVHRY BBBORIPTION. 



SILVER MEDAL AWARDED 

— AT — 

Mechanics' Fair, 1882 

— FOR— 

Best Upright Engine and Boiler com- 
bined, Best Hoisting Engine and Boiler 
combined and Best Upright Engine in 
motion to 

W. H. 0MHEN, 



Engine 

109 & 111 Beale St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 




California Inventors HrlH 

anii Foreign Patent Solicitors, for obtaining Patents 
ami Caveats, Established in 1860. Their long experience as 
journalists and large practice as Patent Attorneys, enables 
them to offer Pacific < 'oast Inventors far better service than 
they can obtain elsewln-rc Send for free circulars of infor- 
mation. Office of the Mining in d Scientific Press and 
Pacific Rural Press, No. 252 Market St., Ban Francisco. 

Elevator, 12 Front St. 

„ThiB paper is printed, witn Ins: Manufac- 
tured by Cnarlea Eneu Johnson & Co., Sod 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch Offi- 
ces— 47 Rose St., New York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Chicago. Agent tor the Pacific Coaat— 
Joseph H. Dorety, 529 Commercial St. 8. F. 



COKE. PATENT. COKE. 

o 

This COKE is exclusively used by Prof. Thomas Price, In his assay office, by the Selby 
Smelting and Lead Co., Prescott, Scott & Co., Kisdon Iron and Locomotive Works and others in 
this city. Large supplies are regularly forwarded to consumers in Salt Lake and Nevada, to the 
Copper Queen Mining Co., Longfellow Copper Mining Co. and other consumers in Arizona. 

The undersigned are in receipt of regular supplies from Cardiff, Wales, and offer the COKE 
for sale in quantities to suit purchasers. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

316 California St., San Francisco. 




Berry & Place Machine Co., 

* PABKB & LACY. Proprietors. 




PABKE & LACY, Proprietors. 

No. S California Street, 

San Francisco, 

CAL. 

Importers and Dealers in every 
Variety of 

Wood and Iron Working Machinery, 




GARDNER 
GOVERNOR. 



STEAM PUMPS, 



pi Stationary. Portable and Hoisting Engines and Boilers 
' '.' Sawmills. Shingle Mills. Emery Wheels and Grind- 
erg, Gardner Governors, Planer Knives, Sand 
Paper in Roll b, together with a general line 
of Mining and Mill Supplies, includ- 
ing Leather Belting, Rubber Belt- 
ing Packing and Hose. 
43T Catalogues furnished on Application. £3 



Geo. W. Prescott, President. 
Irving M. Scott, Gen'l Manager. 



H. T. Scott, Vice-Pres't and Treas. 



Geo. \V. Dickie, Manager 
J. 0*B. Qunn, Secretary. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Office, 61 First St. | Cor. First & Mission Sts., S. F. | P. 0. Box 2128. 



BUILDERS OF 



STEAM, AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Agents of the Cameron Steam Pump. 

Home Industry.— All Work Tested and Guaranteed. 

Vertical Engines, Baby Hoists, Stamps 

Horizontal Engines, Ventilating Fans, Pans, 

Automatic Cut-off Engines, Rock Breakers, Settlers, 

Compound Condensing Engines, Self-Feeders, Retorts 

Shafting, Pullets, Etc., Etc. 

TRY OUR MAKE, CHEAPEST AND BEST IN USE. 

UNION IRON WORKS 



SKND FOR LATK UlKCl'I.AKS. 



Successors to PRESCOTT, SCOTT & C<> 



Send kor Late Circul/ 



TV^illiam Hawkins. 

(bUCCESSOR TO HAWKINS & CANTBELL). 

M^CIHIIIISrirli WORKS, 

210 and 212 Beale Street, bet. Howard and Folsom Sts., - - San Francisco. 

Manufacturer of 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES, 

FOR MINING AND OTHER PURPOSES. 

Also of the HAWKINS' PATENT ELEVATOR HOIST, tor Hotels, Warehouses 
and Public Buildings. 

Steam Engines and all Kinds of Mill and Mining Machinery. 



L. C. MARSHUTZ. 



T. G. CANTRELL 



national Iron Works, 

Northwest Cor. Main and Howard Sts., San Francieco, 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES 

At Greatly Reduced Prices. 

HOME INDUSTRY ! ALL. WORK TESTED AND GUARANTEED ! 

Stationary and Compound Engines, Flour, Sugar, Quartz and Saw Mills. Amalga 

ruattng Macnmes. 

CASTINGS AND FORGINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Sole Manufacturers of Kendall's Patent Ouartz Mills. 



Reliance Machine Works, 

CLOT & MEESE, 

Sole Licensed Manufacturers of the 

Medart Patent Wrought Rim Pulley 

For \bo Scutes of California, Orpa;on aod Nevada, and the Territories of Idaho, Washington, 

Mu-itana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Liffhtest, Strongest, Cheapest aud 

BeBt Balanced Pulley in the World. Also Manufacturers of 

pat. oct. as, lssi. SHAFTING, HANGERS AND APPURTENANCES. 

iRTSEND for Circular akd Pricr List. =?Sa 
Nos. 129 and 131 Fremont Street, ... SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




Corner Beale and Howard Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

W. H TAYLOR, Pres't. JOSEPH MOORE. Sup'l 

Builders of Steam Machinery 

IN ALL ITS BRAN0Q38, 

Steamboat, Steamship, Land 

Engines and Boilers, 

HIGH PRESSURE OR COMPOUND. 



STEAM VESSELS, of all kinda, built complete with 
Hulls of Wood, Iron or Composite. 

ORDINARY ENGINES compounded when ad- 
visable. 

STEAM LAUNCHES, Bargefl and Steam Tugs con- 
structed with reference to the Trade In which they are 
to be employed. Speed, tonnage and draft of water 
guaranteed. 

STEAM BOILERS. Particular attention given to 
the quality of the material and workmanship, and^none 
but first-class work produced. 

SUGAR MILLS AND SUGAR-MAKING 
MACHINERY made after the moBt approved plans 
Also, all Boiler Iron Work connected therewith. 

WATER PIPE, of Boiler or Sheet Iron, of any size 
made in suitable lengths for connecting together, or 
sheets rolled, punched, and packed for shipment ready 
to be riveted on the ground. 

HYDRAULIC RIVETING. Boiler Work and 
Water Pipe made by this establishment, riveted by 
Hydraulic Riveting Machinery, that quality of work 
being far superior to hand work. 

SHIP "WORK. Ship and Steam Capstans, Steam 
Winches, Air and Circulating Pumps, made after the 
most approved plans. 

PUMPS. Direct Acting Pumps, for Irrigation or City 
Water WorkB purposes, built with the celebrated Davy 
Valve Motion, superior to any other Pump. 




Galena Silyer & Copper Ores. 

The PACIFIC WATER JACKET SMELTERS embrace 
many features that are entirely new and of great practi- 
cal utility, which are covered by letters patent. 

No other furnaces can compare with these for dura- 
bility and in capacity for uninterrupted work. 

MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED of them are now run- 
ning on the Pacific Coast, giving results never before 
obtained as regardB continuous running, economy of 
fuel, grade and quality of bullion produced. Wo are 
preoared to demon Btrate by facts the claims here made. 

These Smelterg are Bhipped in a complete state, requir- 
ing no brick or stone work, e xcept that for the crucible, 
thus savin g great expense and loss of time in construc- 
tion. 

Complete smelting plants made to order of any capacity 
and with all the improvements that experience has sug- 
gested as valuable in this classof machinery. Skilled and 
experienced smelters furnished when desired to super- 
intend construe ion and running- of furnaces. Estimatos 
given upon application. Send for circular. 

RANKIN, BRAXTON & CO., 

Pacific Iron Works, San Francisco. Chicago 

and New Yo**k. 



IMHAUSER'S 

Watchman's Improved Time Detector, 

WITH SAFETY LOCK ATTACHMENT. 




INVENTORS, model maker, 

£58 Market St.. N. E. cor. Front, un-stairs, San Prancisco, 
Kxi»'i-tinfiiiii] machinery aud all kinds of models, tin, conner, 
and braug work, 



Mining Books. 



Orders for Mining and Scientific Books in general \ 
i>«- supplied through this office at published rates, 



■6-7-S0-S1.) 

Beware of Infringements. This Instrument is supplied 
with 12 keys for 12 stations. Invaluable for all concerns 
employing night watchmen. Send for Circulars to 

DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & CO., 

San Francisco, - California. 



Dewey & Co. US,,} Patent Agt's, 



Jult 28, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press 



NATIONAL COMPRESSORS and 




EDWARD A. RIX, Agent, 

18 and 20 Fremont Street, ..... San Francisco, Cal. 

IROIST A.KTID STEEL, WIRE HOISTING- ROPES. 



ORE 



WIRE R0 

BKODERICK&BASCOMROPECO. 



HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL ENGINES 

1 to lOO Eor^f* Power. 





KNIGHT'S I 
Mining Water Wheel 

IIVKJ 303 l.V IKK IN CAL. 



ORB AND 

Water Buckets. 

BELT 

Compressor p. 

MINERS' HORSE-WHIM 



< >>i. ||. .rw can eaelly h-lut over 1.000 rounds at ft depth i.l 500 fMt, The whim 

mainly built of wrought Iron. The bolitlng-drain la thrown out of guar by the 

Iotv, while tin- load la held In place with a brake by the man teodlnj tbfl 

Mi' K-'t The standard of the whim la bolted to In-d-tlmberr, thu- avoiding al) fram 

work. When required these whims are mado in aectioun to pack ou mule*. 

NATIONAL DUPLEX COMPRESSOR. 



w$hi$ 






H. P. GREGORY & CO., 

Dealers in Machinery and Supplies. 



The Kortimr's Injector Is the simplest, 
cheapest and best in rise. Will draft its 
own water, hot or cold, and food under 
varying 1 pressure. Send for Circular. 



Importers and 
Nos 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 



2 and 4 California Street, S. F. 




J. A. Fay A Co., Wood Work- 
ing Machinery. 

J lenient & Son's Machinists 
Tools. 

Blake's Steam Pumps. 

Perry's Centrifugal Pnrnps. 

Gould's Hand & Power Pumps 

Perrin's Band Saw Blades. 

Payne's Vertical and Horizontal 
Steam Engines. 

Williamson Bros. Hoisting En- 
gines. 

New Haven Machine Co. 's Ma- 
chinists' Tools. 

Otto Silent Gas Engines, 




Hoisting Engines of all Kinds. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

Sturtevant's Blowers and Ex- 
hausts. 
Judeon's Steam Governors. 
Pickering's Steam Governors. 
Tanite Co. Emery Wheels. 
Nathan & Dreyfus' Oilers. 
Korting's Injectors and Ejec- 
tors, 
Disston's Circular Saws. 
Frank & Co.'s Wood Working 
Machinery. 
New York Belting & Packing 
Cov's Rubber Belting, Hose, 
Packing, etc. 
Ballard's Oak Tanned Leather 
Belting. 




BLAKE STEAM PUMP. 
More Than 16,000 In Use. 






f 






w 




THE CONSUMERS' COMPANY. 

VULCAN B B, 

Black. Grlaaueci I*o-w<3L&i?, 

In kegn and caseB. The Best Low Grade Explosive in the market. Contains do Nitro 
tilycwriue. Superior to Judaon or any Elack Powder made. 

Is Unequaled for Bank Blasting & Railroad Work. 

VULCAN NOS. I, 2 AND 3, 

"**^i?( ' ^ ,ie Ht, r""Bent, Mot Uniform and best Nitio (Jljcerine Fawder inanu factured, a-i 
which we are prepared to furnish at vexj lowest priCcB. 

Caps and Fuse of all Grades at Bottom Rates. 
VULCAN POWDER CO., 

218 California St., San Francisco, ■ 




EXCELSIOR BLASTING POWDER, 

Manufactured by the 

EXCELSIOR POWDER COMPANY. 

This is no new, patent, non-explosivo Safety Powder, but tlio Genuine 
Standard Nitro Glycerine Powder, as safe to use and handle as any other Nitro 
Glycerine Powder manufactured. The fume^ and erases, common in iii.io-glyccrine 
powders, are destroyed, and do not leave the miner w'th headache or nausea. 

The powder is put up in cartridges of any eize to sutt the consumer, and it, 
exploded in the same manne' as all other high explosives; that is, by n^nns of 
cap and fuse, or by electricity. It is not claimed for this powder that it is a 
non-explosive, or safer than other miro-glycerine powder. All powder, and 
especially nitro-u'lvcerine Dowder, thouTd be handled carefully. The EXCEL- 
SIOR POWDER is as safe, and for atrength far surpasses any other powder on 
the market. Address all orders to 

EXCELSIOR POWDER COMPANY, 

Room 9, No. 3 California St., - San Francisco, CsU. 




JAS. LEFFEL'S TURBINE WATER WHEEL, 

The "Old Reliable," 

With Important Improvements, makimfjit the 

MOST PERFECT TURBINE NOW IN USE, 

Comprising the Largest and the Smallest Wheels, under both the Highest and 
Lowest head used in this country. Our new Illustrated Book Bent free to those 
owning water power. 

Those improving water power should not fail to write ua for New Prices, before 
buying elsewhere. New Shops and New Machinery are provided for making this 
Wheel. Address 

JAMES LEFFEL <& CO., 

Springfield, Ohio, and 110 Liberty Street, New Yorte City 
PARKE <fe IACY. General Agents, 21 & 23 FrBmnnt St.. S. IF. 

GOLD QUARTZ and PLACER MINERS' 

Silver Plated 

^^Js/L^^XuO-j^J^^^TXISTG- PLATES, 

JF"or Saving Gold. 
Every description of plates for Quartz Mills and Wet or Dry Placer Amal^a 
mator Machines made to order> corrugated or plain. 

OVER 2,000 ORDERS FILLED. 
The most extensive and successful manufacturer of these plates in the 
TJpited States. Will fill orders for delivery in Rocky Mountain and Pacific 
Coast Mining States at lower prices than any other manufacturer. 

O'd Mining Plates Replated. Old Plates bought, o 
gold separated for low percentage of result. 
SEND FOR PRICE LIST. - 

SAN FRANCISCO PLATING WORKS, 

653 & 655 Mission St., San Francieco, Cal. 
E.G. DENNISTON, Proprietor. 





Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 28, 1883 



Mining Machinery Depot, 

2 1 and 23 Fremont Street. S. F. 



NO. 7 IMPROVED 



AIR COMPKE8SOR 



With Adjustable Cut-off Poppet Valve Engine, and Forced Iron Crank Shafts. 



SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

Absolute certainty in the action of the valves at any speed. Perfect delivery of the air at any 
speed or pressure. The heating of the air entirely prevented at any pressure. Takes less water to 
cool the air than any other Compressor. 

Power applied to the best advantage. Access obtainable to all the valves by removing air chest 
cov jrs. Entire absence of springs or friction to open or shut the valves. No valve stems to break 
and drop inside -of cylinders. 

Have no back or front heads to break. The only Machine that makes a perfect diagram. No 
expensive foundations required. Absolute economy in first cost and after working. 

Displacements in air cylinder perfect. Showing less leakage and friction than our competitors 
and a superior economy of about 20 per cent. 

Small Sizes made in Sections not to Exceed 300 lbs. 



THE CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Sporting, Cannon, Mining, Blasting and 

HERCULES POWDER 

HERCULES POWDER will break more rock, is stronger, safer and better than any other 
Explosive in use, and is the only Nitro-Glycerine Powder chemically compounded to neutralize 
the poisonous fumes, notwithstauding bombastic and pretentious claims by others. 

It derives its name trora Hbroi'lbs, the most famous hero of Greek Mythology, who was gifted with superhuman 

Btreni^h. On one occasion he slew several giants who opposed him, and with one blow of 

liia club broke a high mountain from summit to base. 



No. 1 (XX) is the Strongest Explosive Known. 
No. 2 is superior to anv powder of that grad e. 

PATENTED IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE. 

ORDERS RECEIVED FOR HERCULES CAPS AND FUSE. 

JOHN F. LOHSE, SECY. 

Office, No. 230 California Street - - San Francisco, Cal. 

L. 51. STARR li, II. WALTER. 

/ETNA IRON WORKS, 

MANUFACT1 RERS OF 

IRON CASTINGS AND MACHINERY 

of all Kinds. 

MARINE, STEAM, AIR AND HYDRAULIC MACHINERY. 

Mining Machinery a Specialty. 

217, 219, and 221 FREMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

MALTEB, LIND & CO., Agents, 189 Broadway, New Yorfe. 




PROM 1-4 TO 10,000 lbs. WEIGHT. 

True to pattern, sound and solid, of unequaled strength, toughness and 
durability. 

Am invaluable substitute for forcings or cast-iron requiring three-fold 
strength. 

bearing of all kinds, Shoes, Dies, Hammerheads, Crosaheads for Loco- 
motives, eto. 

15,000 Crank Shafts and 10,000 Gear Wheels of this Steel now running 
prove ita superiority awr other Steel Castings. 

HRANK SHAFTS, SHOES, DIES and GEAJtlNC specialties. 

Circulars and Price Lists free. Address 

CHESTER STEEL CASTING CO., 

*"'»"■ rWKSTKR. 1»». 407 library St.. IM1I1 ,i I.cn'IU » 



Only "PEBBLE" Establishment. 




Muller's Optica) Depot, 

185 Montgomery St. near Bush. 
SrHCXA.IiX-2- FOB. 33 YBAStS. 



The ruoBt complicated c«sob of defect 
lve vision thoroughly diapuosod, fres ol 
charge. Orders by mail or express 
promptly attended to. 

Compound Astigmatic Lenses Mounted to 
Order. Two Hourt Notice. 



Dewey & Co. USg*'} Patent Agt's. 



EVERY FOOT WARRANTED. 



BELTING and PACKING. 

Ifxtra Quality Endless Belts, Steam and 

Suction Hose, Air. Oil and Brewers' 

Bose Car Springs, Valves, 

Gaskets, Etc.. Etc 

GOODYJGAR RUBBER CO. 



K. H. PEASE, Jtt. 
S. M. RUMYON, | 
5V7 & 579 MARKET ST. 



$1,000 CHALLENGE! 




- Agekts, 

San Francis go 



THE FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR, 

— OR— 

VANNING MACHINE. 

Over 400 are now n use, glvim; entire satisfaction. Saves from 40 to 100 per cent, more than aoy other Con- 
centrator in use, and concentration are clean from the first working. The wear and tear arc merely nominal. 

A machine can be seen m working order, and ready to make tests, at the office oV Hinckley, Spiers & Hayes, 220 
Fremont Street, 

To those intending to manufacture or purchase the so-calied "Triumph" Concen- 
trator, we herewith state: 

That legal advice has been given that all shaking motion applied to an endless traveling belt used for concen- 
tration of ores is an infringement on patents held and owned by the Frue Vanning Machine Company. 

That suit has been commenced in New York against an end-shake machine similar to the Triumph, and that as 
soon as decision is reached in the courts there, proceedings will he taken agai nst all Western nf ringements. 

That the patent laws make users of infringements responsible as well as makers, and the public is therefore 
warned that there is considerable risk in purchasing any end-Bbake machine until our various patents have been 
decided. 

That if there are those who for any reason prefer an end-shake machine, we cart manufacture and sell to such a 
machine of that description, as efficient as the Triumph, and at a lower price, and no liability for infringement will 
then be incurred by the purchaser. 

That wo Bhall protect ourselves against any one miking, selliug or using any maehiue infringing any of our 
patents. Patented July 9, 1867; May 4, 1869; Dec. 22, 1874; Sept. 2, 1879; April 27, 1880. Patents applied for. 

That we are, and have been, ready at any time, to make a com petitive trial againBt the Triumph, or any other 
machine, for stakes of $1,000. 

ADAMS & CARTER, Agents Frue Vanning Machine Company, 

Room 7. 109 California Street, - SAN FBANCISCO, CAL 

Nov. 6, 1082. 



Patented Oct. 11, '81. 




isriE-vniixrs 



CELEBRATED 



FURNACE, 

Working up to 94 percent of Fire Vssa; 

using 25 per cent less salt since 

July, 1882. 

Ita MUISNSK8 F01! HSU FOIS SAWS,"®* 

Or Furnaces Constructed. 

Address, 

R. A. NEVIN, Patentee. 

Y/Js (Box2361.) Sun Francisco, Cal, 




■TO- 



HYDRAULIC 



iEwElOSTEIRSz 



rpHE ABOVE (.'IT REPRESENTS OUR NUW IMPROVED GIANT, Willi 'IT 

•*- we recommend as beimrtho Best Hydraulic Machine over manufactured. 
They arc Simpler, Lighter, Cheaper akd More Easily Worked than any style 
heretofore made. The machine is folly protected by patents owned by us, and wc 
will guarantee protection to our customers. &p"Scnd for Circular and Price List. 

HOSKIN BEOS., 

JIA.iYSYIU.E, CALIFORNIA; 




An Illustrated Journal of 



BY DEWEY Si CO.. 
Publishers. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1883. 



VOLUME XLVII 
Number 5. 



Utilizing Lead Fumes. 

» irdinary oommeroial oxides of Lead have us- 
ually been manufactured by heating metallic 
lead in an oxidizing reverberatory or revolving 
furnace, or by heating white lead in bucd fur- 

naees to drive out oarbania acid and c bined 

It has l>een found, however, that the 
same oxides of lead may be manufactured more 
economically from the waste lead fumes of 
(ead smelting furnaces. The composition of 
waste lead fumes depends much upon the char- 
acter of the lead and of the lead ore being 
smelted, and also upon the kind of furnace 

used. 

An inventor has discovered that by subject- 
ing waste lead funics to the action of carbonate 
of soda, or caustic soda, the arsenious acid is 
made Boluble and the sulphate and sulphite of 
lead arc converted into compounds, from which 
by roasting may he produced commercial oxides 
of had. lly the roasting process the carbon is 
Oxidized and bmmed out, while the sulphurets 
and lead arc converted into sulphurous acid and 
Oxide of lead. This can lie done by mixing the 
waste lead fumes with soda ash and burning 
this mixture in an ordinary litharge furnace till 
the proper color is obtained. Then the mass is 
taken out and washed to separate the soluble 
part from the insoluble, and the oxide of lead is 
finely ground for the market. 

In the various samples of waste lead fumes 
analyzed, and in descriptions of analyses on rec- 
ord, it is found that waste lead fumes contain 
more or less carbon and sulphurets of lead, 
while much the greater portion of the lead 
present is in the form of sulphate, sulphite and 
oxide of lead. There is also generally present 
more or less arsenic—say from 7 to 20 per cent. 
In a sample of waste fumes from the smelting 
of argentiferous lead ore, was fonnd: 0.50 moist- 
ure, 1.50 carbon, 53. 79 sulphate of lead, 29.34 
■oxide of lead, '2.07 sulphurets of lead, 8.09 ar- 
senious acid, 0.005 silver, 2.28 oxide of zinc and 
1.825 antimonious oxide, oxide of iron, alumina 
and lime. 

The following is the modus operandi as car- 
tied out by the inventor: The waste lead fumes 
are made into a pulp by water and then boiled 
with a solution of caustic soda, or for econom- 
ical reasons, better, with a solution of carbonate 
of soda from one-half to one hour and longer, if 
much arsenic is present. The amount of car- 
bonate of soda, varies with the composition of 
the waste fumes. Each equivalent (151.5 parts) 
of sulphate of lead and (143.5 parts) of sulphite 
of lead, requires one equivalent (53 parts) of 
carbonate of soda; and to each equivalent (99 
(parts) of arsenious acid, one equivalent (53 
jparts^ of carbonate of soda, though less might 
he used, while more is unnecessary. 

For 1,000 pounds waste fumes of the above 
composition, should thus be used about 232 
pounds of carbonate of soda, or its equivalent 
of commercial soda ash. After boiling the in- 
soluble part is allowed to settle and the mother 
|iqnor is run off, and the arsenic may be elimina- 
ted from this, and the sulphate of soda gained 
,by evaporation and crystallization. The in- 
soluble part is washed well, and is then ready 
for the furnace. It is preferable to press it first 
in a filter press, and then place the pressed 
, cakes in the" furnace, where it is changed into 
litharge or red lead, according to the tempera- 
ture and time employed, After burning the ox- 
ide of lead is ground, and is then ready for the 
.market. 



The Lidgerwood Mine Hoist. 

The Lidgerwood portable hoisting engines, 
while fitted for pile driving, wharves, etc., are 
Specially adapted for mines anil quarries and for 
prospecting purposes. The patent friction 
drums are a decided improvement on the old 
latch engines for every kind of hoisting duty. 
They are quicker to manage and handle. The 
friction is composed of iron and wood, the wood 
being of the hardest kind, placed endwise of 
the grain to the wear, and will last for years 
with all kinds of hard duty. The hoisting en- 
gines arc of recent design, and contain all the 
improvements suggested by years of experience 
in this particular line. 

The design is of the smaller or dummy loco 
motive type, and all their connections, valves, 



single engines for convenience in backing down 
heavy lifts, getting oH' center, etc. Lubricator 
upon steam pipe, and oil cups upon cross heads, 
are also supplied. Each engine 19 furnished 
with gipsy or winch head upon one end "f drum 
shaft: also a flat faced band fly wheel upon crank 
shaft for any belt power duty required. 

The boilers are large, and are made of the 
best brands of iron and tubes, lawfully stamped, 
tested, etc. They have all fixtures complete, 
specially made for the purpose, viz: Improved 
safety valve, steam gauges, water gauges, gauge 
cocks, stop, check, blow and throttle valveB, 
three way exhaust cocks, to exhaust In or out 
of smoke stack, grates, fire-tight ash-pan, lire 
tools, smoke stack with cover, substantial cast- 
iron smoke-stack dome on top of boiler, etc., 
complete. The pumps are of simple and reliable 




SINGLE CYLINDER LIDGERWOOD 
steam passages, pistons, etc., are calculated, 
balanced and fitted for rapidity of action, econ- 
omy in use of fuel, durability, etc. Steel is 
used throughout for piston rods, valve stems, 
cross heads, crank, valve and pump rod pins. 
The cross head gibbs and connecting rod boxes 
are of the best composition. All journal bear- 
ings are filled with anti-friction metal. All 
wearing surfaces have proper provision to take 
up all loss motion, and are fitted with good oil- 
ing devices, etc. The gearing, being cast from 
cut wheel patterns, runs true, smooth, and 
wears well. Kvery part is fitted to the bed 
plates upon faced surfaces and secured by a 
superior quality of bolts, nuts and studs; steady 
pins are also used, and each engine can be en 
tirely taken apart and replaced again in exact 
line by ordinary intelligence. The cylinders 
are fitted with Russia sheet iron jackets, drain- 
age cocks, and a steam chest relief nock upon 



PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINE, 
form. They are driven direct from the crank 
shaft by an eccentric and long connection; and 
are also provided with all drainage and air (jocks 
for relief and cold weather uses. A suction valve 
and ten feet of suction hose are furnished with 
each engine. Between pumps and boilers on 
delivery pipes a check and stop-valve is used. 
This stop-valve is so arranged that if it is left 
shut off and the pump started to work, no acci- 
dent or damage will happen to either pumps or 
feed pipe connections, as the force of the water 
will open this valve itself and pass into the 
boiler. By this device many breakdowns are 
prevented. The Berry & Place Machine 
Co. , of this city, have recently accepted the 
agency of these hoisting engines for this coast. 
A number of styles are made, both of single 
and double cylinder. Some four styles are 
carried in stock here adapted for special 
work, 



The Mineral Exhibit. 

A creditable mineral display will l,i_- made at 
tin- State Mining Bureau this mouth, although 
the assistance it was hoped would be rendered 
was not by any means liberal. Only live coun- 
ties in the State contributed money, mineral 
and cases for the separate county displays. 
These were Butte, Mono, Inyo, San Bernardino 
and Tuolumne, from Inyo county, particu- 
larly, came a very creditable and extensive lot 
of minerals. This is due, no doubt, to the con- 
stant reminders the Inyo Indepemlent gave the 
people, and to the perseverance ofCapt, J, M, 
Keeler, who greatly interested himself in the 
matter. 

Aside from this, the amount collected from 
the public by the citizen's committee was insig- 
nificant, although Mr. J. Z. Davis, who has al- 
ways been generous to the Mining Bureau, 
headed the list with 82.50, followed by Capt. 
Mel lonald with $50. But here the matter prac- 
tically stopped. People who were asked to 
contribute to an exposition of mineralsdu ring the 
Conclave thought it was a matter for the State, 
and not for private individuals to carry out. 
This view was so prevalent that the idea of rais- 
ing any suitable amount of money from the pub- 
lic has been practically abandoned. 

The Mining Bureau funds were at a low ebb; 
and not withstanding the appropriation by the 
Legislature of $3000 per year, for two years, in 
addition to the income from taxes under the 
organic act, the State Mineralogist states that 
the expenses exceed the income. Therefore, 
the citizens' committee was appointed when it 
was proposed to get up the exposition. 

It was hoped this committee would be able to 
relieve the Bureau, but it has not done so. 
Thanks to the three years' work already done, 
however, a good showing of minerals will be 
made, and the Bureau is now closed temporarily 
while preparations are going on. 

Aside from the minerals which have been sent 
by the respective counties mentioned, a 
large number of miscellaneous minerals have 
been collected for this special exhibition. These 
counties have their own cases and minerals, the 
State Mineralogist taking care of and arranging 
the collections. We visited the Bureau this 
week and saw that a good display of minerals 
and ores would be made, though it is by no 
means as large as should be the case in the cen- 
ter of a mining region like this. Nothing but 
lack of money prevents a display that would do 
the State credit. We have plenty of minerals, 
but it takes time and labor to collect and ar- 
range them. 

The Los Angeles Herald says : The owners 
of the King mine, at Calico, held a meeting yes- 
terday at the Calico Union, and the Oro Grande 
Mining Companies, Temple Block, and received 
the report of the President, Colonel Markham, 
of the operations of the comjiany siuce the first 
of March last, when the mill commenced run- 
ning on the King ore. The ore proved so rich 
that additional amalgamating pans were re- 
quired, and were placed in position last month, 
so that the full capacity of the mill has not been 
obtained, except for the past month. How- 
ever, it appears that after paying all expenses 
the company is in a fine condition, and yester- 
day declared a dividend of $16,000. The mill 
is now running on average ore, not selected 
for richness, and turns out 8,"0,000 a month, 
with ten stamps, which is good enough for any- 
body, 



06 



Mining and 'Scientific Press. 



[August 4. 1883 



CORRESPONDENGE. 



Mines of Stockton Hill, Mohave County, 
Arizona. 

Editors Press: — Having lately returned from 
visiting some of the most promising mines of 
this district, and knowing that the Mining and 
Scientific Press takes a lively interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the mining industry, and is 
looked upon as the most valuable medium of in- 
formation in mining affairs, I will improve a 
leisure hour in dropping you a line. This, as 
most of your readers are undoubtedly aware, is 
an old district. Away backinthe "60's,"when 
this country was a terra incognita; and a trip 
into its mountain fastnesses was environed by 
every danger — the toilsome march across the 
trackless desert, in the face of desiccating winds 
thatfanned the weary adventurerlikeablast from 
the tweers of Hades; when to lose a canteen or 
miss a spring was to die, calling, like Dives, for 
one drop of water to cool the parched tongue; 
when every bowlder and every cluster of mes- 
quite was liable to ambush a treacherous, mer- 
ciless foe — a few hardy adventurers, crossing 
the country from California, and coming down 
from among the silver mines of Nevada, discov- 
ered unmistakable evidences of a prolific min- 
eral-bearing section, and located the Wallapai 
mining district. Many of the original locators, 
after braving every danger, enduring every 
hardship, and having "sowed that others might 
reap," have sealed their devotion with their 
lives, and now sleep on its rocky hillsides. But 
their places have always been hTled by others 
no less willing to stake their all on, and with no 
less faith in, the ultimate outcome of the dis- 
trict. I have long wished to visit this district, 
of which I have for years heard so much, and, 
coming down the A. & V. road a few days since, 
and finding myself at the embryo town of King- 
man, within a few miles of Stockton Hill, I re- 
solved to gratify myself, and have 

A Look at its Mines. 

A pleasant ride of some seven miles (per 
buckboard) up a gradual rise, and I found my- 
self at the foot of the hill immediately below 
the little mining town of Stockton, and then a 
short walk of half a mile up a new grade just 
completed by Mr. (Springer, of the "Cupel," 
and I am in Stockton, a veritable mining camp, 
scattered irregular, with no attempt at streets 
or corner lots, accommodating itself to the in- 
equalities of the surface. We have seen its 
prototype on many a mountain side. The snug 
cabin behind the cedar, the inevitable forge, the 
spring in !the gulch, and that invaluable but 
unappreciated quadruped, the burro, nipping 
the grass among the rocks, a-looking wistfully 
in at the cabin door for any stray morsel that 
might come its way. And here are 
Bearded. Manly Men. 

v\ e have seen their prototypes before, men 
who have confronted dangers, combatted ob- 
stacles, battled with the forces of nature, until, 
vulcanized in the tires of experience, they have 
(perhaps unconciously) become the true pioneers 
of our civilization. While in Kingman I met a 
gentleman acquainted in the country, and on in- 
quiry was informed that, among the valuable 
properties of the districts, the cluster of mines 
owned by the Grey Bros, was, perhaps, the 
most conspicuous, and was advised to call on 
them on my arrival at Stockton. I also learned 
that the celebrated "Blue Bell" and "Miners 1 
Hope," of which I heard flattering reports 
while in distant portions of the Territory, be- 
longed to these gentlemen. On my ar- 
rival I lost n o time in calling on th em , 
and was agreeably surprised to find in 
them old Mexican acquaintances of whom I 
for years lost sight. I remember a Mr. Thom 
as a bny, as a Comstock miner of twenty years 
ago, and afterwards as a pioneer of Eureka and 
rioche, and Mr. Robert Grey, as an experi- 
enced Nevada silver miner, associated with Mr. 
.1 ohn B. McGee, in the White Pine days. 
These gentlemen kindly consented to escoit me 
through the mines, and the following morning, 
accompanied by Mr. Thomas Grey, I started on 

My First Day's Trip. 
I will endeavor to give your readers the result 
as briefly and lucidly as possible. Our first 
visit was to the Cupel, a mine owned by 
Sprauner, Scanly & Co., of your city, and under 
the management of Mr. Springer. At the pres- 
ent, no developments are being made, as Mr. 
Springer is actively engaged in timbering the 
main shaft, which is down some seventy feet, 
finishing his hoisting appliances, etc., prepara- 
tory to active operations in the near future. 
They have a tine house just erected for the ac- 
commodation of employes, a substantial build- 
ing over shaft, stables, etc., and everything 
about the mine looks like business. Mr. 
Springer has had many obstacles to contend 
with, but is energetically overcoming them, and 
is evidently "the right man in the right place." 
There are old workings on this mine that we 
did not explore, among them a shaft 150 feet 
deep. I learn from disinterested parties, that 
under the old inconvenient mode of working, 
§150,000 have been extracted from this mine. 
We next visited the 

Fountain Head, 
A mine owned by the Grey Brothers. This 
mine is situated on the noi-th side of the mount- 
ain, south from Cupel canyon, and one fourth 
of a mile due west from the Cupel mine. It is 
a fifteen hundred-feet location, with a general 



trend of northwest by southeast, and a slight 
westerly dip. The vein matter (gangue) of this 
mine is not less than twelve feet, and the ore 
vein, as shown in the two shafts, 1,000 feet 
apart, is three feet in width. Shaft No. 1, 200 
feet from southerly bounds, is down thirty feet; 
and shaft No. 2, S00 feet northerly, is fifty-five 
feet in depth, the vein in one being almost a 
fac-simile of that in the other. The ore of this 
mine, of which there are some fifty tons on the 
dumps, carries about twenty-five per cent lead, 
and averages from actual working tests §40 per 
ton in silver, with a small percentage of gold. 
The Fountain Head is a contact vein, lying be- 
tween granite and porphyry. At the northerly 
end of the mine, a fine spring of water has been 
developed. Going almost due west, and climb- 
ing the mountain some half mile, we come to 
the 

Blue Bell. 
Another mine owned by the Grey brothers. 
This is another immense ledge, boldly plowing 
the country rock, and cropping at intervals its 
its entire length (1,500 feet). This mine has 
considerable surface development, crosscutting, 
etc., plainly demonstrating that it is a monster 
in size, the vein matter being not less than 
twenty feet in width. Four hundred feet from 
the southerly boundary a shaft has been sunk 
sixty feet, all in ore. There are about fifty tons 
of ore on the dump of this shaft. One thousand 
feet northerly on the ledge from shaft 1 is shaft 
No. 2, twenty-five feet in depth. The ore vein in 
this shaft is about two and one-half feet in 
width, and there are some fifteen tons on the 
dump. The ore of the Blue Bell is a chloride, 
and averages about $75 in silver, with some $20 
per ton in gold. Assorted ores from this mine 
have been reduced at distant reduction works 
(San Francisco, and Pueblo, Col.) that have 
reached much higher figures. The formation is 
the same as that of the Fountain Head — what 
miners call "friendly" rock, easily worked. A 
company owning this mine and a twenty stamp 
mill in a convenient location need have no fears 
for its financial future. 

The Charlotte, 
A mine also owned by the Grey brothers, and 
situated about one mile in a southwesterly di- 
rection from the Blue Bell, and on the 
western slope of the range, near Todd 
basin, consists of two parallel veins, some 
seventy-five feet apart, within the boundaiies 
of the location. The widest stratum is about ten 
and a half feet in width. The ore is a chloride, 
carrying no appreciable quantity of lead, and, 
assorted, averages about $175 per ton. This 
mine has been utilized by the Grey brothers as 
a "chloriding" mine, i. e., a mine that could 
always be relied on for a "grubstake," as where 
a few hundred dollars could be extracted on 
short notice, to meet any financial emergency. 
Outside parties, to whom the mine has been 
leased, are at present engaged in working it, 
and a few days since shipped a carload of ore 
to Albuquerque, N. M. Leaviug the Charlotte 
and following the trail almost due north, about 
a mile, we arrive at 

The "Alpha." 
This mine is owned by Messrs. Cole & Caffery, 
two energetic, practical miners. These men, 
instead of waiting for "something to turn up," 
are very busily engaged in turning up a very 
fine mine. They have at present in main work- 
ing shaft attained a depth of 120 feet. The pay 
ore in shaft from surface down will average 
about three and one-half feet. Like other 
mines in vicinity, the gangue is very much 
wider. The Alpha produces some very high 
grade ores, assays of selected samples going into 
the thousands, the average of entire pay stratum 
going in the vicinity of $100 in silver with a re- 
spectable percentage in gold. Messrs. Cole & 
Caffery, while sinking main shafts, are extract- 
ing some ten tons per week, and are at present 
shipping their ores by A. & P. R. R. to Pueblo 
Col. I learn that my old friend, M. P. Collins, 
formerly of San -lose, is the fortunate owner of 
the extentions of the Alpha. Having taken a 
lunch with the Alpha boys, we pressed our 
way due north some half mile, and arrived at 
the 

Silver Monster. 

This ledge, as regards size, is appropriately 
named, and is indeed a monster. There are 
t<\'o prominent locations on the ledge, besides 
several extensions. The Cincinnati, owned by 
a syndicate of New York capitalists, known as 
the Fairfield and Cincinnati Company, and the 
Silver Monster, owned by the Grey Brothers. 
The Cincinnati, fifty feet from the line of Silver 
Monster, has a shaft 150 feet in depth. In this 
shaft three crosscuts have been to the hanging, 
one at a depth of fifty, one at the depth of 100, 
and one at the bottom of the shaft, all in ore. 
The Silver Monster has a shaft, thirty-five feet 
in depth, in ore. I would not attempt, even 
ajiproximately, to give the width of this ledge; 
as its name indicates, it is a monstu 1 . The ores 
of this ledge, while of immense quantify, are of 
heavy galena, low grade, and undoubtedly of a 
refractory nature. Turning to the right, and 
following the comb of the mountain towards 
home a walk of half a mile brings us to what is 
usually conceded by all as being the finest pros- 
pective mine in Northern Arizona. 
The Miner's Hope. 
This is another ledge of immense size, the min- 
eral formation being not less than twenty feet 
in width. It is situated on the crest of the 
mountain west of the Cupel, and crosses the 
summit obliquely, cropping boldly far down on 
either side. It has been opened by shaft, at 
obout the center of the claim, to a depth of 
seventy feet. The pay vein, as shown, the en- 



tire depth of shaft, is three feet wide, and aver- 
ages §90 per ton, in gold and silver, ( under the 
old, expensive and inconvenient facilities for 
disposing of ores. Over $5,000 have been al- 
ready realized from ores taken from this mine. 
The Miner's Hope is admirably situated in re- 
gard to working facilities, as it can be easily 
opened by tunnels or drifts running in on the 
ledge. This is certainly a most flattering pros- 
pect for a magnificent mine, and I think I haz- 
ard nothing in prophesying that in the near 
future, among the very first mines of the coast 
will be mentioned the Miner's Hope, of Stock- 
ton Hill, Mojave Co., Arizona. Descending 
the mountain, on the north side of Cupel canyon , 
as we near home we come to the 

Pure Metal, 
A vertical ledge, in the same formation as the 
others described, and holding the same general 
course. While having a big formation, the ore 
vein proper is of a width of about three feet, 
and is, as its name indicates, a vein of pure 
metal, running about eighty per cent in lead, 
and carrying about twenty -five dollars per ton 
in silver. New Mexican parties are at present 
negotiating for 1,000 tons of ore from the Pure 
Metal. 

The Miners of Stockton Hill 
Have, since the location of the district, labored 
under every discouragement and disadvantage 
incident to life in a mining camp isolated from 
the world as this has been. All the necessaries 
of life were to be had only at fabulous prices. 
Parties looking for mining properties were loth 
to undertake a journey fraught with so much in- 
convenience, not to say peril; and parties visit- 
ing the district were appalled at its isolation, 
and deterred from embarking in mining enter- 
prises where such formidable obstacles presented 
themselves. Again, ores, in order to leave even 
a small margin of profit to the miners, must 
needs have been of fabulous richness. But the 
spirit of progress has smitten the desert with its 
iron wand, and everything is changed. The iron 
horse now shrieks at the foot of Stockton hill; 
provisions, powder, tools, machinery, and every- 
thing essential in the development of a mining 
district can now be had at prices ridiculously 
low, in comparison; lumber sawn from the mills 
of San Francisco mountains, can be delivered 
at a point sevenmiles from Stockton hill ata cost 
of about twenty-five dollars per thousand; coal 
from the mines of Gallup, N. M., at $10 per 
ton. While small quantities of ore are often 
found of fabulous richness, the great mass of 
the ores, as in every other district that any of 
us have ever visited, are what we have been 
used to call "low grade," is from §40 to :?80 per 
ton. And certainly, what I have already seen 
satisfies me, beyond a doubt, that the quantity 
of this character of ore is practically, without 
limit. The character of the country rock 
vouches for the presence of an ample water 
supply, even ignoring Oak creek, within five 
miles of the principal mines. Any miner can 
see from the "friendly" character of the coun- 
try rock, that mining will be comparatively 
inexpensive, and it requires no prophetic vision 
to see, in the near future, a brilliant prospect 
for the mines and miners of Stockton Hill. 

C. C. B. 



Oregon Nickel. 

Editors Pkkss:— Permit me to reply to Mr. 
Lovelock's article in your last issue. 1 am per- 
sonally acquainted with Mr. Wm. S. Bell, part 
owner of the mines referred to, and showed 
him my results. He was so much pleased that 
he wished me to work some of his ore; and 
since then, his partner, Mr. Curtis of Oakland, 
has informed me that he expects to receive 
four hundred pounds for that purpose. Mr. 
Lovelock must know that a single smelting of 
Mr. Bell's ore would nnt produce metallic 
nickel, but speiss (nickel arsenide), which would 
have to undergo other treatments before me- 
tallic nickel could be obtained. No furnace of 
" peculiar design " would effect this result. If 
Mr. Lovelock will examine the " several bars 
of nickel smelted from the ore as taken from 
the ledge," he will find them to be spuiss, not 
metallic nickel. Mr. Bell told me he had made 
a number of experiments, but had not succeeded 
in obtaining metallic nickel, except by reducing 
the oxide obtained by chemical treatment. He 
showed me a small button obtained in this way, 
which weighed a few grains. The ore from 
which I obtained the first bar of metallic 
nickel produced on this coast was garnier- 
ite from Oregon. This bar is now in possession 
of Edson Adams, Esq. , of Oakland, the owner 
of the mine. I have a process especially adapted 
to nickel ores containing sulphur, arsenic and 
antimony, which I hope to prove to Messrs. Bell 
& Curtis to be the most economical and prac- 
tical method foi working their ore. 
Yours respectfully, 

Geo. J. Roi'kwell. 

San Francisco, Cal., July 25, 18S3. 

New Mill Stakted Ur. — On last Saturday 
morning the new mill lately completed on the 
Premium mine was started up for the first time. 
The mill machinery was made at the Greenville 
Iron Works, and is as thorough in finish as it is 
complete in detail. The owners of this mine are 
all working men. During the past five years 
they have patiently and steadily worked to de- 
velop their property. They did not attempt to 
build a mill till they had first satisfied them- 
selves that there was ore enough to warrant 
,uch a step, and it is to be hoped that their most 
sanguine expectations may now be more than 
realized. A. A. McKenzie is amalgamator. — 
Greencilk Bulletin. 



Conveying "Water to Mines. 

In the Mint Director's report is a chapter on 
Nevada county, from which we take the follow- 
ing extract; 

The water supply of the Eureka Lake and 
Yuba Canal Co. is the most extensive of any 
company in the State. It consists of a system 
of ditches aggregating in length about 200 miles, 
conveying the water from various sources of sup- 
ply high up in the mountains; a series of stor- 
age reservoirs, three or four in number, located 
at an elevation of 0,000 feet above the sea level, 
holding aud furnishing water during the sum- 
mer months, when the supply of the streams is 
diminished or cut off; also a number of distrib- 
uting reservoirs, so situated near the points of 
delivery that they may receive the water from 
the ditches, and distribute it as desired for use. 

The principal and largest of the storage reser- 
voirs is the Eureka, or French Lake, a natural 
lake across whose outlet a dam has been raised. 
producing a reservoir of large capacity. The 
next is the Faucherie, lying about 000 feet be- 
low, and about two miles from the Eureka. The 
third and fourth are the Weaver Lake reser- 
voirs, which are situated on one of the tribu- 
taries of Middle Y'uba. 

Of all these reservoirs, the French is the most 
important. It was originally a mountain lake 
of great depth, and contained a large body of 
clear water. A substantial dam, built of blocks 
of granite, with a facing of plank, was con- 
structed across its outlet in 1858-59. This dam 
is about 250 feet long from bank to bank of the 
gorge in which it is built. Its base, measured 
along the course of the stream, is S9 feet; its 
height 6S4 feet above the foundation, and 62 
feet above the bottom of the outlet, which is an 
arched sluiceway, traversing the structure, the 
discharge being regulated by gates. The area 
of the reservoir, when full, is about 337 acres, 
and its estimated capacity 601,000,000 cubic 
feet. 

The Faucherie reservoir forms an area of 13!) 
acres, with an estimated capacity of 170,000,000 
cubic feet. The Weaver Lake reservoirs also 
have large capacities for storing water for use in 
the summer season. The aqueducts, consisting 
of ditches, flume, or pipe, aggregating in length 
more than 200 miles, are capable of delivering 
at various points S,S00 miner's inches in wet 
weather, or 4,000 in dry weather, each inch 
amounting in 24 hours to 2,260 cubic feet. This 
company also have 16 smaller or distributing 
reservoirs at various points along the ridge. 
The cost of these reservoirs and aqueducts can- 
not be accurately ascertained, but it does not 
fall short of #1,250,000. 

The average annual expenses of the company's 
ditch and water property is about #85,000. Con- 
siderable pains have been taken to show the 
vast outlay of money in opening and equipping 
these large mining properties, owing to the fact 
that public attention in California has been 
drawn to them so largely in the past two or 
three years. 

Another Gigantic Mining Scheme, — There 
are at present in Oroville, our former Congress- 
man, the genial John K. Luttrell, and the 
eminent engineer, A. VY. Yon Schmidt. This is 
the gentleman who built the dry dock at Hunt- 
er's Point, who blew up Blossom Rock, and who 
drove off the robbers who stopped the Qroviile 
and Quincy stage some years since. These gen- 
tlemen are there in the interest of a huge mining 
scheme, which contemplates the turning of 
Feather river, the mining of its bed for several 
miles, the mining of Carpenter's Flat to its bed- 
rock, which has never yet been favored, and 
the establishment of a vast water power, suffi- 
cient to turn all the manufacturing machinery 
in the State, ami supply Marysvillc, Sacra- 
mento, Stockton, San Francisco and intermediate 
towns with water. That is, they can do .ill 
that if they can build a dam that will stand the 
Hood pressure of the Feather river. We have 
not hoard the opinion of Mr. Von Schmidt on 
the proposition ; but as he is an eminent engi- 
neer who has been successful in all that Ik: has 
undertaken, wc should regard it as practical, 
however doubtful it may be about its proving 
profitable as a mining operation. A dam to 
hold the waters of the Feather river will cost a 
large sum, and the question to be considered is 
whether sufficient can be realized to render the 
work profitable, after the practicability of the 
work has been decided upon. — Butlv Record, 



New Mining Decision. — The Secretary of the 
Interior has decided in the case of the Rob Roy 
mineral lode, Helena, Montana, that where two 
applications are made, one of which has been 
abandoned, the ground in question comes within 
the purview of the second application, and is 
subject thereto. Previous to this decision, it 
has been held by the Department, in case of the 
abandonment of the land in controversy, the 
abandoned tract should revert to the public do- 
main. In the case of the "Bobtail vs. the Cale- 
donia," in Whitewood Mining District, Dead- 
wood, Dakota Territory, the Secretary decides 
that after the claimant has obtained a judgment 
in his favor in a court of competent jurisdic- 
tion, he is at liberty to take the necessary steps 
pointed out by the statute to obtain a patent. 
He need not wait until the time for claiming an 
appeal to a higher court has expired. He may 
proceed subject to beingagain stayed by appeal; 
but if the appeal is taken the steps which he 
had taken subsequent to the judgment toward 
obtaining a patent are held to be valid, if lie lie 
finally successful in the higher courts. 



Ai G\ i 1, 1883.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



>j 



I^egh/^ical Progress. 



Heated Bearings. 

A wiit'-riti an Eastern mechanical jouurnal 
'After all i! 

1 td.it it tbey oan be 

kept clean ana dirt and dust, then 

would be Imi heating <-i bearings than there i*. 

A bearing ma\ tun fol ith^ and be kept 

nice and oool, and all at one* take a notion to 
heat .iinl bother, after a general waking np has 
taken place by tin- parting "f on 

tnd then be set in order by just cleaning 
■ »ut the bearing by taking ad wash 

■ j, n iter 

made a little soapy will da very veil, and in 

nr.ii) cases it just the thing, where the dripping 

will pot Interfere with tin. machinery or belting. 

The usr >>i plumbago or lamp black in oil I never 

uj implicit faith in. I like t'» have .i 

hearing heat after tl. , u i. babbitted, 

• little, for then 

troublee, U it only Uvea through 

i heating without injury; otherv 

apart the bearing and ecrap • till an 

even pn and then try 

again. I like this Using a Uttle "il at a time 

from .»n nil cup that contains an oil that has got 
dy t" it, an- 1 alter it baa been m 

to tall into the drip pan fur that purpose. 

When there is danger from heating, a piece of 

melt ami 

run into the box when heated from thi ■■ i, i 
In taking dowi injg Bhafting or ma- 

chinery of .my kind, if the bearings are first 

■ itly cleaned, when replaced, nine times 
"ut of ten they will n.»t trouble, even though 
their caps ha rowed down too hard, 

or the whole f< hi to hear upon some 

particular spot. It is astonishing how, in some 
places, a bearing will run all its lifetime with- 
out any trouble in the least, and perhaps where 
the whole strain of the main belt is brought to 
bear, while at the loose end of another shaft 
they ha v.- had mi. re or less trouble from the very 
first. The lathe man's work may, in this ease, 
have something to do with it: the tile, instead 
of the cold water finish, may have taken the 
work out of round, and left the Surface to jump 
and pound, and out the bearings out. Heated 
bearings from any of these causes can only be 
found by careful examination. Bring a rest as 
near the Bbaft as possible, am! see if it remains 
the same distance from the surface while revolv- 
ing. If it does, it is all right at this point; then 
test in the same way on the other side, to see if 
the shaft is both circular and straight. By 

Ol a lever and a short, hearing for its ful- 
crum, the looseness of the shaft in its bearing is 
determined, and itw mechanical defects rer 
titled." 



How to Recognize Good Wood. 

Rankine says that there are certain appear- 
ances characteristic of good wood, to what 
class soever it belongs. In the same species of 
wood that specimen will in general be the 
Strongest and most durable which has grown 
the slowest, as shown by the narrowness of the 
annular rings. The cellular tissue, as seen in 
the medullary rays [when visible), should be 
hard and compact. The vascular or Hbrous tis- 
sue should adhere firmly together, and should 
show no wooliiiess at a freshly cut surface; nor 
should it ch.g the teeth of the saw with loose 
fibers. If the wood is colored, darkness of color 
is in general a sign of strength and durability. 
The freshly cut surface of the wood should be 
firm and shining, and should have somewhat of 
a translucent appearance. In wood of a given 
species the heavy specimens are in general the 
stronger and the more lasting. Among the 
resinous woods, those having the least resin in 
their pores, and among non-resinous woods 
those which have least sap or gum in them, are 
in general the strongest and most lasting. Tim- 
ber should be free from such blemishes as 
"clefts," or cracks radiating from the center; 
"cup shapes,' or cracks which partially separate 
one layer from another, "upsets," where the 
fibers have been crippled by compression, 
"wind galls," or wounds in a layer of wood, 
which have been covered and concealed by the 
growth of subsequent layers over them, and 
hollow or spongy places in the center or else- 
where, indicating the commencement of decay. 
Manufacturi r and Builder, 

A One-Wheeled Buggy. 

A Chicago man has invented a single- 
wheeled carriage. The vehicle has shafts 
which are so fastened to the horse that it 
can neither tip nor upset unless the animal 
should fall. The seat and box are behind 
the wheel. The advantage claimed for this 
novel contrivance is. that it can be hauled 
on any path wide enough to accommodate a 
horse. The plain inference is, that as it will 
carry a load, it would be an admirable substi- 
tute for the pack-mule on mountain trails, where 
greater speed can be obtained on the descending 
grade, with the driver borne along in comfort. 
The public will have greater or less confidence 
in the invention, as the case may be, after' wit- 
nessing its performance.— A^. Y. Tribune. 

In reference to the above, the Call of the ISth 
inst. contains the folio wiug: 

" Having seen an article in the Call, taken 
from the Chicago Tribune, in regard to a one- 
wheeled buggy, let me say that in February, 
*881, I saw a one- wheeled buggy in Cambria, 



San Luis Obispo county, which the inventor 

called a horse velocipede. Bo I think that » «1- 

Ifornia can claim the honor, if such th< 

□tion. It had strong shafts, n 

og a.s would prevent its being turned 

over, unless the hone was thrown down. The 

placed directly over the wheel. v„ T 

A ha \ .ill < !or 

ton* Cambria, San Luis Obispo county. 1 am 
sspeotfutty, h. 8, v *-, s"i.> &&." 

Wider Steel Rails Needed. 

Mi Reuben Well ■ hanic ol the 

Louisville and Nashville railroad, at to 
meeting, at * hi. 
bimself as foil 

■ Is, it is 
a question whether a wider ton to the rail 
would uotadd proportionately to the durability 

parts. Within ,i t.'u yeaj 
largely increased the weight on the wh< 

irly doubled it, but have col w id 
ened the rail, u find the 

■■■■ ear of both i been increased pi o| ionately. 

Il th< |.ai t of t In- 1 1 ■ a.t that now pro .... 

the i'ail could also ho upon the rail 

an.lcan\ its proportion ol the load, the dura- 
bility of the wheel, as regards the natural wear 
of its face or tread, would be increased as much, 
perhaps, .is twenty per cent, with a proportion- 
al.- increase in the durability of the rail. 
The beei shape for the flange and tread of 

the wheel and for the inner edge of the rail are 

questions about which there is muoh diversity 
of opinion among those best informed on the sub- 
jeot Scarcely any two wheel manufacturers 
make the same shape of the llange and face of 
the wheel precisely alike, and there is no equal 
variation in the curve lines of the edge of the 
rails against which the Manges have their bear- 
ing. 

I hesc matters, it seems to me, are of sulfi- 
cient importance to warrant a thorough investi- 
gation. We ought to know whether any im- 
provement can be made or whether the present 
variety is as good in practice as .uniformity 
would be. 



SeiEJMTIFIQ P^OGf^ESS. 



Alloys of metals are often difficult to make, 
and very small quantities greatly affect alloys. 
The presence of l-30000th of a pound of anti- 
mony in a pound of melted lead increases the 
rapidity with which the lead oxidizes and burns. 
Lead which contains more than 1 -14000th of its 
weight of copper is unfit for the manufacture of 
white lead. Der Tec hniker say s gold with an 
alloy of 1 -2000th of lead is extremely brittle. 
Copper with £ per cent of iron has only 40 per 
cent of the electric conductivity of pure copper. 
Nickel was regarded as a metal which could be 
neither rolled, hammered nor welded, until it 
was found that the addition of 1- 1000th of mag- 
nesium, or of 3- 1000th of phosphorus, makes it 
malleable. Some varieties of cast steel are ex- 
ceedingly brittle, but the addition of l-12th of 
1 per cent of magnesium makes them malleable. 
At the Paris Exposition of 1878, a great differ- 
ence was found in the toughness of sheets which 
were made of Swedish puddled iron. The only 
difference which chemical analysis showed was 
that the good plates contained 20-100000ths, 
and the bad 2I-100000ths, of phosphorus. 

YELLOW Pine, hard finished in oil, is the 
rival in beauty of any wood that grows, not ex- 
cepting the costliest hardwoods. It is suscepti- 
ble of receiving and maintaining as high a de- 
gree of polish as any wood with which we are 
familiar, and as to durability, when thoroughly 
impregnated with oil, it may be said to be al- 
most everlasting. In such a condition it is im- 
pervious to even hot grease and other substances 
that leave an ineffaceable stain upon white pine, 
maple, and various other woods. Flooring for 
use under carpets should be largely sap, and 
when exposed either for inside or outside use, 
should be as near all heart as possible. For in- 
side trimming, wainscoting or panel work, the 
curly variety, which, by the way, can only be 
obtained in limited quantities, and ought to 
bring from $60 to 980 per thousand in any mar- 
ket, instead of only half that sum — is, in the 
writer's estimation at least, superior to either 
cherry or bird's eye maple. — N. W. Lumber- 
man. 



The Indianapolis Wooden-Dish Co. has just 
perfected a new machine for making wooden 
dishes. This machine takes the veneer from 
the veneer mill, cuts out the blank, shapes and 
scores it, folds it up, and takes the wire from 
the spools forming the staple, drives the. staple 
at each end of the dish, drives and clinches it, 
and throws the dishes off from the machine 
complete, at the rate of sixty per minute. The 
works have a capacity for turning out 200,000 
wooden dishes per day. 

Complicated Machines.— A writer in an 
Eastern journal says : "The tendency to com- 
plicate machines and make them universal, or 
machines of many kinds, is fast becoming ex- 
tinct. It has been usirally found to be a very 
much more costly way to produce work than 
with special machines made for one kind of 
work, or at least not many kinds of work, and 
then only when they were similar in their proc- 
esses and manner of production and operation. 

A JOURNAL B03 slightly on t of line or level 
will absorb a large amount of oil, and yet be 
continually hot, waste power by unnecessary 
friction, besides grinding and cutting the shaft. 
It will always pay to attend closely to such 
matters* 



Phenomena Attending a Total Solar 
Eclipse. 

t with the problem which 
astronomers an- at present endeavoring to solve, 
have doubtless wondered « by it was that Bcieo 
tiin . Kpeditions should be fitted out %\ 
expense and dispatched to theuttormo 

earth for the purpose of directing their 
instruments of precision for e few minutes at 
taole of the i ■ sling the sun. 

h it maybeadmitted thatsuchs | 
• mom is, in Itself, exceedingly interesting. 
But tl.- i i u ;.. i. ,,,. . than an 

■■ etaele in a total eclipse ol the 
Mm. They know thai fchi batons, 
the lumini 

sible i rvations of , or to gain any 
knowledge 'of his surroundings, and that these 
surroundings, in the highest degree into 
and wonderful, ar ly rendi red visible when 

the vast Hoods of light emitted by the miii are 

cut off by the interposition of the dark body of 

the i. The astonishing oharacter of the 

solar atmosphere then stands revealed to the 
eye of the astronomer, 

When the moon comes exactly beta 
earth and the sun, the whole of the in 
brilliant body of the sun which we ordinarily 
see is cut off Erom our view; but projecting be- 
yond the edges of the black circle formed by 
the moon, objects that might be taken for red 
flames are Been. These flames, protuberanci 
or prominences, as they are variously called, 
rarely show any flame-like motion, but in most 
cases remain unchanged in shape, until the re- 
turning sunlight, as the moon passes on, blots 
them from view. They exhibit a great diversity 
of striking and curious forms, resembling vari- 
ous trees, clouds, horns, tongues of flame, etc.; 
and although they appear small when compared 
with the size of the sun, their actual size is 
enormous, sonic being f>0,000 or even 100,000 
miles high, and proportionally broad. 

A close inspection shows that these singular 
prominences rise out of a scarlet ring of light 
surrounding the whole hidden sun. This fiery 
ring, which is in reality a section of a spherical 
shell around the sun, is called the " sierra." 
With the aid of the spectroscope, with which— 
iu improved forms — it has been possible to re- 
veal the red prominences even when there is no 
eclipse, and in full sunshine, it has been demon- 
strated that the sierra is composed of glowing 
gases, among which hydrogen predominates. 

These protuberances are eruptions of heated 
gas projected from the body of the sun; and as- 
tronomers have occasionally been fortunate 
enough to witness geyser-like eruptions of 
these gaseous meteors in the very act of erup- 
tion, the red columns of gas streaming upwards 
to the prodigious height of 100,000 or "200,000 
miles within a few minutes. While, however, the 
sierra and the proturberauces may be observed 
with the aid of the spectroscope when there is 
no eclipse, it is during a total eclipse, and 
especially during one of long duration — like 
that lately observed at Caroline island — that 
these wonderful objects can be observed and 
studied to the best advantage. 

Beyond the sierra, also, there are other 
singular objects which can only be seen during 
an eclipse. There is, for example, a zone of sil- 
very light surrounding the hidden sun outside 
the red disk of glowing gases, and these, radiat- 
ing out in all directions to astonishing dis- 
tances- -sometimes to the distance of six or 
eight times the apparent diameter of the sun, 
corresponding to an actual distance of several 
millions of miles— are the splendid rays of the 
corona. These are generally of a silvery hue, 
and taper off' at their extremities, gradually 
growing fainter as they recede from the sun, 
and making a most striking spectacle in the 
darkened heavens. 

What these rays may be, and what part they 
play in the economy of the sun, are still among 
the problems that have battled science to deter- 
mine. That they are governed by some law 
intimately connected with the condition of the 
solar orb itself, is shown by the fact that they 
vary in appearance according as tbey are seen 
in periods of sun-spot maxima and minima. 
They extend to the greatest distances, and pre- 
sent the most complex and interesting phenom- 
ena at the sun-spot maxima when the sun is 
racked and rent by internal forces. Builder. 

Concerning Sanitary Science. 

The New York Star, in an able editorial, 
makes some assertions which must be startling 
to members of the profession who have been 
taking a Rip- Van- Winkle sleep during the 
last generation or two. We quote a few para- 
graphs: "One of the marked changes of our 
time is the altered position of the physician 
in the community. The traditional duty of 
the doctor is to cure disease, and disease was 
supposed to be a sort of malignant entity 
which had got into the system and could be 
expelled only by the most energetic and heroic 
remedies. Physicians were said to belong to 
the medical profession, as the chief business of 
the doctor was to prescribe medicines, which 
were mostly drugs. And Voltaire wittily sum- 
marized the work of the physician as an attempt 
to work a miracle by reconciling intemperance 
and health. A half century has altered the 
whole scope of medical study. .Sanitary science 
profoundly affects medical theories. And the 



Of all kinds is fast dissolving. People 

are everywhere learning that sunlight, pure air, 

good food, a proper dress, n 

of sleep — in .short, that right living is a million 

tter than all the medieiu. 
"Tit. great physi nans of i . . vastly 

more inr i oitary science and I 

than in therapuetica 

'ions pertaining to life. They 
of perfect pl 
existence, The] ecturesandv riting 

books on the great a 

raloping physical fore,-, of building up a perfeel 
body. The questions of drainage and ventila- 
tion, Of the nutritive vnbi 

■ food and the proper mi thod cool 

ing, of artificis I ■ hen it is neci 

■ 
and the quantity and fashion of clothi 
should be i assuming an impi 

unknown, Everything that n 
the art of living so as to avoid siokne 
pain, and maintain thi ol power 

and enjoyment, i 

The physi sian i no longei a medicine n an, 
n when ill, 11 i aim 

his sural i : but we 

would pay him a double fee to keen us well. 
Mr is a member of s health police, who;,, func 
tion it is too keep people from _Mm L i. i and 
hold dis- And instead of killing 
a doctor when a patient dies, after the manner 
of the Emperor of China, tnl kill and profi- 
ciency of the physician of the future will I e de 
termined by his success in i patients 

strong and well; and should they fall ill, he 
may be dismissed for a better 

Tiik object glass for the great refracting tele 
scope intended tor the Russian observatory of 
Pulkowa, has been finished by the Messrs. Clark, 

Of ( 'am bridge, Mass., and is the largest glass thus 
far constructed. The order for the glass was 
given in 1SS1 by Prof. Strnve, the director of 
the observatory, who has lately visited this 
country for the purpose of subjecting the glass 
to certain tests of its quality. These, it is said, 
proved to be in every way satisfactory, and the 
object glass is by this time on its way to its 
ultimate destination, if, indeed, it has not al- 
ready arrived there. This great object glass is 
thirty inches in diameter. Pulkowa, however, 
will not be able to claim very long the distinc- 
tion of having the largest refracting telescope 
the world, for the great Lick telescope for 
California will have an object glass of thirty-six 
inches diameter, or six inches greater. Six- 
inches appears a small addition, but it represents 
an enormous increase in power, for the light- 
gathering area of the Lick object glass will be- 
to that of Pulkowa as 1,296 to 900, or forty per 
cent greater. The rough disk of the Hint por- 
tion of the Lick glass has already been received 
by the Clarks, and they are at work upon it. It 
will be several years before it is finished. 

The Known ami tiik Unknown.— The opin- 
ion is commonly expressed by those who are 
not well informed, that the world is so rapidly 
advancing in scientific discovery that a few 
years more of such extraordinary advancement 
as we have witnessed during the past quarter. of 
a century, will practically exhaust the sources 
of discovery, and the scientist will sigh in vain 
for "new worlds to conquer.'' No opinion 
could, in reality, be more delusive than this. 
Each fresh discovery which discloses a secret 
that nature lias so long and carefully guarded, 
illuminates with its feeble rays a background of 
other mysteries still unsolved, and so far from 
narrowing the field of discovery, widens the 
circle of the unknown and places its horizon 
still further off. He who thinks he has mas- 
tered a science is a superficial thinker. The 
profound thinker is he, who, having possessed 
himself of all the knowledge of his predeces- 
sors, perceives how Uttle the sum of that knowl- 
edge is, in comparison with what still remains 
to be learned. 



American Association for Ad\ ancement 
OF SCIENCE. — The thirty -second meeting of the 
American Association for the Advancement of 
Science will be held at Minneapolis, Minn., be- 
ginning August 15th, and closing August 21st 
next. Prof. C. A. Young, of Princeton, will 
preside. Information regarding transportation 
may be obtained by addressing Thos. Lowry, 
Esq., Minneapolis, Minn. All matters relating 
to membership, the presentation of papers, and 
business to come before the meeting will be at- 
tended to b\ I'. YV. Putnam, permanent Secre- 
tary, who may be addressed at Salem, Mass., 
up to August 8th, and afterward up to the close 
of the meeting, August 21st, at tli£ Nicollet 
house, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Tiik Earth More Rigid Than Steel. — Prof. 
Sir YV. Thomson, in his new treatise on natural 
philosophy, is led, by a consideration of the 
necessary order of cooling and consolidation of 
the earth, to infer that the interior of our world 
is not, as commonly supposed, all liquid, with 
a thin, solid crust of from 20 to 100 miles thick, 
but that it is on the whole more rigid than a 
continuous solid globe of glass of the same 
diameter, and probably more rigid than such a 
globe of steel. 



Tin: Yolta prize of SO, 000 will be awarded 
by the Academy of Sciences, Paris, in Decem- 
ber, 1SS7, under the decree of June U, 1SS2, 
for the discovery or invention of whatever shall 
render electricity applicable economically to one 
of the, following objects : Heat, light, chemical 
action, mechanical force, the transmission of 



ot of 'it all is that the old faith in drugs and ' messages, or the treatment of sick persons. 



68 



Mining and' Scientific Press. 



[August 4, 1883 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 



Compiled bvbry Tuubsdav from Advertisements in Mining and Scientific Press and other S. F. Journals. 



ASSESSMENTS— STOCKS ON THE LI3TS OF THE BOARDS. 
Company. Location. No. Aji't. Levied. Delinq'nt. Sale. Secretary. Place of Business. 

AltaSMCo Nevada.. 26.. 25. .July 3. .Aug 7.. ..Aug 27. .Win. H. Watson 302 Montgomery st 

Ancles S MCo Nevada.. 22.. 25. June 27.. Aug 2.... Aug 22.. B Burris ; 309 Montgomery st 

ArgentaMCo Nevada.. 16. . 25... June 21... July 24. ...Aug 17..EMHall 327 Piue st 

Albion Con M Co Nevada.. 14.. 50.. July 17.. Aug 20.... Sept 8.. AW Havens 309 Montgomery st 

Chollar M Co Nevada. .12.. 1.00. .Aug 2. .Sept 6. ...Sept 28. .WE Dean 309 Montgomery st 

Con Virginia MCo .Nevada. .19.. 20.. July 11. .Aug 15. ...Sept 5. .AW Havens 309 Montgomery st 

California M Co Nevada.. 8.. 20.. June 26. .Aug 4. ...Sept 3..CP Gordon 309 Montgomery st 

" . 20.. June 15.. July 19. ...Aug 9. .R Wegener 414 California st 

1.00. July 26. .Aug 27.. ..Sept 17 .. P Jacobus. . 309 Montgomery st 

40. .June 16. . July 23. . . . Aug 10. .T J Wattson 114 Davis st 

, 5.00. .June 5. .July 9.... July 26.. W. Cunningham 326 Montgomery st 

. 20.. June 14. .July 19.... Aug 9. .CE Elliott 327_ Pine st 

, 25.. June 25.. July 27. 

. 50.. June 15.. July 20. 

, 30. .June 27. .July 30. 

10.. July 9. .Aug 13. 

" .July 17. .Aug 22. 



Caledonia M Co Nevada . . 39 

Eureka Con M Co Nevada. . 5 

Excelsior D G MCo California.. 22. 

Excelsior D G M Co California.. 1. 

Exchequer M Co Nevada. ,19. 

Grand Prize M Co Nevada.. 14.. 

Gould & Curry M Co Nevada. .45. . 

Holmes MCo Nevada. .7.. 

Justice M Co Nevada. .39.. 

Mexican MCc Nevada. .23.. 

Martin White M Co Nevada.. 15.. 

Ophir M Co Nevada. .45. . 

Savage M Co Nevada. .56.. 

Tip Top M Co Arizona.. 6.. 

T" ii ion i 'no M Co Nevada.. 23.. 

Utah S M Co Nevada. .45. . 

Virginia Con M Co California. .10.. 

OTHER COMPANIES-NOT ON THE LISTS OF THE BOARDS 



Aug 20..EMHall 327 Pine st 

Aug 13. .A K Durbrow 309 Montgomery st 

Aug 21. .0 T Bridge 224 California st 

Sept 3.. RE Kelly 419 California st 

Sept 11.. CL McCoy 309 Montgomery st 

25. .July 9. July 11.. ..Aug 8.. J J Scoville ....309 Montgomery st 

1.00. .July 28. .Aug 31. ...Sept 20..CLMcCoy 309 Montgomery st 

50.. July 19.. Aug 21..,, Sept 10.. E B Holmes 309 Montgomery st 

25. May 29. .July 6 . Aug 6..HDeas 309 Montgomery st 

50.. July 17.. Aug 20... Sept 11.. J M Buttingtcm 309 California st 

1.00. .July 20. .Aug 27... Sept 14. .i; C Pratt 309 Montgomery st 

01 . . July 24 . . Sept 3 . . . . Sept 24. . A F Benard 364 Howard st 



Alexander M Co Nevada.. 2. 

Bald Mountain MCo California.. 2. 

Champion M Co California.. 12. 

< 'iiiiw Eureka G and S M Co. . .Nevada. . 1. 

Eintracht G M Co California. .12. 

Excelsior Water and M Co... California. . 5. 

Ei iiiitable M Co Utah . . 28. 

Genesee MCo California.. 1. 

Hazard Gravel M Co California. . 7. 

Homeward-hound M Co California.. 2. 

Lima Con MCo Arizona . . 6 . 

Paciliic M & Reducing Co California. . 1. 

Pittsburg M Co California.. 16. 

Roma Union M Co .Nevada. . 2 . 

Swansea M Co California.. 3. 

Seaton G M Co California. . 3. . 

West Branch Feather River M Co..Cal.. 1. 



1 . 00 . . June 20 . . Aug 6 . . . . Aug 27 . . J K Warren 307 Montgomery st 

~ . . Aug 30. .L Shannahau 125 First at 

..Aug 11.. T Wetzel 522 Montgomery st 

-Sept 18. .L Hermann 220 Sausome st 

..Aug 27.. H Kunz 209 Sansome st 

. Sept 3. . W J Stewart 215 Sansome st 



..June 26. .July 27.. 
10. .June 4. .July 34.. 
25. .July 23 .Aug 29-. 
05.. June 12.. Aug 8.. 
60.. July 



25. .July 24. .Aug 31.. ..Sept 28. .C J Collins 512 Montgomery st 

40. .June 20. .July 30. . . . Aug 22. .J Stedtfeld 419 California st 

1?, . .June 20. .Aug 16. . . . Sept 4. . J T McGeoghegau 318 Pine st 

25. .July 23. .Aug 27.. ..Sept 10. .A S Bowie 314 Montgomery st 

05. .June 11. .July 18. . . .Aug 6..RD Hopkins 436 Montgomery st 

25.. June 20.. July 25. ...Aug 15...T W Beviliug 413 Calif ornia st 

10. .July 24. .Aug 28 ... . Sept 18. . R Wegener 414 California st 

02. .June 18. .Aug 6. . . .Aug 27. .F. X. Simon 518 Sansome st 

25. .July 21. .Sept l....Sept 24. .M A Wheeler 119 Market st 

8. .July 31. .Sept 5. ...Sept 27. .A Martin 525 California st 

01. .July 16. .Aug 20. . . .Sept 10.. A B Paul 328 Montgomery st 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 
Name ok Company. Location. Secretary. Office in S. F. Meeting. 
Alfca S M Co... . . Nevada.. Wm H Watson 302 Montgomery st Annual., 



Date, 
. . . Aug 16 

Champion M Co California.. B Burris 309 Montgomery st Annual July 30 

DerhecBlue Gravel M Co Calif ornia.. Then Wetzel 522 Montgomery^ Annua! Aug 7 

Julia Con M Co Nevada.. H C Charles 419 California st Annual Aug 8 

Liberty Hill Con MCo FE Luty 330 Pine st Annual Aug 6 

Mayflower Gravel M Co California.. J Morizio 328 Montgomery st Annual July 26 

Martin White M Co Nevada.. J J Scoville 309 Montgomery st Annual Aug 16 

Navajo M Co Nevada.. J W Pew 310 Pine st Annual Aug 14 

Occidental M Co .Nevada.. A K Durbrow 309 Montgomery st Annual Aug 13 

New York Hill M Co California.. J B Leighton 527 Clay st Annual July 30 

Red Hill Hydraulic M Co.. California. ,E Hestre.s 328 Montgomery st Annual Aug 9 

South Feather Water &. U MCo.. California.. A J Halsey 328 Montgomery st Annual Aug I3 

LATEST DIVIDENDS-WITHIN THREB MONTHS. 
Name of Company. Location. Secretary. office in S. F. Amount. Payable 

Bidwer Con M Co California. .W Willis .309 Montgomery st 15 July 2 

Kentuek M Co Nevada. .J W Pew 310 Pine st 10 July 19 

Navajo M Co Nevada.. J W Pew 310 Pine st 25 May 14 

Silver King M Co Arizona.. J Nash 315 California st 25 July 12 

Standard Con M Co Calif ornia.. Win Willis 309 Montgomery st 25 June 12 



IjQij^g &jjvijviy\^Y. 



The following is mostly condensed from journals pub- 
lished in the interior, in proximity to the mines mentioned. 



Table of Highest and Lowest Sales in 
S. F. Stock Exchange. 



Name of 


Week 


Week 


Week 


Week 




Ending 


Ending 


Ending 


Ending 


Company. 


July 12. 


July 


19. 


July 26. 


Aug. 1. 




1.50 


2 002.00 


2.301.90 


2.001.80 2 00 


Alta , 


.'/.I 


1.00 .65 


.75 .60 


.70 .65 .7C 




.40 
.40 


.50'.... 
.50, .35 


.451 .40 
.40.... 




Albion 


.35.... ■ .35 


Aigenta 

Atlas 

Belcher 

Beldine 


.0b 


.10.... 


.05 .05 


.50 1 


1.15 


1.251.20 


i!25'!85 


ilia' M i!66 


4.25 


4.454!i5 


4!i6i!o6 


i'.303!75 i'30 


Bullion 




,85|.... 


.85! .75 


.80, .70 .80 


Bechtel 






........ 






Belle Isle 




.45! .35 


.45.... 


,35 


40 




.60 


.80 .60 


.80.... 


65 


.65 .70 






.25 .15 


.20 
,30 


.15 


.20 










Caledonia 




.05 .5 


.25 




25 


.... .25 


OalifoTDia 


.10 


.15 .10 


.15 


05 


15 


.25 .40 


Challenge 




........ 






.3(1 


30 


Chollar 


t.-M 


3.75 3.35 


3.803.50 


3.85 2 90 3.30 




2.0b 


2,252.00 


2.151.65 


1.751.55 2.00 


Coll. Imperial 




.10'.... 






1(1 


05 




.4(1 


.50i .35 


,hh 


35 


41! 


.30 .40 


Crown Boiut 


1.40 


1.45 1.30 


1 -l:i 


85 


1 11 


.80 1.10 


Day 




.50 ... . 


50 




5i 


.35 .55 


Elko Coo 






:a 






25 


Eureka Cou 


4.K 


6.004.50 


5 Oil 


4 75 


5 or 


4.80 6.00 


Eureka Tunnel 




.601.... 






sr 


.50 .55 


Exchequer 


.20 


.25 .20 


.Ml 


40 


5f 


.40 .50 


Grand Prize 




.051.... 


,05 








Gould & Curry 


1 411 


2.502.40 


3 (15 


2 no 


3 05 


2.55 3.15 


Hale & Norcross. . . 
Independence 


5i 


611 6J 


6S 


6.75 


7.00 


6.00 6.50 




.60.... 


50 




.50 


.45 .50 






.25'.... 










Justice 


.20 


.10 .15 


Jacksnu 




.35.... 


fill 








Kentuek 








2 6(1 








Martin White 




.115 








95 


.20 .25 


Mono 










2 80 


2 95 






2.90 


3 15 


2.60 


V 95 






2.80 3.25 


Mt. Tluilil 

Mt. I'otnsi 


4.50 


6.00 


5.00 


5.50 




5.50 


5.00 5.50 


Noonday 

Northern Belle 


6J 


i'.w 








7.'o6 


6^75 7J5 


















Navajo 


2.40 


3 2d 


2 85 


3 in 


1 05 


,1 41" 


3.10 3.25 


North Belle Isle 




:«i 




35 








Occidental.... 








1 511 




1 75 


1.70 1.75 
2.40 5.00 


Ophir 


2.40 


•t 65 


'/. 30 


■!, 55 


2 40 


" 7' 


Overman 




.40 


.30 


.35 




.35 
l'«0 


.30 .40 




1.45 


1 55 


1,50 


1.70 


1 40 


1.10 1.40 


















Savage 


1.95 


2 05 


2.10 


2.452.25 


2 40 


1.80 2.20 


Seg. 1. richer 




3,1)11 






2 


3 0( 




Sierra Nevada 


3.90 


4 45 


3.65 


4, It 


3 80 


4 35 


3.85 4.25 


















Silver King 


8.50 


9 75 


61 


6ft 






... 6.50 


bcorpion 


.60 


.71: 


.Oil 


.«> 


60 


65 




1 u icarora 






























4.70 5.00 
2.20 2.25 


Utah :.. 


2.05 


2.S5 


2.40 


2.752.30 


2.50 


Wales 








........ 






Yellow Jacket 


3.75 


4.053.75 


4 00 2.75 


3.50 


2.80 3.05 



















Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange 



, Aug. 2. 
. . . .65@70c 
70c 



TUURfSMAV A. B 

450 Alta 

2130 Andes 

200 B. & Belcher. 
300 Belcher 

50 Bullion 80c 

275 Chollar ... .3.10@3.15 

50 Crown Point 1.05 

975 California 40(ff45c 

50 Confidence 2 

200 Challenge 25@30c 

180 Caledonia 25c 

1575 Con. Virginia 40c 

15 Eureka Con 5J 

220 Gould & Curry. ...3{rr3. 05 

880 Hale & Nor 6i<S>6j 

400 Mexican 3.20(1*3; 

100 Navajo 3.11 

50 Northern Belle , 

2755 Ophir 4?.©4 60 

20 Overman 40c 

100 Potosi 1.30 

200 Savage 2.10 

350 SierraNevada..4.15(«4 20 
300 Senator.... 

20 Silver King. 

10 Utah 2.40 



100 Union 5 

A BTEB NO< 1 N SKSSI < 1 s 

200 Alhion ; 35c 

100 Ali-lia 1.90 

50 Andes 70c 

20 Belcher 90c 

300 Belle Isle 40c 

200 BodieCon 75c 

100 Bullion 80c 

20 B. & Belcher 4.05 

320 Chollar 3!(»3.30 

375 Con. Virginia.... 35<«40c 

60 Crown Point l.lo 

50 Challenge 30c 

400 California 35@40c 

40 Exchequer 50c 

520 Gould k Curry. £.95@3. 05 

160 Hale& Nor 62